Call for Entries: ‘Encyclopedia of Medieval Royal Iconography’ (Deadline 31st December 2021)

Editor: Dr. Mirko Vagnoni
Publisher: MDPI (Basel)

The Encyclopedia of Medieval Royal Iconography sets out to do the first extensive collection of information on royal iconography covering the whole Middle Ages (476–1492). In particular, this book would like to collect entries about every medieval kingdom from Portugal to the Caucasus and from Iceland to North Africa following the different dynasties and with a particular emphasis on the most important kings who ruled during this period (please see the planned entries at the following link: https://encyclopedia.pub/book/detail/7). Every entry (more or less 4000 words for the main body text and approximately five pictures) should answer the following questions:


• Did the kings make use of royal images? Was it them, some members of their court, or other subjects that commissioned them?
• Which medium did the kings preferably use for their images (seals, coins, manuscripts, mosaics, frescoes, paintings, and sculptures)?
• In which context did the kings preferably place their images (in religious places as churches or monasteries or in lay places as palace, squares, or city-gates)?
• Which visibility did these images have? Who were they addressed to?
• Which iconographic themes did these images use?
• In which way did the royal images render symbols of power, attire, and the physical appearance of the king? Did they follow specific patterns or create new iconographies?

If you are interested in submitting an entry, please contact the following email address (mirkovagnoni@libero.it) by 31 October 2021 for more details.

Published by charlottecook

Charlotte Cook graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor’s degree in European History from Washington & Lee University in 2019. In 2020 she received her Master’s degree in History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, earning the classification of Merit. Her research explores questions of royal patronage, both by and in honor of rulers, in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England. She has worked as a researcher and collections assistant at several museums and galleries, and plans to begin her PhD in the autumn of 2022.

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