IMC 2021: Medieval Art related papers & panels, 5 – 9 July 2021

We’ve had a look through the programme and have brought together all the Medieval Art related papers and panels. Please let us know if we’ve missed a panel or paper that you think Medieval Art Researchers would like to know about! You can see the full programme here.


Monday 5 July 2021

11.15-12.45 (BST)

Session: 101

Fieldwork and Analysis: Ongoing Work of the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland

Sponsor: Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI)
Organiser: Xavier Dectot, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI), London
Moderator: Ron Baxter, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI), London

Paper 101-a:  An Hour in the Life of a Fieldworker (Language: English), Rita Wood, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI), London

Paper 101-b: New Perspectives on Two Cotswold Doorways (Language: English), John Wand, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI), London

Paper 101-c: The Elephant in the Room: Romanesque Sculpted Elephants in Britain and Their Sources (Language: English), Xavier Dectot


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 201

Urban Architecture and its Development

Moderator: Michael Carter, Curatorial Department, English Heritage, London

Paper 201-a: A Rare Example of Medieval Residential Architecture in Boka Kotorska Bay, Montenegro (Language: English), Katarina Nikolić Krasan, Independent Scholar, Montenegro

Paper 201-b: The Dynamics of the Medieval Town Square: An Archaeological Study of an Open Space (Language: English), Lisa Renn, Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs- Universität Freiburg / Zentrum für Kulturwissenschaftliche Forschung Lübeck (ZKFL)

Paper 201-c: The Dialogue between the Castle and the Monastery within the Medieval Town (Language: English), Monica Ruset Oanca, Facultatea de Limbi și Literaturi Străine, Universitatea din Bucureşti


14.00-17.00 (BST)

Price: £10.00

Discover Cyrillic Calligraphy and Illumination: A Workshop on the Theory and Practice of an Ancient Art

Directed by Edgar Rops and Anastasija Ropa

Cyrillic calligraphy is an ancient art, dating back to the creation of the Cyrillic alphabet in the ninth century. It is also a living tradition, as Cyrillic scripts are widely used today: you can see them on icons, in decorations for devotional literature and fairy tales, and in many other contexts.

This workshop will begin with a presentation about the history of Cyrillic calligraphy and a description of different styles and scripts (the uncial, the half-uncial, and the cursive). Participants will learn about the differences between traditional illumination styles in medieval and early modern manuscripts and will see examples of illuminated manuscripts that can be used as inspirations for their own work. In the practical part, participants will be introduced to the basics of creating simple objects of art, such as cards, name tags, and bookmarks, as well as learning the steps for creating more complex art, such as copying the page of an existing historical manuscript or creating their own manuscript page by combining elements of existing manuscripts.

The first, theoretical part will last for 40 minutes and will be followed by a 20-minute question and answer section. In the second, practical part, the tutors will demonstrate how to shape letters in uncial, from the simplest to the more complex ones. The participants will then be able to practice some simple words and phrases. This part of the workshop will last for an hour, with 40 minutes for the explanation and 20 minutes for individual practice, questions, and discussion. During the last hour, the tutors will outline the principal steps in producing illuminated calligraphic art: laying out the page, writing the text, tracing the design on a separate slip of paper and copying it onto the page, and finally coloring the illumination. The participants can then practice creating a bookmark with the first words from the Gospel of John (‘In the beginning was the word’, which in the Gospel of Miroslav and other lectionaries is preceded by a decorated initial).

Participants in the workshop will need to provide their own materials, including a calligraphy pen (or nib(s), holder, and ink), paper (ruled paper and/or watercolour or other good quality paper), ruler, soft pencil, eraser, paint (watercolour paints or pencils. gouache, or tempura paint).

Edgar and Anastasija study the medieval and early modern documents produced in Livonia, at the crossroads of eastern and western traditions of writing, and the artistic practices that went into the decoration of historical documents, presenting their research at international venues, with peer-reviewed publications to their credit. Edgar is a lawyer and legal historian by education, with a passion for historical calligraphy. He has also organised calligraphy workshops for general audiences, both with and without experience in calligraphy, and calligraphy-based team-building activities. Anastasija’s PhD research involved a study of medieval romance, with a long-standing interest in manuscripts and charters produced and circulated in medieval Livonia.

This workshop can only accommodate a limited number of participants. Early booking is recommended.


