CFP: ‘Cave Architecture and Art in the Middle Ages’ at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020 

Medieval Wall Painting

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020 

Cave churches, monasteries and dwellings can be admired throughout the Mediterranean, where they often appear next to and even intertwined with the built environment. And yet, with the exception of southern Italy and Cappadocia, they are rarely included in studies of the art and architecture in the Mediterranean (broadly understood). This session seeks to explore the role of cave architecture and art in the urban topography of Eurasia and Africa. 

With the exception of Ethiopia and Cappadocia, caves structures are often dismissed because of their small size and simplicity. However, caves and other underground spaces played essential roles in medieval cultures, as demonstrated by their mural decorations and how they appear in hagiographies, pilgrimage accounts and other genres of literature. We are looking for multi-disciplinary papers that argue for the integration of cave architectures within our understanding of the broader Mediterranean during the medieval period. Papers from all disciplines are encouraged. 

Please send paper proposals of 300 words to the session organsier, Maria Harvey (mariajlharvey@gmail.com), by 15 September 2019, together with a short C.V. and a completed Participant Information form. 

Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract. 

All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations. 

Published by Roisin Astell

Roisin Astell received a First Class Honours in History of Art at the University of York (2014), under the supervision of Dr Emanuele Lugli. After spending a year learning French in Paris, Roisin then completed an MSt. in Medieval Studies at the University of Oxford (2016), where she was supervised by Professor Gervase Rosser and Professor Martin Kauffmann. In 2017, Roisin was awarded a CHASE AHRC studentship as a doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, under the supervision of Dr Emily Guerry.

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