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Lecture series Uncategorized Workshops

CRSBI lecture at Cardiff Archaeological Society, 19 October 2017 | CRSBI Training Session, Llandlaff Cathedral, 20 October 2017

Lecture: The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland: Achievements and Aspirations, Dr Ron Baxter FSA and Dr David Robinson FSA, Main Building, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT, Thursday 19 October 2017, 7.15pm

This lecture will review CRSBI’s achievements to date, and outline aspirations for Wales, looking at Romanesque sculpture from across the country.

Training Session: The following Friday, 20 October, Ron Baxter and David Robinson will be running a training session at Llandlaff Cathedral, from 10.00am to 3.00pm. The day is open to all who may be interested in becoming a fieldworker for the Corpus, or in simply finding out more about our work.

Dr Ron Baxter is the Research Director of CRSBI

Dr David Robinson is an independent historian and writer

 

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Conference Upcoming Events

Conference: Society, Rule and Their Representation in Medieval Britain (13-14 November 2014)

v0_master[1]13-14 November 2014

German Historical Institute London • 17 Bloomsbury Square • London WC1A 2NJ

ATTENDANCE IS FREE; THERE IS NO NEED TO REGISTER.

Official page

THURSDAY, 13 NOVEMBER

14:00-14:15 WELCOME

14:15-15:45 SESSION 1: IDENTITY (CHAIR: KATHERINE HARVEY, BIRKBECK)

Torben Gebhardt (Münster): Self-Categorisation of Medieval Rulers between 1016-1138 – A Comparison between England and the Holy Roman Empire

Isabelle Chwalka (Mainz): Conception and Perception of England and the Empire in the Twelfth Century

Stephan Bruhn (Kiel): Of Suffering Kings, Unwise Bishops and Violent Abbots – Concepts of Elites in ‘Biographical Writings’

15:45-16:30 COFFEE BREAK

16:30-18:30 SESSION 2: RULE AND KINGSHIP (CHAIR: ALEXANDRA SAPOZNIK, KCL)

Grischa Vercamer (Berlin): Descriptions of Power and Rulers in the High Middle Ages: English Chronicles in European Context

Bastian Walter-Bogedain (Wuppertal): “I ́ve got him, I  ́ve got him!” Or: How to Capture a King on a Battlefield

Ulla Kypta (Frankfurt): The Power of Routines: The Emergence of the English Exchequer during the 12th Century

Martin Stier (Heidelberg): Barons, Lords, Peers. Rank in the English Baronage

in the 14th Century

FRIDAY, 14. NOVEMBER

9:15-10:45 SESSION 3: VISUAL REPRESENTATION (CHAIR: ALIXE BOVEY, UNIVERSITY OF KENT)

Veronika Decker (Vienna): Planting the Vineyard of the Just: The Foundation of New College, Oxford and the Stained Glass of the College Chapel

Julia Crispin (Münster): French Treasures for an English Prince: John of Bedford, Regent of France, and his French Illuminated Books

Antje Fehrmann (Berlin): Courts or Concepts? Cultural Networks and Artistic Exchanges in 15th-Century England and Germany

10:45-11:15 COFFEE BREAK

11:15-12:45 SESSION 4: SOCIETY (CHAIR: IAN FORREST, OXFORD)

Franziska Klein (Duisburg-Essen): The King’s Converts – Caritas, Conversion and Control in Late Medieval England

Tanja Skambraks (Mannheim/Rome): Children, Liturgy and Festive Culture in Medieval London

Ute Kühlmann (Mannheim): Celtic Fosterage

12:45-13:00 CLOSING REMARKS

Categories
Conference Upcoming Events

Conference: The Augustinian Canons in Britain – Architecture, Archaeology, Art and Liturgy (Nov 7-9, 2014)

O14P101ARR_1_Abstract[1]The Augustinian Canons in Britain – Architecture, Archaeology, Art, and Liturgy 1100-1540

Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford

Fri 7 to Sun 9 Nov 2014
The Augustinian canons are very much the Cinderellas of medieval monastic history. In Britain, despite their prolific numbers, the not inconsiderable quantity and quality of their archives, and the fame and celebrity of much of their surviving architecture, the canons continue to stand in the shadow of the more familiar and generally better-researched monastic groups, most notably the Benedictines and the Cistercians.

