TOC: Art History and the Global Challenge. Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6,1

We are pleased to announce the publication of the new issue of the Artl@s Bulletin devoted to Art History and the Global Challenge. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/artlas/ For this special issue of the Artl@s Bulletin, we asked a diverse group of scholars to share with us their perspectives on the “Global turn” and the ways the “Digital turn” is affecting it.Continue reading “TOC: Art History and the Global Challenge. Artl@s Bulletin vol. 6,1”

#DAHRG keynote seminar: Transforming Art History in the Digital Revolution

Monday 12 June, 5:30 pm #DAHRG keynote seminar The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London Prof. Caroline Bruzelius (Duke University) Transforming Art History in the Digital Revolution The Courtauld’s new Digital Art History Research Group (#DAHRG) is pleased to welcome Professor Caroline Bruzelius to give the second of the group’s keynote seminar. The History ofContinue reading “#DAHRG keynote seminar: Transforming Art History in the Digital Revolution”

The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) 2017 Conference in The Vatican (7-9 June 2017)

The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) 2017 Conference in The Vatican is intended for a wide range of participants and interested parties, including digital image repository managers, content curators, software developers, scholars, and administrators at libraries, museums, cultural heritage institutions, software firms, and other organizations working with digital images and audio/visual materials. The conference willContinue reading “The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) 2017 Conference in The Vatican (7-9 June 2017)”

Digital library of liturgical sources

Digital library of liturgical sources is a new research tool developed by the Research Group of Liturgical History. The Calendar-Project is a comprehensive database of almost 200 representative European liturgical Calendars and Sanctorals. Through browsing Saints and Feasts or Dates respectively, one can gain a statistically relevant sample of where, when and which feasts were celebrated within the medieval territory of the Roman Rite.Continue reading “Digital library of liturgical sources”

CFP: Visual Resources, issue: Digital Art History

Deadline: Jul 1, 2017 <http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/ah/gvir-cfp-digital-art-history-1q2017&gt; Digital Art History – Where Are We Now? Special issue of Visual Resources In 2013, Visual Resources published a special issue devoted to Digital Art History. We recognize that since that date considerable activity has taken place in this area, which was then still in a phase of relative infancy. We feel thatContinue reading “CFP: Visual Resources, issue: Digital Art History”

Conference: Zur Typologie liturgischer Bücher des westlichen Mittelalters – Interdisziplinäres Symposium

7–9 July 2016 Large-scale digitization has lent urgency to an old and persistent question: the typology of liturgical books. The inadequacy of both medieval and modern labels to describe complex liturgical book types has rendered their succinct and accurate description in printed and online catalogues and repertories difficult, and this in turn has impeded systematicContinue reading “Conference: Zur Typologie liturgischer Bücher des westlichen Mittelalters – Interdisziplinäres Symposium”

CFP: Modelling Medieval Vaults symposium at the University of Liverpool in London, 14 July 2016.

Call for Papers: Modelling Medieval Vaults symposium University of Liverpool in London, Finsbury Square,  July 14, 2016. Deadline: 30 April 2016 The use of digital surveying and analysis techniques, such as laser scanning, photogrammetry, 3D reconstructions or reverse engineering offers the opportunity to re-examine historic works of architecture. In the context of medieval vaults, this hasContinue reading “CFP: Modelling Medieval Vaults symposium at the University of Liverpool in London, 14 July 2016.”

Visualizing Temporality: Modelling Time from the Textual Record

Visualizing Temporality: Modelling Time from the Textual Record Tuesday 25 March 2014, 6.30, Queen Mary University ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre, ArtsTwo Building, Mile End Campus What does time look like? We are all familiar with the standard timeline that measures out events with neat tick-marks, like the divisions on a ruler. Yet whilst very few of us reallyContinue reading “Visualizing Temporality: Modelling Time from the Textual Record”