Conference: FLAWS Medieval Research Conference, UCL

logo[1]The London Medieval Graduate Network is pleased to announce that its annual conference will take place at UCL on 29th May 2014 with the theme of ‘Flaws.’ This inter-disciplinary conference examines how deliberate or mistaken defects, errors, limitations and imperfections have been perceived across the medieval period.

Flaws are something all researchers have to deal with; from flaws in our source material, to flaws in the approaches and theories we use. The late twentieth century witnessed a concerted effort from within the medieval discipline to challenge not only our theoretical approaches but also the validity of our disciplines themselves. These challenges encouraged researchers to be aware of the limitations of their evidence as well as mindful of the choices they make within their own research. As postgraduates and young researchers we are more aware than ever of the flaws which we face. We hope that this theme will give scope for the discussion of newer areas of medieval study, such as considerations of materiality, the built environment and psychological analyses, whilst also allow us to consider new approaches to more traditional discussions of the text, narratives and institutions.

Professor John Arnold (Birbeck) will give a keynote talk entitled, ‘Flaws in Medieval Belief.’

All welcome. Please email londonmedgradnetwork@gmail.com with any enquiries.

Tickets (free!):

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/flaws-conference-tickets-11408159111


Programme:
(
Roberts Building Room 110, UCL)

9.30 – 10:00 Registration and tea

10:00 11:00 Keynote Address
Flaws in Medieval Belief – Professor John Arnold (Birkbeck, University of London)

11.15-11.30 TeaBreak

11.30-1:00 Manuscripts

Chaired by Sheri Chriqui (RHUL)

‘Exquisite Incongruities’: A Historiography of Medieval Marginalia’

Katherine Sedovic (University of Oxford)

Drypoint Corrections in an Old English Manuscript

Christine Wallis (University of Sheffield)

The Restrictions of National Boundaries: Flaws of Early Medieval Historiography and a Comparative Solution

Anthony Mansfield (University of Keele)

1:00 – 2.30 Lunch break

2.30-3.30 Source Analysis

Chaired by Rebecca Hardie (KCL)

Hildegard of Bingen’s epistolary correspondence and the problems of authenticity. Reflections on a flawed approach and proposals towards a new one

Dijana Bugarin (University of Bern)

The Context and Historical Value of the “Sleat History”

Mary MacTavish Crawford (University of Edinburgh)

2.30-3.30 Source Analysis

Chaired by Rebecca Hardie (KCL)

Hildegard of Bingen’s epistolary correspondence and the problems of authenticity. Reflections on a flawed approach and proposals towards a new one

Dijana Bugarin (University of Bern)

The Context and Historical Value of the “Sleat History”

Mary MacTavish Crawford (University of Edinburgh

3.30-3.45 Tea Break

3.45-5:00 Flawed Analysis

Chaired by Louisa Taylor (UCL)

Amiens and Visual Neuropsychology: Questioning Flaws in Gothic Cathedral Architecture

Mathew Jacobs (University of Oxford)

Mixing up lemons with melons: Errors and Confusions in the Depiction of Plants in Aldobrandino of Siena’s Le Régime du corps

Luis Ribeiro (Nova University of Lisbon)

Bums on seats: Between material and documentary evidence in the study of parish church sedilia

James Alexander Cameron (Courtauld Institute)

5:00 5:15 End Notes
5:15
7:00 Drinks Reception
All welcome!

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