Monthly Archives: November 2015

Essay Competition: SAIMS/The Medieval Journal

SAIMS/TMJ ESSAY PRIZE

SAIMS invites entries for its annual Essay Competition, submitted according to the following rules:

1. The competition is open to all medievalists who are graduate students or have completed a higher degree within the last three years. For PhD students the time period of three years begins from the date of the successful viva, but excludes any career break. Any candidate in doubt of their eligibility should contact the Director of SAIMS at saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk.

2. A candidate may make only one submission to the competition.

3. The submission must be the candidate’s own work, based on original research, and must not have been previously published or accepted for publication.

4. Submissions are welcomed on any topic that falls within the scope of medieval studies.

5. The submission should be in the English language.

6. The word limit is 8,000 words, including notes, bibliography, and any appendices.

7. The text should be double-spaced, and be accompanied by footnotes with short referencing and a full bibliography of works cited, following the guidelines on the webpage: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims/tmj.htm. An abstract of 200 words should preface the main text.

8. The deadline for submissions is 24 March 2016.

9. The essay must be submitted electronically to saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk, in both Word and pdf formats, to arrive by the deadline.

10. The submission must be accompanied by a completed cover sheet and signed declaration; the template for this is available at http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims/tmj.htm. The candidate’s name should not appear on the submission itself, nor be indicated in any form in the notes.

11. Decisions concerning the Competition lie with the Editors and Editorial Board of The Mediaeval Journal, who can, if they consider there to have been appropriate submissions, award an Essay Prize and in addition declare a proxime accessit. In the unlikely event that, in the judges’ opinion, the material submitted is not of a suitable standard, no prize will be awarded.

12. The value of the Prize is £500.

13. A candidate whose entry is declared proxime accessit will be awarded £100.

14. In addition to the Prize, the winning submission will be published within twelve months in

The Mediaeval Journal, subject to the usual editorial procedures of the journal.

Any queries concerning these rules may be directed to the Director of SAIMS who can be contacted at: Department of Mediaeval History, 71 South Street, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9QW

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk

 

Post-Doc: CLIR-DLF Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies

CLIRFellowships in Data Curation for Medieval Studies
Information for Applicants
The CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Data Curation for Medieval Studies is an expansion of the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Academic Libraries. These five, fully-funded fellowships will provide recent Ph.D.s with professional development, education, and training opportunities in data curation for Medieval Studies. Through this program, CLIR seeks to raise awareness and build capacity for sound data management practice throughout the academy.

Each fellowship is a two-year appointment, with a commensurate salary, plus benefits, and a yearly travel and research stipend.

Who May Apply
Recent Ph.D.s from any discipline with relevant expertise in Medieval Studies are encouraged to apply, so long as they meet the eligibility criteria for the Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

2016 Host Institutions and Position Descriptions
Fellows will be placed at research institutions throughout the United States. Additional position descriptions for 2016-2018 will be posted here.

University of Pennsylvania

Questions about the application process or the program should be directed to postdoc@clir.org.

See details on the CLIR website here.

HISTORIANS OF ISLAMIC ART ASSOCIATION 2016 Biennial Conference

The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London
October 20-22, 2016
Regionality: looking for the local in the arts of Islam
The Fifth Biennial Conference of the Historians of Islamic Art Association will take place at The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, from October 20th to October 22nd, 2016. The Courtauld Institute of Art is one of the world’s preeminent centres for the study of art history and conservation. The introduction in 2013 of a dedicated teaching position for Islamic art history marks the enormous strides taken in our field in recent decades, and recognizes the fact that the study of the arts of Islam have become an integral part of the broader art historical discipline and have made important contributions to cross-cultural studies, trans-disciplinary approaches, and the general widening of the scope of art history.

The London venue celebrates the European ‘roots’ of the study of the arts that fall under the cultural umbrella of Islam, and the formation of the important early collections and exhibitions that launched its scholarship. Those early, mostly connoisseurial categories of regional types and styles – the “Moresque”, Persian painting, Turkish tiles, Indian decorative arts – formed the foundations from which universalizing narratives of “Islamic” arts emerged, especially in the period after the Second World War. Some fifty years later, we are witnessing a resurgence of the study of regional specificities, augmented with deeper research into the diverse facets of any given locality or artistic form, and a greater commitment to the linguistic and cultural particularities that shaped the arts, architecture and archaeology in a specific locale. Rigorous application of trans-disciplinary research strategies have contributed to the deepening of our understanding of the arts of Islam in local terms, and have allowed us to embrace broader historical trajectories to include the modern and contemporary in our field.

