Call for Journal Submissions: Postmedieval, Special Issue Proposals (published 2022 & 2023), deadline 15 May 2021

Postmedieval publishes theoretically driven scholarship on premodernity and its ongoing reverberations. Contributions are characterised by conceptual adventure, stylistic experiment, political urgency, or surprising encounter. The editors are committed to expanding the fields of knowledge and geography represented in the journal, by showcasing scholarship that reaches across disciplines, language traditions, locales, modes of inquiry, and levelsContinue reading “Call for Journal Submissions: Postmedieval, Special Issue Proposals (published 2022 & 2023), deadline 15 May 2021”

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Post-Doctoral Fellowship: ‘Demarginalizing Medieval Africa: Images, Texts, and Identity in Early Solomonic Ethiopia (1270-1527)’, University of Hamburg, deadline 15 April 2021

The applicant shall conduct research on the manuscript and literary culture of Ethiopia in the frame of the project “Demarginalizing medieval Africa: Images, texts, and identity in early Solomonic Ethiopia (1270-1527)”. The project intends to shed new light on the art, history, and culture of the Ethiopian Empire during a period going from the riseContinue reading “Post-Doctoral Fellowship: ‘Demarginalizing Medieval Africa: Images, Texts, and Identity in Early Solomonic Ethiopia (1270-1527)’, University of Hamburg, deadline 15 April 2021”

Online Conference: Clarendon Palace Conference 2021, 10-11 April 2021

A two-day free Zoom conference to celebrate recent excavations at the medieval palace of Clarendon, Wiltshire. Dubbed ‘the most important medieval secular building in Wiltshire’, the medieval royal palace of Clarendon is a unique time capsule, occupied from the Norman Conquest but abandoned by 1500. This conference will showcase some results of the first truly archaeologicalContinue reading “Online Conference: Clarendon Palace Conference 2021, 10-11 April 2021”

New Publication: Medieval Ethiopian Kingship, Craft, and Diplomacy with Latin Europe, by Verena Krebs

This book explores why Ethiopian kings pursued long-distance diplomatic contacts with Latin Europe in the late Middle Ages. It traces the history of more than a dozen embassies dispatched to the Latin West by the kings of Solomonic Ethiopia, a powerful Christian kingdom in the medieval Horn of Africa. Drawing on sources from Europe, Ethiopia,Continue reading “New Publication: Medieval Ethiopian Kingship, Craft, and Diplomacy with Latin Europe, by Verena Krebs”

PhD Studentship: The Early Medieval Northwest Atlantic Region (Medieval Ireland, Wales, Anglo-Saxon England, or Iceland), University College Dublin, deadline 30 April 2021

The College of Arts and Humanities, University College Dublin, Ireland, is pleased to announce a generously funded Ph.D. studentship specialising in: The early medieval northwest Atlantic region (medieval Ireland, Wales, Anglo-Saxon England, or Iceland) which will be supervised by Dr Lindy Brady, Assistant Professor in Early Medieval Insular History and recently appointed Ad Astra Fellow at the SchoolContinue reading “PhD Studentship: The Early Medieval Northwest Atlantic Region (Medieval Ireland, Wales, Anglo-Saxon England, or Iceland), University College Dublin, deadline 30 April 2021”

Online Lecture: ‘“Who Was Richer In Glittering Wealth Than Solomon?”: Carolingian Values’ with Aden Kumler, 2021 Martindale Lecture, 13 May 2021, 17.00 BST

In the eighth and ninth centuries, Carolingian rulers, intellectuals, and artists pursued a major experiment in worldly and spiritual economics. This lecture examines how a series of Carolingian works of art and artifacts crafted—often quite polemically—a vision of the economy of salvation, defined by the commensuration of aesthetic, material, and sacred value. Aden Kumler is Professor in the DepartmentContinue reading “Online Lecture: ‘“Who Was Richer In Glittering Wealth Than Solomon?”: Carolingian Values’ with Aden Kumler, 2021 Martindale Lecture, 13 May 2021, 17.00 BST”

Call for Journal Submissions: I Quaderni del Mediae Aetatis Sodalicium (M.Ae.S), vol. 19 (2021), deadline 30 July 2021

The journal I Quaderni del Mediae Aetatis Sodalicium (M.Ae.S) is opening a call for scientific contributions in view of the publication of its 19th issue, scheduled for 30 November 2021. The journal, founded in 1998, is hosted by the AlmaDL Journals service, the digital publication system for peer-reviewed journals of the University of Bologna. ItContinue reading “Call for Journal Submissions: I Quaderni del Mediae Aetatis Sodalicium (M.Ae.S), vol. 19 (2021), deadline 30 July 2021”

CFP: ‘Shades of Purple: Purple Ornament in Medieval Manuscripts’, University of Zurich (25-26 November 2021), deadline 30 April 2021

“Textures of Sacred Scripture. Materials and Semantics of Sacred Book Ornament in the Western Middle Ages, 780-1300 (https://textures-of-scripture.ch)” is a research project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation at the Chair of Medieval Art History at the University of Zurich. We invite paper proposals for a two-day workshop on purple ornament in medieval manuscripts,Continue reading “CFP: ‘Shades of Purple: Purple Ornament in Medieval Manuscripts’, University of Zurich (25-26 November 2021), deadline 30 April 2021”

Call for Journal Submissions: ‘(re)Interpreted, (re)Imagined, (re)Constructed: Medieval art and Medievalisms in Central Europe after 1945’, Ikonotheka vol. 31, deadline 30 April 2021

In Central Europe, the year of 1945 brought about not only new borders but also a new socio-political system, accelerated modernisation, and the promise of a “brave new world” which was to be founded on the ruins of the past. However, the ideological drive towards the future was supplemented by a turn towards a specificallyContinue reading “Call for Journal Submissions: ‘(re)Interpreted, (re)Imagined, (re)Constructed: Medieval art and Medievalisms in Central Europe after 1945’, Ikonotheka vol. 31, deadline 30 April 2021”

New Publication: New Horizons in Trecento Italian Art, edited by Bryan C. Keene and Karl Whittington

The fourteenth century in Italy, the age of Giotto, Dante, and Boccaccio, widely known as the trecento, was a pivotal moment in art history and in European culture. The studies in this volume present new approaches to art in this important but often neglected period of the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Scholars atContinue reading “New Publication: New Horizons in Trecento Italian Art, edited by Bryan C. Keene and Karl Whittington”