Tag Archives: St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies

Conference: Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, St Andrews Uni, 13-14 September 2019

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place at the University of St Andrews on 13-14 September 2019, and is jointly held by the School of Art History, SAIMS and the University’s Special Collections Division. Please send all queries to medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Friday 13 September  [Venue: Napier Reading Room, Martyrs Kirk, North Street]

14:00 Emily Savage: word of welcome

14:15 Rachel Hart (University of St Andrews Library, Special Collections): “The surviving evidence of medieval collecting, curating and assembling to be found in the Library of the University of St Andrews”

15:00-16:00: Handling session in Special Collections with Rachel Hart

17:15: Keynote lecture: Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) [Venue: School 3 on the Quad]:

“History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in Church Collections, c. 800-1300”

18:30: Conference dinner [Venue TBA]

 

Saturday 14 Sept [Venue for all sessions: Parliament Hall, South Street]

8:30-9: Coffee

9:00-10:45 Morning session  1: Relics and reliquaries – Chair: Kate Rudy

Juliette Calvarin (Harvard University): “Afterlives of Funeral Palls in the Sacristy (St. Thomas’, Prague, c. 1410)”

Ashley West (Temple University): “Heiltumsbücher and Artistic Authority in an Early Visual Archive”

Sarina Kursteiner (Columbia University): “Notarial Acts as Sacred Matter: Bolognese Notaries and their Images in the Archive, 1290-1303”

10:45-11: Coffee and comfort break

11:00-12:45 Morning session  2: Treasuries – Chair: Emily Savage

Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto): “Reflecting a Golden Age: The Material Composition of History in the Treasuries of the Late Medieval Maasland”

Marta Simões & Joana Antunes (CEAACP-GEMA, University of Coimbra): “Reading the Space, Listing the Riches: The Old Cathedral of Coimbra and its Medieval Inventories”

Zachary Stewart (Texas A&M University): “The St Peter Mancroft Inventory: Register, Record, Teaching Resource”

12:45- 2:00 Lunch

14:00-15:45: Afternoon session 1: Manuscripts as Archives – Chair: Julian Luxford

Kathleen Wilson Ruffo (Royal Ontario Museum): “Curating Cultural Capital: A little-known Dutch Psalter as Diplomatic Archive”

Shannon Wearing (UCLA): “The ‘Eternal Memory of Great Things’: Illustrated Secular Cartularies of the Twelfth Century,from Bavaria to Barcelona”

Orly Amit (Tel Aviv University): “Appropriating the Archive: Promoting Legitimacy and Shaping Historical Memory through the Library of John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford”

15:45-16:00 Coffee and comfort break

16:00-17:45: Afternoon session 2: Storing the Archive  Chair: Rachel Hart

Diego Belmonte-Fernandez (Universidad de Sevilla): “Collecting, curating and remembering in the Cathedral of Seville: a portable written archive from the fifteenth century”

Rafael Ceballos-Roa & María del Carmen Rodríguez-López (Universidad de León): “The B-side of the parchment: two medieval monastic archives from the kingdom of León”

Amélie Marineau-Pelletier (University of Ottawa and École des hautes études en sciences sociales): “The Locus Credibilis and the Making of Urban Authority: Preserving the Written Word in Metz (14th-15th Centuries)”

Ending around 18:00

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CFP: St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference (6-8 June, 2019)

St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference

6 – 8 June, 2019

Deadline: 31 March, 2019

K104208

The British Library, Egerton 2899, Psalter of the Gallican Version, Scotland, 15th century, f. 30, detail.

We are announcing a call for papers for the second St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) Graduate Conference. This three-day conference is aimed at graduate students and early career researchers in any area of Medieval Studies. The second day of the conference will be devoted to the theme Politics and Political Thought and we would particularly welcome abstracts related to this topic from scholars working in any of the fields mentioned below. We aim to encompass a range of historical perspectives, from art to archeology, law to literature.

The keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Carole Hillenbrand (Edinburg & St Andrews) and Dr Charles West (Sheffield).