The conference organizers believe that this is a time to celebrate the diversity within HIAA’s specialist remit and to take stock of our field’s capacity for extending beyond nationalistic formulations of history, and for breaking out of Euro-centred identities and perspectives. As such we invite proposals for papers and pre-organized panels that take regionality as their principal theme, that complicate simplistic assumptions about ethno-national labels, and that highlight the local. Paper proposals from all parts of the field, from the late antique to the contemporary, from Spain to Southeast Asia, are welcome.

The conference program will feature guided object-handling sessions at the Victoria and Albert Museum and the British Museum, allowing direct access to a wide range of media from these two remarkable survey collections. On October 19th, there will be an opportunity to preview the exhibition Power and Protection: Islamic Art and the Supernatural, at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology in Oxford (travel to Oxford not provided). On October 23rd, the Sarikhani Collection of Persian Art in Oxfordshire has generously invited conference participants to a daylong visit to the collection (travel by coach will be provided).

Graduate students and early career scholars will be considered for travel and lodging grants. We urge our senior colleagues to seek funding in their home institutions. The conference schedule will be finalized by August 2016. There will be three keynote talks marking each day of the conference and a special dinner on October 22nd for all speakers, session chairs and discussants. Tea, coffee, and some lunches will be provided. The guided handling sessions – in small groups and focused by media – take place on the morning of Friday 21st October at the V&A and British Museum. Advance registration required. Details forthcoming.

Abstracts and Panel Proposals
Proposals may be submitted either for individual papers or for pre-arranged panels. Paper proposals should include your name, contact information, affiliated institution, professional/academic position, paper title, and the abstract.

Panel proposals should include a panel description of no more than 300 words and the names, contacts, and proposal abstracts of all participants.

The abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and should indicate the original contribution of the paper and/or panel.

Proposals should be submitted by Monday 4th January 2016 to Sussan Babaie, HIAA President-elect, at HIAABiennial2016@gmail.com.

Selected speakers will be given 20 minutes for their presentation followed by a short Q&A. Time will be allotted for panel discussions at the end of each panel.

All Symposium participants must be HIAA members in good standing. To join or renew your membership in HIAA, please follow the instructions on the HIAA website: http://www.historiansofislamicart.org

Program Committee for HIAA Biennial 2016:
Mariam Rosser-Owen, Victoria and Albert Museum
Scott Redford, SOAS, University of London
Sussan Babaie, The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London

Key dates:
Deadline for submission of abstracts and panel proposals: 4 January 2016
Accepted papers and panels announced via email: 28 February 2016
Deadline for draft paper submission: 1 September 2016
Conference dates: 20-22 October 2016

For further details please contact Sussan Babaie at HIAABiennial2016@gmail.com

Post-doc: Mellon Post-Doctorial Fellowships at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies (Toronto)

The Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies is offering post-doctoral Fellowships to be used for research at the Institute in the medieval field of the holder’s choice. The Mellon Fellowships are ibldgntended for young medievalists of exceptional promise who have completed their doctoral work within the previous five years, including those who are starting their professional academic careers. The Fellowships are valued at approximately $35,000 (CDN) and include participation in the interdisciplinary Research Seminars.

Applications for the academic year 2016-2017 should be e-mailed in PDF format (preferred) or as a Word document to the Institute Secretary at barbara.north@utoronto.ca. Reference letters may also be e-mailed directly by the referee to the Institute Secretary. Completed applications and supporting documentation must be received no later than 1 February 2016. The awarding institution must send official confirmation to the postal address below that the PhD has been examined and approved.

Application forms and further details may be obtained from the website at http://www.pims.ca/academics/mellons.html

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
59 Queen’s Park Crescent East
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5S 2C4

CFP: Heraldry in Medieval and Early Modern State-Rooms

Münster, Germany, March 16 – 18, 2016
Deadline: Dec 15, 2015

Heraldry in Medieval and Early Modern State-Rooms: Towards a Typology
of Heraldic Programmes in Spaces of Self-Representation

Heraldry was an ubiquitous element of state-rooms. Whether in palaces
of kings and princes, castles of noblemen, residences of patricians,
city halls or in cathedral chapters, heraldic display was a crucial
element in  the visual programme of these spaces. Despite its
omnipresence, however, heraldic display in state-rooms remains largely
understudied so far.

