Online Exhibitions: The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania

The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at the University of Pennsylvania have a number of online exhibitions for you to enjoy.

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A Legacy Inscribed: The Lawrence J. Schoenberg Collection of Manuscripts

Originally exhibited March 1-August 16, 2013, this exhibit showcases the Schoenberg Collection of manuscripts held at the University of Pennsylvania. Each section of the exhibition – Arts and Sciences, Communication, Design, Education, Engineering, Law, the Medical Arts, and Social Policy and Practice – showcases texts, textbooks, documents, and letters that embody the history and mission of the schools that form the University. Often illustrated with complex diagrams and stunning imagery, the manuscripts bring to the present the intellectual legacy of the distant past.

Reactions: Medieval/Modern

Originally exhibited August 25-December 16, 2016, this exhibition explores the many and varied ways that people have reacted to, and acted upon, manuscripts from the Middle Ages up to today.

Intertwined Worlds

Originally exhibited August 23-December 22, 2017, this exhibition explores pre-modern religious traditions of South and Southeast Asia including Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism.

A Liberal Arts Education for the (Middle) Ages: Texts, Translations, and Study

This online exhibition explores the study of the liberal arts, the texts of Boethius, and the intellectual life of early medieval monasteries through a selection of manuscripts from the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. Curated by Christine E. Bachman.

Making the Renaissance Manuscript: Discoveries from Philadelphia Libraries

Originally exhibited March 16-July 25, 2020, this exhibit draws on local collections. It attempts to encompass the broadest possible scope of ideas and material manifestations associated with the European Renaissance. It explores the numerous ways in which the production of hand-written and hand-decorated documents flourished during this period, even as the age of the printing press dawned. The 100 items in the exhibit, drawn from ten local collections, encompass a broad array of ideas and material manifestations associated with the European Renaissance. Curated by Nicholas Herman.

Published by Roisin Astell

Roisin Astell received a First Class Honours in History of Art at the University of York (2014), under the supervision of Dr Emanuele Lugli. After spending a year learning French in Paris, Roisin then completed an MSt. in Medieval Studies at the University of Oxford (2016), where she was supervised by Professor Gervase Rosser and Professor Martin Kauffmann. In 2017, Roisin was awarded a CHASE AHRC studentship as a doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, under the supervision of Dr Emily Guerry.

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