CFP: Medieval Passions and Proclivities

Medieval Passions and Proclivities

Southeastern Medieval Association, 2020 Conference
Spartanburg, South Carolina
November 5-7, 2020
Hosted by Wofford and Converse Colleges

Plenary Speakers:
Michelle M. Sauer, University of North Dakota
Wan-Chuan Kao, Washington and Lee University

sf17-190-173bs1
Casket with Scenes from Romances, ca. 1310–30, Paris, France, elephant ivory, Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917; The Cloisters Collection, 1988, 17.190.173a, b; 1988.16

The Southeastern Medieval Association (SEMA) will hold its 2020 conference on November 5-7, 2020, with the theme of “Medieval Passions and Proclivities.” Proposals are welcome for individual papers, whole sessions, or round tables on the conference theme. Papers might consider any interpretation of medieval passions, interests, habits and obsessions, both religious and secular, and may include the impact or permutations of such passions in later periods.

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Index of Medieval Art open to all until June 1, 2020

index-medieval-art-e1520780221849We are all aware that researchers, students, curators, and others in the field are adjusting to new (and at times difficult) working conditions due to COVID-19. In light of this, the Index of Medieval Art by Princeton University is now open-access until June 1, 2020.

The database can be accessed at https://theindex.princeton.edu/.  Take advantage of this free resource for your research needs until June 1.

Deadline extended! CFP: (In)materiality in Medieval Art

(IN)MATERIALITY IN MEDIEVAL ART

The deadline for submitting communication proposals is extended until May 15, 2020. Authors will be notified of the outcome by 1 June 2020.

https://www.ucm.es/historiadelarte/14thjornadasmedieval

 

1594-2020-01-11-Cartel congreso61Ovid’s aphorism “Materiam superabat opus”, evoked throughout the Middle Ages and beyond, reveals the special consideration given to skill, technique and craft in the artistic creation processes. Thus, ingenuity and mastery have been privileged qualities in our approach to works of art, according to a restricted vision assumed by Art History as a discipline. However, both the aesthetic reflections and the documents related to artistic commissions in the Middle Ages show the great importance given to the material and sensory aspects of artefacts and monuments. In line with this perception, once again valued in light of the «material turn» of the discipline in the last decades, the 14th Jornadas Complutenses de Arte Medieval propose to focus on materiality as an essential factor in the artistic production, as well as on the poetics of immateriality and the intangible condition of the aesthetic experience.

 

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Call for articles: Eikón / Imago

Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid are looking for articles for their journal.

Eikon Imago CFP

Edited by the CAPIRE Research Team, Eikón / Imago Scientific Journal is an annual academic publication whose research interest focuses on iconography and visual culture, from a thematic scope that encompasses the forms and meanings of the images of any era, culture or country, as well as any thematic, typological or disciplinary variant: religious, mythological, political, musical, fantastic, animalistic and other.

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One Year Later: Notre Dame

On April 15, 2019, the cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris caught fire. The world watched as one of its most beloved medieval monuments burned. We were all reminded that not only is it a miracle that medieval architecture has survived into the 21st century, but that art and architecture (like all other tangible, material things) can very rapidly be destroyed.

In response to this devastating fire and the questions it raised about conservation and restoration of medieval art and architecture, Sam Fogg and Luhring Augustine hosted Gothic Spirit: Medieval Art from Europe, a one-day conference held in New York City in January 2020. Gothic Spirit brought together academics, curators, art dealers, collectors, and conservators to discuss the delicate issues of conservation and restoration. How far do we go to preserve the past? What is too much restoration? How are these issues addressed and perceived by politicians and society at large? The conference began with a presentation by Dr. Alexandra Gajewski on the current status of restoration at Notre Dame.

The full conference is now available to watch on Luhring Augustine’s website. To watch the conference sessions, click here.

Screen Shot 2020-04-15 at 4.23.54 PM

 

For more information on Notre Dame, especially how restoration efforts have been affected by the novel coronavirus, you can read these resources:

Wall Street Journal: One Year After Fire, Notre Dame’s Rebuild Is in Limbo

The Guardian: One year after Notre Dame fire, officials struggle to keep restoration on track

The Telegraph: Notre-Dame fire: one year on from the devastating blaze

The New York Times: Marking Notre-Dame Fire in a Locked-Down Paris

Additionally, you can also visit the ICMA’s Notre Dame de Paris page for resources and information from scholars in the field.

 

Deadline extended! CFP: Manufacturing the Past

Manufacturing the Past

The Department of Art History of the European University, St. Petersburg
October 8 – 10, 2020
Due April 20, 2020  Due June 10, 2020

In 2018 the international conference History and Its Images, organized by the Department of Art History of the European University at St. Petersburg, was dedicated to Francis Haskell’s seminal book of the same title, which greatly influenced the study of the visualization of the past. In 2020 we will host a second conference on the representation of the past in the arts and visual culture.Among the questions to be discussed are: how the visual arts and visual culture produce images of the past, how these images were perceived by the different communities and how they were transformed by the national context of their production.

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CFP: On Materiality and the Virtual (a virtual symposium)

On Materiality and the Virtual

Virtual Symposium, NYU University
May 1, 2020
Due April 15, 2020

 

Following on last year’s theme Out of Place / Out of Time, the Medieval and Renaissance Graduate Student Interdisciplinary Network (MARGIN) is proud to announce the theme of our 2020 MARGIN Symposium: Materiality and the Virtual. The Symposium will take place virtually via Zoom on May 1. A link for the symposium will be sent out closer to time.

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CFP: Manufacturing the Past

Manufacturing the Past

The Department of Art History of the European University, St. Petersburg
October 8 – 10, 2020
Due April 20, 2020

In 2018 the international conference History and Its Images, organized by the Department of Art History of the European University at St. Petersburg, was dedicated to Francis Haskell’s seminal book of the same title, which greatly influenced the study of the visualization of the past. In 2020 we will host a second conference on the representation of the past in the arts and visual culture.Among the questions to be discussed are: how the visual arts and visual culture produce images of the past, how these images were perceived by the different communities and how they were transformed by the national context of their production.

Continue reading “CFP: Manufacturing the Past”

CFP: Within and Without the Manuscript

Within and without the manuscript: interactions between illumination and the other arts

Université de Lausanne

October 22nd-23rd, 2020

Due April 19, 2020

Since at least the 1960s, book illumination has been fully recognized as an important sector of the arts and as an integral part of the historical studies of the book. The study of this branch takes place not only in libraries and archives, but also in universities, with dedicated chairs and specific journals, as well as its own research institutes and congresses. However, the increasing specialisation should not make us forget that this field of artistic production has never been isolated from the others.

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Medieval Art History resource Facebook group

As many of us have found during this surreal time we’re currently living in, all those books and articles we wish we had picked up a copy or scanned is now an almost impossible task. With the closing of libraries, I wanted to bring to researcher’s attention to a new Facebook group that has been created to help students and researchers access any material that they may need.

Join the community of medieval art historians/ architectural historians/archaeologists who are happy to help out one another in accessing each other’s libraries (electronic & paper). Need a chapter of a book that you can’t get your hands on? Post in the group and hopefully someone will have that very book sitting on their bookshelf.

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/219211206103525/

In addition to this, The British Archaeological Association has created a request platform where you can also request items (The BAA has a lot of people who don’t use Facebook so this is another great resource!): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zgD8ProWOc8nrhk7_sm_LXL1eSGfdaOZGL2b50W8ZAY/edit?usp=sharing&fbclid=IwAR3d3rOBpq2ua1ENtScWXhJci1X4g9SgNKTJSMzdmIZO_GetmEwpm-g0UeM