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CRSBI – Annual lecture – Tuesday 25th April 2017 – 5.30pm

Ouroboros, single and in pairs at Kilpeck, England
Ouroboros, single and in pairs at Kilpeck, England
North and South of the Loire: The Culture of Copying and the Rebirth of Sculpture
by Professor Deborah Kahn
Tuesday 25th April 2017 at 5.30pm at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.
 
Abstract
 
From his thesis of 1950 on “Regional Schools of English Sculpture” to his later writings, Professor George Zarnecki, deputy director of the Courtauld Institute of Art from 1961 – 74, showed himself to be a master of visual comparison.  In one of his last articles (written in 1992), he surveyed the iconographic kinship between the earliest Romanesque sculptures at Saint-Benoit-sur-Loîre, Bayeux and Toulouse.  These far-flung similarities revealed a culture of copying that led to what may be regarded as a rebirth of architectural sculpture in these regions.  The article still serves as the basis for further exploration of the visual relationships between the earliest monumental architectural sculpture and the role of copybooks and loose sketches in the transmission of motifs and iconography.   George speculated that the likely source of all these relationships was the monastery and library at Saint-Benoit-sur-Loîre — as indeed has turned out to be the case.   Moreover, the emergent taste for monumental architectural sculpture on the great new ashlar buildings of the first half of the 11th century appears to reflect not only the preoccupations of the abbot of Saint-Benoit, Gauzlin (1004-1030), but also those of his half brother Robert II (972-1031), whose foundations at Saint-Germain-des-Prés and Saint-Aignan at Orléans were richly carved in the 1020s as well.   The rebirth of monumental architectural sculpture in the early eleventh century thus turns out to have been given impetus by the ascendant Capetian dynasty.  These connections amplify the links set forth by George and confirm not only his extraordinary ability to trace previously unnoticed formal lineages but also his role in laying the ground for future studies in the field of Romanesque art.
Invitation is attached.  Seating is unreserved and booking is not necessary but please RSVP to this e-mail address: crsbiconnect@gmail.com
crsbi lecture inv-DK2017
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Murray Seminars on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck, Spring Term 2017

0067_allegory_of_justice_-_injustice-144a8d98631489020fe18th Jan Zsofia Buda ‘The Lady with the book and the closed curtain: iconographical peculiarities in a 15th-century Jewish service book for Passover’ discusses some unusual illustrations in a South German Jewish service book for Passover, finding among other things some surprising similarities with Christian iconography

22 Feb Laura Jacobus ‘”Mea culpa?” Penitence, Enrico Scrovegni and me’ The Arena Chapel in Padua was until very recently thought to be commissioned as an act of restitution for usury, and its frescoes by Giotto as an expression of penitence on the part of the patron Enrico Scrovegni. That view has now been challenged by Laura Jacobus and others. But two of her recent discoveries have the potential to reinforce the established view and undermine her own. What happens when a researcher uncovers inconvenient truths, and what is to be done?

15th March Péter Bokody ‘The Politicization of Rape: Giotto’s Allegory of Injustice in Padua’ suggests that the allegory of Injustice in the Arena Chapel (Padua) by Giotto and the allegory of War in the Palazzo Pubblico (Siena) by Ambrogio Lorenzetti are key allegorical images of rape which can offer critical and politicized representations of sexual violence without sanitizing or eroticizing the act. Their unparalleled representations of sexual violence have implications for a general history of rape and the visual culture of late-medieval Italy.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm. Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments. We hope to see you there.

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Lecture series Upcoming Events

Christie’s Education Antiquity to Renaissance Evening Lecture Series

‘Heaven and Hell ‘by the Master of Avicenna, c. 1432, now in Pinacoteca Nazionale Bologna
‘Heaven and Hell ‘by the Master of Avicenna, c. 1432, now in Pinacoteca Nazionale Bologna

Christie’s Education is delighted to announce the first of our Antiquity to Renaissance Evening Lecture series. This lecture programme is arranged to support the study and understanding of arts from Antiquity to the Middle Ages and Renaissance. It is organised by the Art and Collecting: Antiquity to Renaissance department.

Dr Niamh Bhalla will present “Mapping Otherworldly Spaces in the Late Medieval World.” She was Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art. Her research focuses on using contemporary theory to open up fresh insights into how classical, byzantine and medieval images were experienced. Dr Bhalla has also been the project coordinator for the Getty-supported research project, Crossing Frontiers: Christians and Muslims and their art in Eastern Anatolia and the Caucasus at the Courtauld Institute.

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception.

Thursday 23 February 2017 at 6.00 pm

Christie’s Education
153 Great Titchfield Street, London, W1W 5BD
020 7665 4350 | london@christies.edu
Click here to register for this free event.

