Tag Archives: Holy Land

CFP: In Search of Crusader Art: Current Approaches and New Perspectives, 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin, 20-23 September 2017.

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 12.07.31CFP: In Search of Crusader Art: Current Approaches and New Perspectives, 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin, 20-23 September 2017.
Organizer: Ioanna Christoforaki (Athens)
Deadline: 31 October 2016

Although the concept of crusader art is effortlessly understood by scholars, its precise definition is notoriously elusive. Crusader art has traditionally been described as the figural art and architecture produced for the Crusaders in the Holy Land. The patrons were men and women, laymen as well as clergymen, who arrived to the Holy Land as pilgrims, soldiers, settlers, rulers, or merchants, while the artists were Franks and Italians who were residents in the Outremer, Westerners who travelled to the Latin East, or Eastern Christians who worked for Crusader patrons.
In recent decades, however, this conventional definition of crusader art has been challenged. Since it sits on the boundaries of many artistic traditions, its borders have become more porous. The centres of production have shifted beyond the Holy Land, to include places like Cyprus. From Sinai to Cilician Armenia, multifold artistic traditions have converged and numerous people have interacted in the production of what is recognised as crusader art.
The aim of this session is to reflect critically on the limitations of terminology, while addressing issues of artistic transmission across the fluid borderland of the Medieval Mediterranean. It will seek to expand the cultural dialogue between the various religious and ethnic groups in the Eastern Mediterranean, by examining how Islamic, Syrian and Jewish artistic traditions interacted with the Byzantine and Western paradigms. It will attempt to identify the varied forms of crusader art that have emerged in recent years and explore how this revised corpus of crusader material challenges accepted notions. Finally, it will inquire whether crusader art, as an essentially transcultural contact zone, acted as an agent of separation, communication, or convergence.
This session invites papers which re-evaluate traditional approaches to crusader art, artefacts and architecture and seek to re-examine the interplay between material culture, patrons and artists. Participants are expected to explore the artistic interaction between the different ethnic groups in the region and are encouraged to explore a novel approach in defining the notion of crusader art.

How to submit: Paper proposals of max. 1 paper are due by 31 October 2016. Send proposals at mail@mittelalterkongress.de

For more information, click here.

New Exhibition: Visions of Jerusalem: Medieval Christendom Imagines the City on a Hill @Les Enluminures, New York, September 16-November 12, 2016

enluminures to delete.pngLes Enluminures is pleased to present Visions of Jerusalem: Medieval Christendom Imagines the City on a Hill. The exhibition explores the representation of the Holy City in the images and imaginations of the Latin West and the rich diversity of its representation in both word and picture. It is conceived to coincide with the major inter-
national exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jerusalem 1000-1400, Every People Under Heaven, which scrutinizes through a much broader lens the impact Jerusalem had on the many cultural traditions that hold it dear: Eastern, Western, African, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, each with multiple identities and denominations.

Far from inspiring a consistent Christian conception of the Holy City, we show how Jerusalem prompted a vast range of depictions by Western authors and artists. In a time before cameras, images of Jerusalem were less concerned with veracity than with the power of their associations. The versatility of the Holy Land allowed it to act not only as the mise en scène for the Church’s rich biblical-mystical tradition, but also as a virtual destination for spiritual pilgrims and a touchstone in medieval apocalyptic traditions, among others. These varying visions of Jerusalem exemplify the fascinating complexity of the city. In the medieval mind, Jerusalem was both heavenly and earthly. It was a physical location and a mental construction that offered a link to the past and a harbinger of the future.

Highlights of the exhibition include a miniature depicting the Agony in the Garden from the Holy Land Choir Book, the long lost first volume of the Bible of Louis de Harcourt, Patriarch of Jerusalem and Bishop of Bayeux, a beautifully illustrated early gothic copy of Peter of Poitiers’ geneological scroll, and a deluxe book of hours with miniatures attributed to the Workshop of the Master François.

