Category Archives: Lecture series

Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series: Images, devotion and emotion in 13th- and 14th-century Castile (18 April 2018)

toro-santa-clara-600x600What was the role of images in the religious experience of Castilian people of the 13th and 14th centuries? There is no clear answer, and the scarcity of written evidence has prompted much problematic speculation. However, on the basis of the images themselves and of relevant literary sources, including the well-known Cantigas de Santa María and works by 14th-century authors such as Juan Ruiz and Juan Manuel, it is possible to explore a number of key issues. The talk will be divided into three sections. One focuses on the 13th century: ‘Active images: the Cantigas de Santa María and their aftermath’. Another looks to the 14th century: ‘Passive images: the reception and dissemination of the Crucifixus dolorosus in Castile’. And it concludes by looking ‘beyond’ Art History. In the 1960s a Spanish politician coined the (in)famous tourist slog, ‘Spain is different’. His aim was to encourage foreigners to visit Spain, but the slogan is representative of a commonplace that has been repeated time and again since the Romantic era. Ultimately, my talk offers an invitation to reconsider whether Castilian and Spanish devotional practices are really so very different from those recorded elsewhere in medieval western Europe. Continue reading

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Lecture: “Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross, Institute for Historical Research, 27/02/2018

Easby Cross

NOW CANCELLED DUE TO INDUSTRIAL ACTION!

 

The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting the following lecture on Tuesday 27th February at 7pm:

Meg Boulton, speaking on ‘”Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross.

Location: Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room NB01, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!

Upcoming Lectures at the British Archaeological Association 07/03/2018, 04/04/2018, 02/05/2018

BAA

The British Archaeological Association is delighted to announce our upcoming lectures:

7 March – ‘Awake thou that sleepest: The Resurrection of Mary Magdalene in Central Europe’ by Dr Zoe Opacic
4 April – ‘Bridgwater Friary: A provincial town and the Franciscan friars in late medieval Somerset’ by Dr Hannah Wesyt
2 May – ‘ Inventing Vaults in the Twelfth Century: Salamanca, Al-Andalus and France’ by Dr Tom Nickson

All lectures take place at the Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House (Piccadilly) at 5.00 pm. Tea is available from 4.30 pm.

Further information about the BAA, the lectures and past events can be found on our website https://thebaa.org/

Lecture Emmanuele Lugli “Chasing Absence: The Body of Christ and the Measures to Enter in Touch with it” 17:00 13/02/2018 Birkbeck

Mensura Christi Talk
This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the ‘mensura Christi,’ or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its marginalization in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the ‘mensura Christi’ relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationships of measuring practices, visual belief, and religious orders, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.
 
All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

Lecture: Un trésor de l’Arsenal : la Bible de Saint-Jean d’Acre

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6 février 2018 – 18h15-19h30

Galerie Colbert, auditorium
Institut national d’histoire de l’art
2, rue Vivienne ou 6 rue des Petits Champs
75002 Paris

Lorsque Saint Louis s’installe à Saint-Jean d’Acre entre 1250 et 1254, la cité cosmopolite où se côtoient chrétiens, juifs et musulmans, est la ville la plus florissante du Royaume latin de Jérusalem. Mais c’est sans doute sous l’impulsion du roi de France qu’un scriptorium y est fondé et qu’une production de manuscrits richement enluminés y prend naissance. Cette Bible, commanditée, sans doute, par Saint Louis qui l’aurait ensuite rapportée en France, présente une intéressante tentative de traduction de la Bible en langue vernaculaire et un important cycle d’enluminures où se mêlent style français et iconographie byzantine, reflet du creuset de cultures qu’est alors Saint-Jean d’Acre. Ce manuscrit est entré au XVIIIe siècle dans la collection du fondateur de l’Arsenal, le marquis de Paulmy. Continue reading

Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London, 31 Jan-27 Jun 18)

Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB, January 31 – June 27, 2018

Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern

e986ba7faa2ca55eff27486400168447--leather-apron-workshop-designWorkshop and workshop practices represent a core and dynamic research strand in the history of art. This strand encompasses the study of canonical artists but equally of the anonymous producers whose activities can be deduced from the surviving art objects, thanks to ever developing research questions and methodologies. This topic helps us to think about the agents and their networks (artists, patrons and other market consumers), objects and socio-economic factors (making, buying and trading) as well as the broader cultural issues of the transmission of skills and ideas (the movement of artists, objects and imagery). Our lecture series brings together leading experts in medieval and early modern historical periods in and beyond Europe, particular highpoints for the study of workshop practices, and also those researching workshop continuities and changes in later centuries, including digital mediation.

Continue reading

Lecture: Felipe Pereda, ‘Images’ Oblivious Memory: Funerary Laments from Ancient Greece to El Greco’. Courtauld Institute of Art, London, 4pm, Thursday 25th January, 2018

Pereda

Felipe Pereda (Harvard), will give the inaugural lecture for the 2018-19 Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series at 4pm on Thursday 25th January in the Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre of the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

An old narrative tradition going back to Ancient Egypt but documented across the Mediterranean – from the Middle East to Greece — shows women attending funerals performing theatrical, but also highly ritualized gestures that express unbearable pain. This visual trope corresponds to a practice that was surveyed and prosecuted in this part of the world well before the arrival of Christianity. The practice continued in Iberia throughout the Middle Ages, producing from the 12th century onwards an extraordinary tradition of painting and monumental sculpture. This lecture will explore the persistence, survival and repression of this practice and discuss the contribution of the visual arts to the production of cultural memory.

 

Felipe Pereda is Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art at Harvard University. Born in Madrid, he studied at the Universidad Complutense, and the Autónoma University where he received his PhD (1995) and taught until 2011. In more recent years, he has also taught at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas (Universidad Autónoma de México), and Johns Hopkins University (2011-15). He has worked on Spanish late medieval and early modern art, art theory, image theory and history of architecture.

His books include, La arquitectura elocuente (1999), El atlas del Rey Planeta (3rd. ed. 2003), and Images of Discord. Poetics and Politics of the Sacred Image in 15th century Spain (Spanish ed. 2007; English translation, Harvey Miller, forthcoming). He has recently published on artists such as Luis de Morales, Ribera, or Zurbarán.