Future Antiquity to Renaissance Evening Lectures

Thursday 27 April 2017
Dr Caspar Meyer, Birkbeck, University of London, (Title to be confirmed)

Thursday 25 May 2017
Dr Jessica Barker, University of East Anglia, ‘Voices and Ventriloquism in Medieval Tomb Sculpture’,

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Lecture: ‘Lost in Transformation: Early Medieval Sculpture and National Narratives in Croatia’ (29th Nov 2016)

68314_407623029309611_840244416_nDr Magdalena Skoblar (British School at Rome) presenting on:

Lost in Transformation: Early Medieval Sculpture and National Narratives in Croatia’

The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting a lecture on Tuesday evening, November 29th, at 7.00pm in the Wolfson Room (NB01), IHR Basement, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU)

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend the lecture.

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Lecture: ‘Guthlac on a Roll’: British Library, MS Harley Y.6 (20th October 2016)

guthlacYou are warmly invited to attend the inaugural lecture for the Digital Editing and the Medieval Manuscript Roll workshops in collaboration between UCL and Yale. More information about the series can be found here: https://digitalrollsandfragments.com/

 The lecture will be by Jane Roberts of the School of Advanced Studies and Institute of English Studies, entitled “‘Guthlac on a Roll’: British Library, MS Harley Y.6”

 The lecture will be in theUniversity College London Institute of Education (20 Bedford Way) Room 901 at 6pm, with a reception afterwards.

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Lecture, Prof Liz James: ‘Light and colour; dark and shadow’, 5.30pm,Tues 11th October, Courtauld Institute, London

church-of-the-theotokos-pammakaristos
Church of the Theotokos Pammakaristos (Liz James)

Prof Liz James (University of Sussex): ‘Light and colour; dark and shadow’

Light and colour, darkness and shadow, are all fundamental aspects of works of art in a practical way (can we see the work?), a formal fashion (what colours are used?) and conceptually (why these colours? Why this light or this lighting?). But they are also elements of the work of art that have tended to have a secondary place within the history of art. Through a discussion of Byzantine monumental mosaics, this lecture will consider some of the ways in which light, dark, colour and shade are fundamental elements in the appearance, effectiveness and function of images. 

Liz James is Professor of Art History at the University of Sussex and a Byzantinist. She has been interested in light and colour for a long time, writing her doctoral thesis on colour in Byzantium. She has just finished writing a book about medieval mosaics (provisionally entitled ‘A short history of medieval mosaics’).

Ticket / entry details:

Tuesday 11 October 2016
5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

This lecture launches the Frank Davis Memorial Series on Light/Darkness

Open to all, free admission

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

logo
Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

Fortnightly Thursdays 17:30, IHR Wolfson II unless noted; free, all welcome

Winter Term
29th September ** Senate House South Block Room 349 (3rd Floor)**
Chris Wickham (Oxford): Jiangnan style: Doing global economic history in the medieval period

13th October
Giorgio Lizzul (KCL): The republic, commerce, and public debt in the forged orations of Doge Tommaso Mocenigo

Kenneth Duggan (KCL): The limits of strong government: Attempts to control criminality in thirteenth-century England

27th October (jointly with History of Liturgy seminar)
Cecilia Gaposchkin (Dartmouth & UCL): Liturgy and devotion in the aftermath of the FourthCrusade: Nivelon of Soissons, the relics of 1204, and the cathedral of Soissons

10th November
Andrew Jotischky (Royal Holloway): The image of the Greek: Western views of orthodox monks and monasteries, c.1000-1500

24th November
Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg): Military expatriation to Muslim lands: Aragonese Christian mercenaries as trans-imperial subjects in the Late Middle Ages

8th December (** Senate House Room 246 **)
Justine Firnhaber-Baker (St Andrews): Who were the Jacques and what did they want? Social networks and community mobilization in the Jacquerie of 1358

Spring Term 2017

18th January (jointly with Earlier Middle Ages Seminar, **time & venue to be confirmed**)
Roundtable discussion of Cathars in Question ed. Antonio Sennis (Boydell & Brewer, 2016)

19th January (** Senate House, The Court Room**)
Sylvain Piron (EHESS): An individual institutionalization: Opicino de Canestris (1296– c.1354)

2nd February
Nicholas Vincent (UEA): Henry II’s Irish colony: Truth and fiction

16th February
Dominique Iogna-Prat (CNRS/EHESS): A stone church? Visibility, monumentality and spatiality of the Medieval Church (500-1500)

2nd March
Ella Kilgallon (QMUL): Visualising castitas in the Franciscan tradition: An analysis of three frescoes from central Italy

Ella Williams (UCL): History and prophecy in Naples: The Faits des Romains at the court of KingRobert ‘the Wise’

16th March
Jonathan Lyon (Chicago): Offices, officials and bureaucracy in late medieval Europe: The view from Germany

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL); IHR page http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/114.

Contact: John Sabapathy & Alice Taylor (j.sabapathy@ucl.ac.uk & alice.taylor@kcl.ac.uk).