Place:
LES ENLUMINURES
23 East 73rd Street, 7th Floor, Penthouse, New York, NY 10021

Dates:
September 16th through November 12th, 2016

Hours:
Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 6pm

Contact information:
Adrienne Albright / +1 212 717 7273 / newyork@lesenluminures.com

CfP: Memory and Identity in the Middle Ages: The Construction of a Cultural Memory of the Holy Land in the 4th-16th centuries (26-27 May 2016, Amsterdam)

An interdisciplinary conference, 26 & 27 May 2016

The Holy Land has played an important role in the definition of the identities of the three major
Abrahamic religions. Constitutive narratives about the past of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam were
largely bound to this shared and contested space. As put forward both by Maurice Halbwachs and Jan Assmann, memory adheres to what is ‘solid’, stored away in outward symbols. The Holy Land is a focal point around which the shared memories of these different groups formed, and has been crucial for defining their identities. Accordingly, the definition of this shared memory can be traced as a process of elaborating a cultural memory: an ‘artificial’ construction of developed traditions, transmissions and transferences. This process of construction was pursued through different media that cast the past into symbols. The period between the age of Constantine and the late Renaissance was formative for constructing this memory. It saw the valorization of Christian holy places under Constantine, the birth of Islam, the construction of an important Jewish scholarly community in the Holy Land, the Crusades, the massive growth of late medieval pilgrimage involving Jewish, Christian and Islamic groups, as well as other crucial events.
The conference aims to bring together scholars who study the memories of the holy places
within these religious galaxies from various disciplinary perspectives, in order to achieve a constructive exchange of ideas. Scholars of all so-called Abrahamic religions are invited to submit proposals, including scholars of Western and Eastern Christianity, Judaism and Islam. The call is open for historians, art historians, literary scholars, theologians, philosophers working on topics ranging from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance.

This conference is organized by the team of the research project Cultural Memory and Identity in the Late Middle Ages: the Franciscans of Mount Zion in Jerusalem and the Representation of the Holy Land (1333-1516): Michele Campopiano, Valentina Covaci, Guy Geltner and Marianne Ritsema van Eck. The project is funded by the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO).
Papers should be 30 minutes long, and will be followed by 15 minutes of discussion. Participants are
asked to send an abstract of 300 words to memory.and.identity.conference@gmail.com before December 2015, together with information concerning their academic affiliation. Travel costs and two nights of accommodation will be financed by the project. Please do not hesitate to contact us for
additional information.

CFP: Sharing the Holy Land: Perceptions of Shared Sacred Spaces (London, June 12-13 & Leeds, July 6-9, 2015)

Call for Papers:
Sharing the Holy Land: Perceptions of Shared Sacred Spaces
International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2015
Deadline: 12 September 2014

A symposium, Sharing the Holy Land: Perceptions of Shared Sacred Space in the Medieval and Early Modern Eastern Mediterranean will be held at The Warburg Institute, in London on 12-13 June 2015, featuring keynote speakers, Prof. Bernard Hamilton, Prof. Benjamin Kedar, and Prof. Ora Limor. See http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia-2014-15/sharing-the-holy-land/ for information.
detail-of-middle-eastholy-land-on-mainz-world-map-c-1110

Following on this, three sessions are being organized for the International Medieval Conference to be held at Leeds on 6-9 July, 2015. The three sessions seek to address how both Western pilgrims, and the indigenous Christian, Jewish, and Muslim Levantine populations perceived the sharing of religious shrines with other faiths. Of particular interest is how this sharing was described and explained in contemporary accounts and how this influenced the knowledge of other faiths among the Semitic religions. These sessions will focus on the period from c.1000 to c.1500, addressing the changing political context in the Levant and its influence on the sharing of sacred space.

Please send proposals for papers (title & 100 words abstract) to Jan Vandeburie at sharingtheholyland2015@gmail.com before 12 September 2014.

BBC Two: Pilgrimage

l43-vaticano-110818192541_bigBBC2: Pilgrimage with Simon Reeve

For centuries pilgrimage was one of the greatest adventures on earth, involving epic journeys across the country and around the world. This series sees Simon Reeve retrace the exciting adventures of our ancestors. He learns about the forgotten aspects of pilgrimage, including the vice, thrills and dangers that all awaited travellers. He explores the faith, the hopes, desires, and even the food that helped to keep medieval travellers on the road.

1st Episode Simon Reeve embarks on pilgrimages across Britain, from Holy Island to Canterbury.

2nd Episode Simon Reeve travels from northern France to Spain, then crosses western Europe to Rome.

3rd Episode Simon Reeve travels from Istanbul across the Holy Land to Jerusalem.

For more information see http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01kqjg3