Encouragingly, in recent years, a new generation of monastic historians has been working hard to redress this balance, but much remains to be done. In particular, the buildings of the Augustinian canons, their architecture, art, and the liturgy within, all remain woefully neglected areas of study. This is surprising, given the celebrity of English sites such as Bolton in Wharfedale, St Frideswide’s in Oxford (now the cathedral church), St Bartholomew’s in London, Hexham, Waltham and Walsingham; or Llanthony and Bardsey in Wales; or Jedburgh and St Andrews in Scotland.

This conference presents a major opportunity to consider the buildings at these and many other Augustinian sites across the country – more than 200 in all. It brings together an impressive body of historians, architectural and art historians, and archaeologists, whose principal focus will be the canons in Britain. However, the conference will also provide some contextual Continental background, and will further consider comparative material in Ireland.

It will be the first ever conference to consider the Augustinian canons in Britain from this perspective.

FRIDAY 7 NOVEMBER 2014

6.00pm Registration (for those who have booked meals and or accommodation)

7.00pm Dinner

8.00pm Registration (for those who have booked as non-residential without meals)

8.15pm- What Augustinian architecture?
9.30pm DR DAVID ROBINSON

SATURDAY 8 NOVEMBER 2014

8.00am Breakfast (residents only)

9.15am The Augustinians in England and Wales
PROFESSOR JANET BURTON

10.15am Architecture and Augustinian communities in the Mediterranean c.1080 – c.1200
JOHN MCNEILL

11.15am Coffee / tea

11.45am Aesthetic restraint in a regional frame: Augustinian architecture in France from the eleventh to the fourteenth century
PROFESSOR SHEILA BONDE and PROFESSOR CLARK MAINES

12.45pm Lunch

2.00pm The aisleless cruciform church and the first Augustinian canons in Britain
DR JILL FRANKLIN

3.00pm Greater twelfth-century Augustinian churches in Britain
RICHARD HALSEY

4.00pm Tea / coffee

4.30pm The Augustinians as guardians of pre- and post – Conquest cults
DR DAVID ROBINSON

5.00pm A twelfth-century Augustinian cloister in its liturgical and theological context
THE REVD JEFFREY J WEST

6.00pm Break / bar open

7.00pm Dinner

8.15pm-9.30pm Eastern extensions in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries
DR NICOLA COLDSTREAM

SUNDAY 9 NOVEMBER 2014

8.00am Breakfast (residents only)

9.15am The architecture of the Augustinian canons in Ireland
PROFESSOR ROGER STALLEY

10.15am The liturgical books of the English Augustinians
PROFESSOR NIGEL MORGAN

11.15am Coffee / tea

11.45am The place of patronage in the study of Augustinian art and architecture
DR JULIAN LUXFORD

12.45pm Lunch

2.15pm Meet at Christ Church for an afternoon visit to the Augustinian priory of St Frideswide

4.00pm Course disperses, or you may wish to stay for Evensong which is at 6.00pm

As of 20th Oct 2014 some non-residential places are still available.

To book: – http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/O14P101ARR

 

Categories
Call for Papers

Call for Papers: Writing Britain, 500-1500

Call for Papers: Writing Britain: 500-1500
University of Cambridge, Faculty of English, 30 June – 2 July 2014
Deadline: 20 February 2014

stockphotopro_5711473WLX_medieval_writinWriting Britain is a biennial event which aims to draw on a range of approaches and perspectives to exchange ideas about manuscript studies, material culture, multilingualism in texts and books, book history, readers, audience and scribes across the medieval period. The 2014 iteration of the Writing Britain Conference will take place in the English Faculty at the University of Cambridge under the auspices of the Centre for Material Texts. Some of the topics which we are keen to explore are literary and non-literary agencies and their significance and/or relevance in the medieval period across British medieval written culture in English, French, Latin, Norse and the Celtic languages. More broadly, we are interested in other questions such as: How did local writers, compilers and readers use writing to inscribe regional identity within broader conventions or, on the other hand, impress ‘universal’ practices and constructs on local populations? What were the different markets for books? Can we characterize their developments and differences? What new or existing methodologies can be employed to localise texts and books across Britain? What is the role of the Digital Humanities in the study of medieval book culture?

Plenary speakers: Jonathan Wilcox (University of Iowa), Richard Beadle (University of Cambridge) and Simon Horobin (University of Oxford)

We welcome proposals from scholars working on any aspects of British medieval written culture up to 1500. Please visit our conference web site in order to submit an abstract (300 words or fewer) for a twenty-minute paper. Please send your abstract by 20 February 2014. Abstracts from postgraduate students are welcome and graduate rates will be provided. For further information please visit the website where contact details of the organisers will also be available.

Conference website here.