Workshop: 16th Annual Marco Manuscript Workshop, 5-6 February, 2021

The Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, invites you to join their annual manuscript workshop. The 2021 workshop will take place online via Zoom.

This year’s workshop will consider some of the recent challenges that researchers have faced with the suspension of travel, the closing of libraries and universities, and the quarantine restrictions that have kept so many of us in our homes. How can our field, which has always emphasized the importance of physical place and tactile artifacts, work successfully in isolation and at a distance? What does it mean for us when our work takes place in an incorporeal world of light and numbers rather than ink and flesh, in matrices of data rather than dusty rooms? We will explore the advantages and disadvantages of this “immaterial culture,” and think about how our work is shaped by access or lack of access to manuscripts, texts, catalogues, and objects. 

In addition to the two-day schedule of talks, participants will also have the option to attend a bonus digital mapping event. Participants will use the time outside of the regularly scheduled workshop program to map locales named in three manuscript versions of a 15th century Italian geographic treatise, Goro Dati’s La Sfera. 

To register, please visit the Marco Institute’s website. Registration is required.

The Marco Institute is an internationally acclaimed center for the study of the history and culture of the period from roughly 300 to 1700 C.E. With our rich schedule of lectures, workshops, and symposia; multiple fellowship opportunities for faculty and graduate students; graduate certificate and Summer Latin Program; and undergraduate major and minor, we pursue the research and teaching of the early periods at the highest levels.

Image: BL Harley MS 647 f. 13v

Published by ameliahyde

Amelia Roché Hyde holds an MA from The Courtauld Institute of Art, where she studied cross-cultural artistic traditions of medieval Spain, taking an in-depth look at the context and role of Spanish ivories within sacred spaces. Her favorite medieval art objects are ones that are meant to be handled and touched, and she has researched ivories, textiles, and illuminated manuscripts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The British Museum. Amelia is the Research Assistant at The Met Cloisters.

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