Tag Archives: patronage

CFP: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

St. Anne’s College, Oxford, 28-30 June 2017

An international conference organised by the Faculty of English, University of Oxford, this event builds on the success of the 2009 Oxford conference, After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England, which resulted in a book of essays (ed. by Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh) that vigorously interrogated the nature of religious and intellectual culture in England in the long fifteenth century. After Chichele adopts a similar investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the Church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period, and it is expected that a wide range of literary and cultural artefacts will be considered, from single-authored works to manuscript compilations, from translations to original works, and from liturgy to art and architecture, with no constraints as to the conference’s likely outcomes and conclusions. It is intended that the conference should generate a volume of essays similar to After Arundel in scope, ambition and quality.

Plenary speakers: David Carlson, Mary Erler, Sheila Lindenbaum, Julian Luxford, David Rundle, Cathy Shrank.

Possible topics for discussion:
Religious writing and the English Church; the emergence of humanism and the fate of scholasticism; literature and the law; cultural and ecclesiastical patronage; developments in art and architecture; the liturgical life of the Church; the impact of the international book trade and of print; palaeography and codicology; the Church’s role in education, colleges and chantries; the impact of travel and pilgrimage.

Please send 500 word abstracts (for proposed 20-minute papers) by Friday, 12th August 2016 to Vincent Gillespie, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (vincent.gillespie@ell.ox.ac.uk).

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Call for papers: Between Heaven and Earth: Ecclesiastical Patronage in Europe, 1400-1600 (Courtauld Institute of Art, 9 May 2015)

Scenes from the Life of a Bishop, panel 1. Before c. 1520. Master of the von Groote Adoration © The Courtauld Institute of Art

Scenes from the Life of a Bishop, panel 1. Before c. 1520. Master of the von Groote Adoration © The Courtauld Institute of Art

Deadline for CFP, 2 February 2015

Third Annual Renaissance Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art

In recent years, the artistic commissions of ecclesiastic and lay patrons – both individual and collective – have been a fruitful area of scholarship. Research addressing issues of sacred space, devotional practice, and the materiality of extant objects has generated new insights into the artistic provisions made for patronal commemoration and salvation. Often, however, the interests of lay and ecclesiastical patrons have been considered separately, with a lesser focus on how the differences in their status mediated a shared pursuit of commemoration in death. Clerical patronage of art in Renaissance Europe allowed for an expression of political identity and dynastic power during life, but how did their status and role in society affect their choices for the afterlife? Were ecclesiastical patrons more acutely aware of a pressing need to make provision for their personal salvation than their lay counterparts? If so, was this reflected when commissioning commemorative or devotional art? Was the desire to secure a wider intercessory audience expressed more consciously or emphatically in the art of the clergy?

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which ecclesiastical patrons utilised devotional and commemorative art. Was there a dialogue between their individual selves and the institutions in which they chose to locate their foundations? Crucially, how do these foundations comment on ecclesiastical life and afterlife? By examining a category of patrons that was highly aware of devotional and commemorative practice, this conference seeks to gain a better understanding of art commissioned for churches by those appointed to participate in and lead them.
We welcome proposals, exploring material across the stated time span, throughout Europe. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • A re-assessment of the recent historiography and scholarship concerning patronage in an ecclesiastical environment, especially when this contrasts with contemporary lay patronage.
  • The relationship between patron and artist or patron and religious institution. 
  • Depiction of ecclesiastical donor and votive figures.
  • The implications of patronal choices of saints and iconography for the intended audience.
  • The role of inscriptions, signatures and heraldry in commemoration.
  • Reference to political stance and success in religious art.
  • Conceptions of heaven and the afterlife as expressed in art.
  • Ecclesiastical institutions prescribing limits to patrons and patronage.
  • Positioning of chapels and memorials in churches.
  • Rituals and liturgy of commemoration.
  • The impact of the Reformation and Counter Reformation on ecclesiastical patronage.

