Call for Papers: ‘The Materiality in the Fourteenth Century II: Art and Architecture’, ICMS Kalamazoo, 9-14 May 2022 (Deadline 15 September 2021)

The art and architecture of the fourteenth century reflect the social changes and political upheavals that defined the period in Europe. Scholars have increasingly employed the materiality of art—its physical features and characteristics—to critically investigate expanding trade networks, modes of production, and the relationship between artist, patron, and viewer. This session builds on this momentum to explore the social and cultural function of art and architecture in the fourteenth century. Submissions are invited to examine the materiality of art and architecture from any disciplinary and theoretical perspective; interdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged. Potential papers might comprise, but are not limited to, investigations of the relationship between an object’s material and form; examinations on shifts in artistic production; applications of visual and formal analysis; or considerations of the ritual, political, and economic significance of objects and their materials. This session invites submissions on all forms of art and architecture including from Latin, Byzantine, and Islamic contexts.

This session is the second of three panels sponsored by the 14th Century Society centered on the discussion of materiality during the fourteenth century. Please submit paper proposals by September 15th through the ICMS Confex website (https://icms.confex.com/icms/2022am/cfp.cgi). Please contact Gabriela Chitwood (gchitwoo@uoregon.edu) with any questions and concerns.

Published by charlottecook

Charlotte Cook graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor’s degree in European History from Washington & Lee University in 2019. In 2020 she received her Master’s degree in History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, earning the classification of Merit. Her research explores questions of royal patronage, both by and in honor of rulers, in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England. She has worked as a researcher and collections assistant at several museums and galleries, and plans to begin her PhD in the autumn of 2022.

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