Given the fundamental role of heraldry in medieval and early modern
visual communication, it seems essential to incorporate the study of
heraldry into our understanding of the state-rooms and their functions.
The heraldic programmes appear to have been intimately tied to the
functions of those rooms and the strategies of self-representation and
communication employed by commissioners and users of such places.

This workshop aims to explore these heraldic programmes in state-rooms
in medieval and early modern Europe and to suggest an initial typology
of this phenomenon. We would like to include case studies showcasing
different social and institutional examples. In the context of the
workshop, we understand state-rooms to be rooms used for ceremonies and
receptions, and spaces able to construct and express identity that were
meant to be witnessed by  members of a community itself as well as by
outsiders.

Heraldry in state-rooms was displayed in a variety of media, including,
but not limited to, paintings, stained-glass, sculptures, tiles,
tapestries, curtains, furniture. As part of ceremonies, it also
appeared as ephemeral decor. The topics of such heraldic programmes
were diverse. They could represent genealogical, chivalric, legendary
as well as historical and commemorative themes, reflect political
networks and convey political and imaginary  ideas.

We particularly welcome comparative papers on the heraldic display of
state-rooms and groups of state-rooms from different geographical,
social and institutional contexts. Rather than only identifying the
displayed coats of arms, contributions should address the heraldic
ensembles in their entirety and locate them in their specific social
and institutional contexts, aiming to further our understanding of the
functions of heraldic display in the state-rooms and their visual
programme.

Papers can be presented in English or French. Proposals (200 words in
French or English) should be sent to heraldica@uni-muenster.de by 15
December 2015.

The workshop is organised by Miguel Metelo de Seixas (Lisbon) and
Torsten Hiltmann (Münster) as part of the Portuguese-German research
project “In the Service of the Crown: The Use of Heraldry in Royal
Political Communication in Late Medieval Portugal”, funded by the
VolkswagenFoundation.

Lecture: Professor Robert Bork, “Drawings and the Transmission of Geometrical Knowledge across Time, Space, and Media”

Tuesday 24 November 20154:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Sackler Research Forum Seminar Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

Open to all, no booking required!image001-723x1024

In this talk Robert Bork will consider Gothic architectural drawings as vehicles for the transmission of geometrical information, placing their development in the context of a broader tradition of geometrical design that reaches with a surprising degree of continuity across the long Middle Ages.  After brief discussion of the geometrical toolkit used by the creators of early medieval manuscripts and jewelry, he will explore the flourishing of architectural drawing in the Gothic era and its impact on both design practice and the sharing of visual information across temporal and geographical boundaries.  He will devote particular attention to the analysis of a fantastic drawing produced in or near Regensburg around 1400 that shows a single-spired façade, whose close geometrical relationship to the thirteenth-century choir of Regensburg Cathedral has not formerly been recognized.  In conclusion, he will demonstrate that many of the same geometrical techniques used by Gothic church designers were also used not only by some northern fifteenth-century painters, but also by Italian painters active in the decades around 1500, including Piero di Cosimo and Piero della Francesca.

St Stephen’s Chapel live

St Stephens chapelEver wondered how a medieval palace chapel was built?  St Stephen’s Chapel, Westminster (constructed 1292-1363) was one of the most influential buildings of its age, and extensive records of its creation survive in the National Archives, London.  From 21st November 2015, we will be using Twitter to post a live feed of a whole year of the chapel’s building accounts (1323-24) in real time.  It will be updated twice weekly, showing details of materials, workmen and techniques which give a unique glimpse into the world of medieval building.

Follow along at https://twitter.com/SSC_Live.

This twitter feed forms part of the Virtual St Stephen’s Project based at the University of York, a facet of the wider AHRC-funded interdisciplinary project St Stephen’s Chapel, Westminster: Visual & Political Culture 1292-1941.  The accounts we are using are being transcribed and translated for publication as a critical edition by Dr Maureen Jurkowski and Prof. Tim Ayers.  This project is generously funded by the Leverhulme Trust.

Virtual St Stephen’s Project site

Leverhulme Project page