Proposals relating to the following fields of research are especially welcome:

  • Eastern Mediterranean studies
  • Art and architecture
  • The church and religious life
  • Crusading
  • Late Antiquity
  • Latin poetry
  • Law
  • Middle Eastern studies
  • Philosophy
  • Rulership and lordship
  • Scottish history
  • Texts and manuscripts

It is anticipated that there shall be no registration free and that some travel bursaries will be available. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length.

Please email 250-word abstracts to saimsgraduateconference@gmail.com by 31st March 2019.

Call for Papers: Re/Generate – Medieval materiality and reuse (St Andrews, 6-7 May 2016)

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Deadline for submissions: 1 February 2016

The University of St Andrews School of Art History in collaboration with the St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) present

Re/generate: Materiality and the Afterlives of Things in the Middle Ages, 500-1500

an interdisciplinary conference on reuse and recycling in medieval Europe taking place on 6-7th May 2016.

In recent years, the discipline of Art History has been grappling with the concept of materiality, the very thingness of art. The material of medieval art, be it parchment, precious metal, gem, bone or stone, has emerged as a spearheading topic. Unsurprisingly, this “material turn” has prompted intriguing questions. To what extent does an ivory figure of the Virgin and Child embody the divine, rather than merely represent it? What exactly did pilgrims do with the holy dust or liquid which they carried away from saints’ shrines in little ampullae? It is within this context that we wish to explore how recycling was part of the medieval (re)creative process.

This conference will investigate the different ways in which medieval people used and reused goods, materials, and other elements from existing forms to create (or recreate) new art and architecture. Why did medieval people preserve, conserve, and recycle art and materials from a different era? Did such appropriation go beyond mere economic practicality? Could the very materiality of an object have been the reason for its retention or reinvention? The two-day conference is aimed at postgraduates and early career academics from a range of disciplines including, but not limited to history, art history, museum studies, archaeology, book studies and literature.

We invite twenty-minute papers on the following range of topics and their relationship to the study of materiality, recycling and reuse in middle ages:

  • Second-hand materiality of medieval art and/or everyday objects
  • The concept of refuse/garbage and its reuse
  • The medieval and post-medieval afterlives of things
  • Theoretical approaches to medieval materiality
  • Thing theory and Stuff theory
  • Semiotics and anthropology of medieval recycling and recreation
  • Issues of authorship, circulation and ownership of recycled art
  • Genealogy of recycled materials: spoils, heirlooms, relics, ruins and
    remnants
  • Conservation, preservation and restoration in medieval thought and
    practice

Papers on other issues related to the study of materiality and reuse of materials in the Middle Ages or of medieval materials in post medieval practice are also welcome.

Please direct your submissions (250 word abstract) along with a short biography (100 word) to regenerate2016@st-andrews.ac.uk no later than 1st of February 2016.

Conference website regenerate2016.wordpress.com

Donald Bullough Fellowship 2014/15

topbannerleft-2The St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies invites applications for the Donald Bullough Fellowship in Mediaeval History, to be taken up during either semester of the academic year 2014-15. The closing date for applications is 31 March 2014.

The Fellowship is open to any academic in a permanent university post with research interests in mediaeval history. The financial aspect of the fellowship is a subsidy (up to £3000) towards the cost of travel to St Andrews and accommodation during your stay. Previous Fellows have included Dr Christina Pössel, Professor Cynthia Neville, Dr Ross Balzaretti, Dr Marlene Hennessy, Professor Warren Brown.  The fellowship is currently held by Dr Edward Coleman.

The Fellowship carries with it no teaching duties, though the Fellow is expected to take part in the normal seminar life of the mediaeval historians during their stay in St Andrews. Weekly seminars, held on a Monday evening, run from September – December, and February – May. You will also be invited to lead a workshop on your chosen research theme during your stay. Fellows are provided with computing facilities and an office alongside the mediaeval historians in the Institute. The university library has an excellent collection for mediaeval historians.

You should send a letter of application by the advertised closing date, together with a scheme of research for the project on which you will be engaged during your time in St Andrews.  You should also enclose a CV, together with the names of two academic referees, who should be asked to write by the closing date. All correspondence should be addressed to saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk