Tag Archives: University of Birmingham

CFP: ‘Hurt and healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’ – 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies (University of Birmingham) (deadline 21st April 2018)

Hurt and Healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’.

The 19th Annual CBOMGS Postgraduate Colloquium

2nd June 2018

The Committee is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK.

The concepts of hurt, trauma and healing cross between the different disciplines that deal with Eastern Mediterranean. The colloquium aims to explore transformations and multifarious dimensions of the notions of trauma and wreckage, and their opposition, healing, from the Late Antiquity to the Present.

Whilst serving as antitheses to one another they are also complementary. After destruction and breakage, comes the need for repair. However, when a broken textile’s ripped edges are joined again, the visible seam signifies the damage that has happened. Trauma and healing are key concepts in medicine, psychology, and sociology. However, political ideology has constantly used them in order to justify the rising and the existence of authoritarian regimes. In the past, medicine, saints, and magic offered different ways for healing the body and the soul. The current aim of restoration practices is to heal remnants of cultural heritage after damage and to prevent damage with appropriate conservation strategies.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Healing power of saints and healing people in society;
  • Medicine and magic;
  • Cultural heritage and material culture: restoration and preservation practices, as well as preventive actions for the preservation;
  • The individual aspects of trauma, especially in relation to the politics of gender, sexuality, class, race, and identity (sexual abuse, domestic violence, shame and fear, death and mourning or melancholia);
  • Collective experiences of trauma (war, genocide, terrorism, victims and perpetrators, practices of memory and oblivion);
  • Migration from the Late Antiquity to the current migration crisis and harrowing events in refugee camps;
  • Public health and medical, therapeutic approaches to illnesses and trauma;
  • Texts and images related to medical practices

Papers of approximately 20 minutes related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than Saturday 21st April 2018 to 2018cbomgscolloquium@gmail.com.  Applicants will be notified of selection by 28th April 2018.

 

For more information click here: https://cbomgs2018colloquium.wordpress.com/

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CFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era (University of Birmingham)

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Deadline: 30 September 2016

One day and a half Symposium & Workshop

24 and 25 February 2017, held at the University of Birmingham

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire, such as the Adriatic and Balkan regions, the major islands of Cyprus and Crete, and the regions surrounding the cities of Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mystras. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

In its last centuries, the political entity of the Empire of the Romaioi released cultural and artistic energies migrating towards new frontiers of intellectual achievements. The intent is to counter-balance the innovation of these works of art with the notion of decline and the narrative of decay frequently acknowledged for this period; and to promote an understanding of transformation where previous cultural heritages were integrated into new socio-political orders.

The Symposium – hosted on the afternoon of the 24 and the morning of the 25February – will bring together established scholars, early-career scholars, and postgraduate students. Three keynotes will provide the methodological framework for the discussion; while the selected papers will focus solely on the visual expressions and cultural trajectories of the artworks produced during the late Palaiologan Era.

The Workshop, hosted on the afternoon of the 25 February, will offer the opportunity to further the discussion in a more informal setting and for a selected number of Master students to interact and offer brief presentations.

Postgraduate students and early-career scholars are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers on art and architecture history, material culture, visual aspects of palaeography and codicology, and gender studies.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Gift exchange in view of diplomatic missions or dynastic marriages both within the Empire and with its neighbours
  • Visual evidence of the interaction between the Emperor and the Patriarch
  • Innovations in the visual agenda of the Palaiologan dynasty
  • Aspects of religious iconography and visual representations of theological controversies, i.e. Hesychasm
  • Artistic patronage and manuscript production as the outcome of dynastic and institutional interactions
  • Visual and material production as the outcome of political and social circumstances, i.e. the Zealot uprising or the Unionist policy
  • Evidence of artistic exchanges in the depictions of women, men, and children during the Palaiologan Era

 

Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello –axm570@bham.ac.uk

Organisers: Andrea Mattiello – University of Birmingham
Maria Alessia Rossi – The Courtauld Institute of Art