The Renaissance Symposium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities in the UK and abroad to present their research. Unfortunately, we cannot offer travel subsidies. Applicants from outside London are, therefore, encouraged to apply to other funding bodies for travel bursaries to attend the conference.

Abstracts for 15-20 minute papers, not exceeding 250 words, should be sent with a brief academic CV (100 words) to Lydia Hansell (lydia.hansell@courtauld.ac.uk) and Joost Joustra (joost.joustra@courtauld.ac.uk) no later than 2nd February 2015. Successful applicants will be notified by the 12th February 2015.

Organised by Lydia Hansell and Joost Joustra (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

CFP: Monastic Europe, Landscape and Settlement (Ennis, 22-25 August 2015)

Call for Papers:
Monastic Europe: Landscape and Settlement. International Conference
Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland, 22-25 August 2015 
Deadline: 28 November 2014

The Irish Research Council-funded Monastic Ireland: Landscape and Settlement project is a research partnership between the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin, the Discovery Programme and the Department of History, University College Cork. The project is examining the unusually well preserved remains of late medieval monastic buildings in Ireland within their broader European context, with a particular emphasis on their architecture and impact on the landscape around them.
Kilconnell

The project team is pleased to announce an international conference, to be held 22-25 August in Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland. Located in an area rich with the medieval buildings of the European monastic orders, the conference will balance sessions of papers with a number of site visits, and will stimulate a focused academic debate on the impact of monasticism in shaping the development of the physical environment across Europe between c. 1100 and c. 1700. Conference themes will include:

– The topography of medieval monastic settlement (1100-1700) in both urban and rural environments
– The impact of Church reforms on the physical structures and landscapes of monastic foundations
– Monastic space (liturgical, social, and architectural aspects)
– Patronage networks
– Architecture and identities
– Written sources for understanding the monastic environment

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers exploring this theme across the stated time span, throughout Europe. Papers may deal with either case studies or broader methodological questions, and are not limited to delivery in the English language.

Proposals for posters are also welcomed from doctoral students and early career scholars, and the conference organisers hope to have small subsidies available for accommodation costs>

Please send an email containing both your proposed title and an abstract of no more than 300 words to Dr Rachel Moss at rmoss@tcd.ie. If you intend for apply for a conference subsidy please indicate this on your proposal. Deadline for proposals is Friday, 28 November, 2104.

New Publication: Patronage, Power and Agency in Medieval Art

patronage-power-263x330COLUM HOURIHANE: Preface.
ELIZABETH CARSON PASTAN: Foreword.
COLUM HOURIHANE: Introduction.
JILL CASKEY: Medieval Patronage & Its Potentialities.
JULIAN LUXFORD: The Construction of English Monastic Patronage.
ELIZABETH CARSON PASTAN: Imagined Patronage: The Bayeux Embroidery & Its Interpretive History.
SHEILA BONDE; CLARK MAINES: The Heart of the Matter: Valois Patronage of the Charterhouse at Bourgfontaine.
CLAUDINE LAUTIER: The Canons of Chartes: Their Patronage and Representation in the Stained Glass Cathedral.
ANNE DERBES: Patronage, Gender & Generation in Late Medieval Italy: Fina Buzzacarini and the Baptistery of Padua.
BENJAMIN ZWEIG: Picturing the Fallen King: Royal Patronage & the Image of Saul’s Suicide.
NIGEL MORGAN: What are they Saying? Patrons & Their Text Scrolls in Fifteenth-Century English Art.
ROBIN CORMACK: ‘Faceless Icons’: The Problems of Patronage in Byzantine Art.
CORINE SCHLEIF: Seeking Patronage: Patrons & Motions in Language, Art, and Historiography.
ADELAIDE BENNETT: Issues of Female Patronage: French Books of Hours, 1220-1320.
STEPHEN PERKINSON: Portraits & Their Patrons: Reconsidering Agency in late Medieval Art.
LUCY FREEMAN SANDLER: The Bohun Women & Manuscript Patronage in Fourteenth-Century England.
ADEN KUMLER: The Patron-Function