Tag Archives: Hungary

Conference Programme: Minority Influences in Medieval Society, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, November 25-26, 2016

tumblr_mpkos7mo2o1ssmm02o1_1280Conference Programme: Minority Influences in Medieval Society, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, November 25-26, 2016.

Friday 25 November

9.45 Welcome (Nora Berend)

Session 1. 10-11.15

Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg) Influences of mudejar spirituality on majority Christian religious life

Teresa Shawcross (Princeton) Ethno-religious Minorities and the Shaping of Byzantine Society during the Crusades

COFFEE

Session 2. 11.30-12.45

Annette Kehnel (Mannheim) Minority language, minority culture, minority tradition: Who exactly cares?

Amira Bennison (Cambridge) The Berber imprint on the medieval Maghrib

LUNCH

Session 3.  14.15-15.30

Ana Echevarría (Madrid) Reinventing law codes under foreign conditions: influence, adaptation or endurance in the Iberian peninsula

Eduard Mühle (Münster)  Real and perceived influence of minority groups in medieval Poland (12th-13th c)

COFFEE

Session 4. 16-18 Eva Haverkamp (München) Jews in the high medieval economy: how to evaluate their role

István Petrovics (Szeged) The Role of “Latin”  Guests in the Economic Life and Urban Development of Medieval Hungary

James Barrett (Cambridge) Northern Peoples and Medieval European Trade: Locating Agency

 

Saturday 26 November

Session 1. 9.30-10.45

Przemysław Wiszewski (Wrocław) Cultural turn in 12th-14th c. Silesia: how the German-speaking minority became the cultural majority

Luciano Gallinari (Cagliari) Catalans in Sardinia and the transformation of Sardinians into a political minority

COFFEE

Session 2. 11.15-12.30

Matthias Hardt (Leipzig) Western immigrants in High Medieval Bohemia

Katalin Szende (Budapest) Iure Theutonico? German settlers, local rulers, and legal frameworks for immigration to medieval East Central Europe  LUNCH

Supported by the DAAD Cambridge Research Hub with funds from the German
Federal Foreign Office (FFO)

How to register: To register for the conference, please email Dr Nora Berend, nb213@cam.ac.uk and send a cheque for £ 7 (or the appropriate cost for one day; an optional charge for lunch can also be added, see below) to her to St Catharine’s College, Cambridge CB2 1RL. Cheques must be made payable to St Catharine’s College. Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Registration is £4 for Friday and £3 for Saturday; this is to cover the cost of refreshments during the day. Coffe, tea and biscuits will be available.

Lunch will ONLY be provided for those who order and pay £12 by 10 November, but it will be possible instead to leave during the lunch break to get some food in town.

 

Symposium: Modelling Medieval Vaults

cropped-Pixel-bw-1The use of digital surveying and analysis techniques, such as laser scanning, photogrammetry, 3D reconstructions or reverse engineering offers the opportunity to re-examine historic architecture.

Digital analysis has enabled new research into design processes, construction methods, structural engineering, building archaeology and relationships between buildings. Recent research on Continental European and Central American architecture has established the significance of these techniques, however, as yet there has been little exploitation of digital technologies in the context of medieval architecture in the British Isles. This is despite international recognition of the importance of thirteenth and fourteenth-century English vault design to the history of Gothic architecture in an international context.

The aims of the present symposium are to present new research in this emerging field to establish appropriate methodologies using digital tools and identify significant questions for future research in the area.

The symposium will be relevant to anyone with an interest in:

  • Medieval architecture
  • Three-dimensional digital methodologies
  • Digital techniques used for the analysis of historic works of architecture

Programme

09:00   Welcome (tea and coffee)

09:30   Introduction
09:40   Keynote: Norbert Nussbaum, Thomas Bauer and Jörg Lauterbach: Benedikt Ried’s Deconstructive Vaults in Prague Castle – Design, Construction and Meaning
10:30   Tea and coffee break

Digital processes 1
10:50   Carmen Pérez de los Ríos: Researching tas-de-charge Design and Construction Methods: an Approach Supported by Digital Techniques
11:10   Danilo Di Mascio: Morphological and geometric complexities of built heritage
11:30   Marco Carpiceci and Fabio Colonnese: Medieval vaults for Renaissance architecture. Modelling the vaults on sheet 10 of Leonardo da Vinci’s Code B
11:50   Enrique Rabasa-Díaz, Ana López-Mozo, Miguel Ángel Alonso-Rodríguez and Rafael Martín-Talaverano: Technical knowledge transfer in European Late Gothic: multi-star vaults
12:10   Questions
12:20   Keynote: Santiago Huerta: Cracks and distortions in masonry arches and vaults
13:10 Lunch break (lunch provided)

New questions in 14th-century vaulting
13:50   Nick Webb: Wells cathedral choir aisle vaults: digital documentation and analysis
14:05   Alex Buchanan: Wells cathedral choir aisle vaults: issues of interpretion
14:20   Andrew Budge: Design changes: the macro- and micro-architectural vaults of fourteenth-century collegiate churches
14:40   Sophie Dentzer-Niklasson: From Two to Three Dimensions: Drawings and Design Processes in Medieval Vaulting
15:00   Questions
15:10   Tea and coffee break

Digital processes 2
15:30   Rosana Guerra and Paula Fuentes: The construction of the vaults of Mallorca cathedral
15:50   Weiyi Pei and Lui Tam: Comparison of Digital Documentation Methodologies of Neo-gothic Vaulting System: A Case Study of Dominican Church, Ghent, Belgium
16:10   Balázs Szőke, Balázs Szakonyi and Gergely Buzás: Role of the “Horizontal ribs” in late gothic vault constructions in Hungary.
16:30   Questions
16:40   Keynote: Benjamin Ibarra-Sevilla Mixtec Stonecutting Artistry; Documentation and Visualization of Late Gothic Ribbed Vaults in Southern Mexico

Book here.

Call for Participants: Summer Intensive Course ‘Luminosus Limes’ (Budapest 2014)

Call for Participants:
Summer Intensive Course  – Luminosus Limes:
Geographical, Ethnic, Social and Cultural Frontiers in Late Antiquity
Central European University, Budapest, 7-12  July, 2014
Deadline: 14 February, 2014

ceu_budapest

What is a frontier? Does it serve to separate or to link countries, peoples, classes, ideas?   Frontiers have become increasingly significant in the study of Late Antiquity, the fastest growing historical discipline, as scholars recognized the fundamental importance of shifting barriers in the process of transformation that led from the classical to the post-classical world. People living in the Roman world between the second and the sixth century tore down many walls demarcating cultures, religions, ethnicities. Frontiers once firmly separating empires, ethnic groups, religions, friends and even the sexes have been intensely crossed in late antiquity – a phenomenon comparable only to the recent transition from modernity to post-modernity — a comparison that we intend to exploit in our methodology.

The “Bright Frontier” summer course explores the dynamic transformation of classical frontiers between the second and the sixth century from a multidisciplinary perspective: archaeology, medieval studies, social and cultural history, art, theology, and literature. Offering a groundbreaking approach to the field of border studies including social, gender, ethnic and religious categories with the participation of outstanding scholars in the field, this course will provide students with a solid knowledge of up-to-date international scholarship on frontiers: a strong theoretical background as well as hands-on acquaintance with physical borders and material artefacts excavated along the Danube River (the ripa Pannonica) as well as in the late antique cemetery of Pécs in Hungary.

For more information, see: http://www.summer.ceu.hu/limes-2014