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CFP: Papal Patronage and Interventions at RSA Conference 2019

Papal Patronage and Interventions | Renaissance Society of America Annual Conference 2019 | Toronto, CA | 17-19 March, 2019

One of the several panels at next year’s RSA Annual Conference will be Papal Patronage and Interventions. From the Schism to the Counter-Reformation, the pope and his court are among the greatest patrons of early modern Europe, seizing upon art and literature as harbingers of Christian order, power, and prosperity. These commissions include a dazzling array of objects, ensembles, and spaces, ranging from miniature vessels to grand palaces – even the renovation of Saint Peter’s itself. We invite proposals for papers that examine the role of artistic and architectural activities in shaping the image, identity, and office of the papacy in the Renaissance. What were the visual, ecclesiastical, and political motors that inspired patterns of patronage? In what ways did these currents stimulate artistic response? What were the stakes of individual objects and monuments commissioned in this heady atmosphere? We conceive of subjects broadly, spanning the European continent from the thirteenth through the sixteenth century.

This panel is sponsored by the Association of Textual Scholarship in Art History.

Please send a short C.V. (no more than one page), a 150-word abstract, and a list of keywords to Tracy Cosgriff (tcosgriff@wooster.edu) and Sara Nair James (sjames@marybaldwin.edu) by July 15.

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CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Sociey of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

tumblr_oqexa0oz8t1syzcjgo1_500CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Society of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

Organised by: Maggie Crosland, Saida Bondini and Costanza Beltrami, PhD Candidates, The Courtauld Institute of Art

As (art) historians we often use documents as evidence. Indeed, what could offer us more direct information about an object, artwork or building than the records of the material used to construct it, or the payments for its labour?

And yet, the mechanisms through which uniquely useful documents such as inventories, contracts and payment accounts are produced are not always transparent. In fact, these are formulaic documents written within tight conventions, for specific economic or legal ends. In this session, we aim to investigate how these records came to be, how they relate to the objects they purportedly explain and how they influence our perception, analysis and conclusions on the past and its relics.

In proposing this session, we are interested in uncovering what documents hide. For example, a contract must often be the final product of a long and multiple discussion. As such, this document reduces the interaction of several people — masters, family members, advisors, apprentices etc. to the legal agreement between just two, effacing all the other voices as well as the temporal dimension of reflection, creation, and changes of mind.

A goal of this session is to provide a platform through which scholars of different media and geographic location can discuss the complexities and implications of relying on and using primary documents. As such, we are interested in paper proposals that engage with such documents from a range of standpoints.

Suggested topics include:

– The temporal and plural vision of the past as hidden or revealed through documents

– Establishing patron-artist networks through primary sources

– Implications of agency and patronage

– The bureaucratic nature of artist contracts and payment accounts

– Missing conversations – how to look beyond the one-to-one relationship suggested by contracts and payment accounts

–  Reconstructing the lost/missing archive

– Early modern and modern historiography on the use of primary sources

– What information remains hidden in the archive, and what is published and promoted instead? What does this tell us about our changing perception and efforts to shape the past?

To be considered for our panel, please email costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk with:

-The title of your proposed paper (15-word maximum)
– Abstract (150-word maximum)
– 5 keywords
– A very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum), formatted to the RSA’s standards.
Please note that the deadline for applications is June 4, 2017.