Tag Archives: Medieval Graduate Student Symposium

CFP: Ritual, Performance, and the Senses (AVISTA Medieval Graduate Student Symposium, March 23-24, 2017)

Call for Papers: Ritual, Performance, and the Senses
AVISTA Medieval Graduate Student Symposium
University of North Texas
March 23-24, 2017

Deadline: 1 February 2017

The proliferation of images painted onto monumental structures, the illuminations of manuscripts, the intricacies of ivory carvings and the construction of architectural sculpture in the Medieval Period evince a highly visual culture. As such, medieval scholars have focused heavily on visual reception theory to ascertain the role of the visual within the fabric of medieval society.  Key to many studies is the pivotal role of rituals within the society, particularly in terms of how the medieval person would have absorbed their culture, namely the other senses. As performances would have involved not only the visual, but also the tactile, the aural, gustatory and olfactory, the combination of the sensory experience created a transitory environment within – or outside – the architectural structures that delineated the medieval world.

Ritual and the beginning of performative drama not only created a sensory experience but served to support pre-conceived societal distinctions. From the most exclusive performance, the mass, to the most public ritual, the intercity procession, rituals both enforced and challenged the social barriers of the time. As such, the development of rituals have a history all their own, from the most mundane acts of lay piety shown through blessings, to dramas focused on the lives of the saints and the life of Christ, to the most important feast days, and to the imperial rituals associated with the temporal sphere. Rituals were not confined only to the monastic or ecclesiastical environments, but permeated all segments of society.

The 2017 AVISTA Medieval Graduate Student Symposium at the University of North Texas invites papers from all disciplines and all medieval eras on any topic, but preferences those that address topics of ritual, performance, or sensual experience. Such topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The interconnected use of the senses
  • Ritual history
  • The notion of Medieval Performance Art
  • Lay ritual/noble ritual
  • Manuscript as a performance
  • Sensual props, cues, and rubrications
  • Societal divisions created by rituals
  • Architecture as stage and backdrop
  • Processional routes/pilgrimages
  • Music and sensual stimulation
  • The archaeology of the senses
  • Landscape and topography of performance
  • The language of the senses
  • Sensual cosmology
  • Sensual deprecations

Send papers to: Dr. Mickey Abel (mickey.abel@unt.edu)

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Call for Participation: Medieval Graduate Student Symposium, University of North Texas

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8th Annual Medieval Graduate Student Symposium, University of North Texas, October 2, 2014

“Interdiciplinarity in the era of ‘Relevance:’ Graduate Research across the Disciplines and Beyond.”

Details can be found on the UNT symposium website:

http://art.unt.edu/medieval-symposium/

http://art.unt.edu/medieval-symposium/cfp.php?year=2014

This year the symposium will be held in conjunction with the annual conference of the Texas Medieval Association, October 3-4, 2014. All symposium participants are invited to attend TEMA’s meeting free of charge.

Keynote speakers:
Dr. Barbara Rosenwein, Loyola University, Chicago: “Jean Gerson’s Interdisciplinary Theory of Emotions”

While we will entertain papers on any topic, from any discipline of Medieval Studies—Art History, Religion, Philosophy, English, History, Foreign Languages, Music, we particularly welcome those that engage the multifaceted topic of “Interdisciplinarity in the Age of Relevance.” We encourage submission of papers that have been submitted and/or delivered elsewhere.

Many of us in the academy, even those amongst us who are preparing for a career in the academy, are confronted with the constant refrain of “relevance.” The state of the academy and its public rhetoric profess among its highest goals an emphasis on community engagement, tangible solutions to “real” world problems, and quantifiable results that produce change and progress.  Highlighting the value of stem research, and stressing the potential for expansive pools of external funding, we in the Humanities are asked to consider the creative potential and lucrative benefits of interdisciplinary research clusters and cross-campus collaborative partnerships.   The underlying suggestion in this none-to-subtle rhetoric is, of course,  that the humanities in general, and Medieval Studies in particular,  are less-relevant in our current era because we do not on the surface contribute to this over-arching public mission.

Beginning however, with the understanding that all the various disciplines comprising Medieval Studies—English, History, Music/Liturgy, Philosophy/Religion, Archaeology, Art History, Language Studies—are inherently interdisciplinary and in some sense inseparable, we seek papers that explore or exploit  the difference between “Interdisciplinary,” “Intra-disciplinary,” Extra-disciplinary,” and even “Super-disciplinary” studies.  We are interested in examples of those who are engaging technology in their studies and/or have incorporated a theoretical stance in line with the hard sciences, or perhaps seek to turn the notion of “Relevance” on its head.  We ask: What role do Medievalists play in this new age?  Where do we see ourselves and our projects in the world of “real solutions?”

Travel subvention of $300 will be awarded to the best paper.

Deadline for submission of a 300 word abstract is June 1, 2014. Selected full papers will be due September 15th, 2014.

Paper Abstracts of 300 words should be sent to:  Mickey.Abel@unt.edu