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BAA Lectures: 2016-2017 Programme

logomaneyBAA Lectures, 2016-2017 Programme : Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE, 4.30 p.m. (tea)/5.00 p.m (lecture)

5 OCTOBER 2016* – ‘Miraculous Ground Plans and the Liturgy of Building Sites in Late Medieval Italy’ by Dr Lucy Donkin, University of Bristol (The lecture will be preceded by the Association’s Annual General Meeting.)

2 NOVEMBER 2016 – ‘Architecture and Landscape at Restormel Castle, Cornwall’ by Dr Jeremy Ashbee, English Heritage

7 DECEMBER 2016* – ‘Monuments in Wax: Form and Function in Medieval Charters’ by Dr Jessica Barenbeim, Magdalen College, Oxford

4 JANUARY 2017 – ‘The Great English Medieval Bridges: Designs and Functions.’ by Dr David Harrison, International Bridges Group (The lecture will be followed by the Association’s Twelfth-Night Party)

1 FEBRUARY 2017* – ‘When is a Cathedral not a Cathedral? Typologies of Secular and Monastic in the English Great Church.’ by Jon Cannon, University of Bristol

1 MARCH 2017, ‘The Medieval Glazing of Westminster Abbey: New Discoveries’ by Professor Richard Marks and Laura Atkinson, University of Cambridge and Canterbury Cathedral Stained Glass Studio

5 APRIL 2017 – “See God Face to Face; Pray for the King’: The Late Medieval Painted Glass of Winchester Cathedral c1495-c1515’ by Anya Heilpern, University of York

3 MAY 2017* – ‘The Late Medieval Master Mason as Manager; a New Assessment based on a Systematic Analysis of the English Cathedral Fabric Rolls’ by Christopher Paterson, University of Oxford (The lecture will be followed by the President’s Reception)

NB: Council meetings will precede the meetings on dates marked with an asterisk (*).
Non-members are welcome to attend occasional lectures, please sign the visitors’ book on arrival.

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Seminar: Laura Slater ‘Talking Back to Power? Art and Political Opinion in Early Fourteenth-Century England’ 29 June 2016

Murray Lecture ImageThe Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art

‘Spin’ and reputation management were an established part of medieval politics. Laura Slater explores the role of art and architecture in challenging political ideas and opinions in early fourteenth-century England, focussing on the activities of Queen Isabella of France during the 1320s. Successful in invading England, deposing her husband Edward II and establishing herself asde facto regent in place of her teenaged son, Edward III, Isabella managed to use art and architecture to present herself as a loving, loyal and virtuous wife. Yet the queen’s subjects may still have ‘talked back to her’ responding to these PR efforts in a similarly public and permanent setting.

29th June 2016

All seminars are held at 5pm in the Keynes Library at Birkbeck’s School of Arts (Room 114, 43, Gordon Sq., London, WC1H OPD). A break at 5.50pm is followed by discussion and refreshments

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Reuter Lecture: ‘Warfare, Christianity and the ‘Peace of God’: Non-Combatant Immunity in Medieval Reality and Theory’, Tuesday 7 June 2016

Medieval warfareThe Reuter Lecture this year will be given by Professor John Gillingham, FBA, Emeritus Professor of Medieval History at the London School of Economics.

‘Warfare, Christianity and the ‘Peace of God’: Non-Combatant Immunity in Medieval Reality and Theory’

Tuesday 7 June 2016 at 6pm

For many historians of war and society it remains an article of faith that the medieval Christian church attempted to mitigate the horrors of war. The “Peace Movement” of the tenth and eleventh centuries is thought to have made a significant contribution to the early development of laws of war in the West on the grounds that it aimed at protecting not only ecclesiastical persons and property but also non-combatants in general, above all women and children. In this lecture I question and qualify this orthodoxy, in part by analysis of the provisions of early church councils, in part by considering the discontinuance in practice of ancient and early medieval ‘total war’..

This lecture will be chaired by Professor Peter Clarke, Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Director of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture.

The speaker is an eminent scholar of the political history of the Central Middle Ages, especially the Angevin Empire, and his many distinguished publications include a biography of Richard I (the Lionheart) in the Yale English Monarchs Series, published in 1999. He shared with Timothy Reuter, Professor of Medieval History at the University of Southampton (1994-2002), not only an interest in European politics of the Central Middle Ages but also a personal and professional friendship which makes him a highly suitable speaker to give a lecture in Reuter’s memory. The lecture will be introduced by another close friend and colleague of Timothy Reuter’s and a previous Reuter Lecturer, Dame Jinty Nelson, FBA, Emeritus Professor of Medieval History, King’s College London.

Event Information

Venue
Avenue Campus
University of Southampton
SO17 1BF

RSVP by 31 May
This event is free however you must register to attend and receive joining instructions. There will be refreshments served before the lecture and a drink reception to follow the lecture.  To register for a place please emailtps@southampton.ac.uk

If you have any further questions or queries about this event please contact Tracy Storey ontps@southampton.ac.uk