Tag Archives: University of Leeds

CFP: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018

avila-753643_1920Call for Papers: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018
Deadline: 1 February 2018

Few topics in medieval studies have as much current relevance and activity as frontiers and borders. Yet approaches to their study in the Middle Ages are often untheorised, and
compare, if at all, only to often outdated studies of the ancient or modern world. Yet
medievalists are well placed, given the richness of their material and the complexity of
medieval politics and society, to challenge such ‘classical’ ideas of The Frontier, whose
weaknesses are now being exposed by current events. A fully comparative approach to the possibilities of what it meant to establish, live in or contest a frontier or border zone shown by the societies of late Antiquity and the Middle Ages can power the development of a new shared understanding of the processes at work where borders are laid down or transgressed.

The project Rethinking the Medieval Frontier has been exploring such ideas since 2015. Its first one-day conference, made possible by a British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Small Research Grant, will take place on 10th April 2018. Scholars at all levels working on frontiers and borders within the period 100-1500 CE, in any geographical area, are invited to offer papers addressing questions such as these:
§ Who defines or defined a frontier, and with what effect?
§ How did the medieval understanding of the world envisage or describe frontiers?
§ How was a frontier physically constituted?
§ Did military frontiers differ from other sorts of border, and if so how?
§ How do archaeologists’ views of medieval frontiers compare to those of historians?
§ What persons or groups crossed medieval borders, and why? Who was prevented from
doing so, and how effectively?
§ What persons or groups lived in border zones, for what reasons?
§ How far did frontiers and borders create or inform medieval identities?
§ How do the insights of other disciplines studying frontiers apply to medieval societies,
and how do medievalist disciplines differ in their study of frontiers?
Papers should be up to 15 minutes long and may be exploratory or experimental.
Comparison of more than one medieval society is encouraged. Titles and abstracts should be received by 1st February 2018. It may not be possible to accept all submissions. Some travel bursaries are available to allow attendance which might otherwise not be possible, including from outside the UK.
Submissions, as well as any other queries, should be sent to Jonathan Jarrett, School of History, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, j.jarrett@leeds.ac.uk.

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Call for Papers/Sessions: International Medieval Congress “Reform and Renewal” (Leeds 2015)

Call for Papers/Call for Sessions:
Reform and Renewal
International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 6-9 July 2015

Deadline for paper proposals: 31 August 2014
Deadline for session proposals: 30 September 2014

leeds

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of medieval studies. Papers and sessions on any topic or theme in the European Middle Ages are welcome. Each Congress has one particular special thematic strand on an area of interdisciplinary study in a wider context. However, this strand is not intended to be exclusive and submissions from all spheres of medieval research, in any major European language, are welcome.

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a specific special thematic strand which – for 2015 – is ‘Reform and renewal’. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as its impact on many aspects of the human experience.

The changes brought about by deliberate individual and collective interventions demonstrate the impact of reform and renewal on the development of spirituality, ideologies, institutional and socio-economic realities, literary and artistic expression, and a sense of shared identity amongst communities. Change could be justified by referring rhetorically to a ‘restoration’ or ‘renewal’ of a perceived former reality. Monastic and ecclesiastical groups regarded spiritual and institutional reform as closely interconnected. Secular rulers invoked divine will and natural order to validate interventions in political and socio-economic structures. Innovators in literary and artistic spheres referred to a desire to return to a more ‘authentic’ or ‘original’ intellectual, spiritual, or aesthetic experience. In reality, reform and renewal could be profoundly radical but could also be more ambiguous, remaining virtually unnoticed by contemporaries. Medieval commentators’ tendency to append positive and negative connotations to accounts of reform and renewal continues to impact upon modern discussions of both phenomena and their rhetorical uses.

Areas of discussion could include:

  • Justifications for reform by ruling or dissident groups (e.g. oligarchies, heretics, parliaments)
  • Memories of reform: historiographical justifications
  • Changing evaluations of reform and renewal: medieval commentaries and modern scholarship
  • Relevance of reform and renewal as terms to describe change across different periods, regions, social layers, and landscapes
  • Renewal without reform: intentional change that was not presented as a reform
  • The individual as agent of reform/renewal: charismatic leaders, innovators, and bureaucratic reformers
  • Collectivities as agents of reform and renewal
  • Significance and/or impact of individual, social, political, and institutional reform/renewal as well as impact on individuals and societies
  • Religious and/or ideological renewal
  • Reform and renewal in literary and artistic production: genre and style reforms, reformist literature
  • Reform and renewal in manuscript production, translation, and dissemination
  • Medieval rhetorics of reform and renewal
  • Physical remains of reform or renewal: architecture, texts, iconography
  • Reform as renovation or continuity: maintaining continuation of structures, continuation of knowledge, or ‘Back to basics’
  • Reform in education / moral renewal

Proposals should be submitted online at www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2015_call.html
The online proposal form will be available from 1 May 2014. Paper proposals must be submitted by 31 August 2014; session proposals must be submitted by 30 September 2014.

The IMC welcomes session and paper proposals submitted in all major European languages. For further details please contact:

Axel E. W. Müller
International Medieval Congress
Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Parkinson Building 1.03, LEEDS  LS2 9JT  U.K.
Tel.: +44 (113) 343-3614  Fax: +44 (113) 343-3616
email: imc@leeds.ac.uk
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/imc