Tag Archives: frontier

CFP: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018

avila-753643_1920Call for Papers: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018
Deadline: 1 February 2018

Few topics in medieval studies have as much current relevance and activity as frontiers and borders. Yet approaches to their study in the Middle Ages are often untheorised, and
compare, if at all, only to often outdated studies of the ancient or modern world. Yet
medievalists are well placed, given the richness of their material and the complexity of
medieval politics and society, to challenge such ‘classical’ ideas of The Frontier, whose
weaknesses are now being exposed by current events. A fully comparative approach to the possibilities of what it meant to establish, live in or contest a frontier or border zone shown by the societies of late Antiquity and the Middle Ages can power the development of a new shared understanding of the processes at work where borders are laid down or transgressed.

The project Rethinking the Medieval Frontier has been exploring such ideas since 2015. Its first one-day conference, made possible by a British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Small Research Grant, will take place on 10th April 2018. Scholars at all levels working on frontiers and borders within the period 100-1500 CE, in any geographical area, are invited to offer papers addressing questions such as these:
§ Who defines or defined a frontier, and with what effect?
§ How did the medieval understanding of the world envisage or describe frontiers?
§ How was a frontier physically constituted?
§ Did military frontiers differ from other sorts of border, and if so how?
§ How do archaeologists’ views of medieval frontiers compare to those of historians?
§ What persons or groups crossed medieval borders, and why? Who was prevented from
doing so, and how effectively?
§ What persons or groups lived in border zones, for what reasons?
§ How far did frontiers and borders create or inform medieval identities?
§ How do the insights of other disciplines studying frontiers apply to medieval societies,
and how do medievalist disciplines differ in their study of frontiers?
Papers should be up to 15 minutes long and may be exploratory or experimental.
Comparison of more than one medieval society is encouraged. Titles and abstracts should be received by 1st February 2018. It may not be possible to accept all submissions. Some travel bursaries are available to allow attendance which might otherwise not be possible, including from outside the UK.
Submissions, as well as any other queries, should be sent to Jonathan Jarrett, School of History, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, j.jarrett@leeds.ac.uk.

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Call for Participants: Summer Intensive Course ‘Luminosus Limes’ (Budapest 2014)

Call for Participants:
Summer Intensive Course  – Luminosus Limes:
Geographical, Ethnic, Social and Cultural Frontiers in Late Antiquity
Central European University, Budapest, 7-12  July, 2014
Deadline: 14 February, 2014

ceu_budapest

What is a frontier? Does it serve to separate or to link countries, peoples, classes, ideas?   Frontiers have become increasingly significant in the study of Late Antiquity, the fastest growing historical discipline, as scholars recognized the fundamental importance of shifting barriers in the process of transformation that led from the classical to the post-classical world. People living in the Roman world between the second and the sixth century tore down many walls demarcating cultures, religions, ethnicities. Frontiers once firmly separating empires, ethnic groups, religions, friends and even the sexes have been intensely crossed in late antiquity – a phenomenon comparable only to the recent transition from modernity to post-modernity — a comparison that we intend to exploit in our methodology.

The “Bright Frontier” summer course explores the dynamic transformation of classical frontiers between the second and the sixth century from a multidisciplinary perspective: archaeology, medieval studies, social and cultural history, art, theology, and literature. Offering a groundbreaking approach to the field of border studies including social, gender, ethnic and religious categories with the participation of outstanding scholars in the field, this course will provide students with a solid knowledge of up-to-date international scholarship on frontiers: a strong theoretical background as well as hands-on acquaintance with physical borders and material artefacts excavated along the Danube River (the ripa Pannonica) as well as in the late antique cemetery of Pécs in Hungary.

For more information, see: http://www.summer.ceu.hu/limes-2014