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 209

Rituals and Representations of Rulership: On Expressions of Female and Male Power and Authority in 15th-Century Sweden

Sponsor: Malmö universitet

Organiser: Thomas Småberg, Institutionen för samhälle, kultur och identitet, Malmö universitet

Moderator: Kurt Villads Jensen, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet

Paper 209-a: Regency, Power, and Ritual: On the Construction of the Image of the Regent in the Late Middle Ages (Language: English), Thomas Småberg

Paper 209-b: Images of Queenship in 15th-Century Sweden (Language: English), Margaretha Nordquist, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet

Paper 209-c: Queenly Emotions, Rhetoric, and Rituals of Intercession: The Roles of Royal and Aristocratic Women in Times of Rebellion and Civil War (Language: English), Kim Bergqvist, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 217

Byzantine Alchemy Between Art and Science

Sponsor: Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art & Culture

Organiser: Alexandre Roberts, Department of Classics, University of Southern California

Moderator: Charles Burnett, Warburg Institute, University of London

Paper 217-a: Terms, Concepts, and Perceptions of Alchemy in Byzantium (Language: English), Gerasimos Merianos, Institute of Historical Research, National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF), Athens

Paper 217-b: Philosophers, Chemists, and the Sacred Art: The Greco-Arabic Intellectual Context of Byzantine Alchemy (Language: English), Alexandre Roberts

Paper 217-c: Alchemy in Medieval Byzantium: An Artisanal Turn (Language: English), Shannon Steiner, Art History Department, Binghamton University, New York


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 301

Colouring Outside the Lines: New Perspectives on the Borders of Manuscripts

Organiser: Emily Shartrand, Independent Scholar, Philadelphia

Moderator: Christine Bachman, Department of Art History, University of Delaware

Paper 301-a: Networked Borders: A Computational Analysis of Images in the Margins of Gothic Manuscripts (Language: English), Alexander Brey, Art Department, Wellesley College, Massachusetts and Maeve Doyle, Department of Art & Art History, Eastern Connecticut State University

Paper 301-b: Visual Genealogies in Manuscript Borders: Heraldic Decoration as Commemorative Device (Language: English), Jessica Savage, Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University

Paper 301-c: Denigrated Images: ‘Marginalia’ and the mise-en-page (Language: English), Emily Shartrand


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 314

Weather Saints, II: Water in Texts and Images

Organiser: Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia

Moderator: Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky

Paper 314-a: Worlds of Storms, Hail, Floods, and Drought: Weather in 14th- Century Church Slavonic Manuscripts Translated from the Byzantine Metaphrastic Menologion (Language: English), Marijana Vuković, Institut for Historie, Syddansk Universitet

Paper 314-b: The Chants against a Tempest: The Chants as Part of the Prayers for Protection in a Storm Found in Medieval Manuscripts, 14th-15th Centuries (Language: English), Laine Tabora, Pontificium Institutum Musicae Sacrae, Roma

Paper 314-c: The ‘Folding Altarpiece’ as a Means of Praising the Relics and the Miracles of the Patron Saints of the Venetian Republic (Language: English), Pasquale Francesco Antonino Giambo, Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali, Università degli Studi di Padua

Paper 314-d: An Image between Miracle and Climate: The Iconography of Our Lady of the Snows in Italian Illuminated Manuscripts (Language: English), Michela Giuntoli, Independent Scholar, Lucca


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 322

Studies in Manuscripts, I: The Data

Organiser: N. Kıvılcım Yavuz, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, University of Kansas

Moderator: N. Kıvılcım Yavuz

Paper 322-a: Discovering and Digitizing Pre-1600 Manuscripts in the United States: A Progress Report (Language: English), Lisa Fagin Davis, Medieval Academy of America, Massachusetts

Paper 322-b: Distant Cataloguing, or How to Catalogue the Vatican Manuscripts on One Dollar a Day (Language: English), Aaron Macks, Harvard Business School, Harvard University

Paper 322-c: Linked Data (Language: English), Toby Burrows, Oxford e-Research Centre, University of Oxford / School of Humanities, University of Western Australia, Perth


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 323

A Saint Beyond Borders: New Work on Birgittao of Sweden in Medieval England

Sponsor: Norwegian Research Council ‘Young Research Talents’ Project / ReVISION: Re-Assessing St Birgitta and Her Revelations in Medieval England: Circulation and Influence, 1380-1530

Organiser: Julia King, Institutt for Fremmedspråk, Universitetet i Bergen and Laura Saetveit Miles, Institutt for Fremmedspråk, Universitetet i Bergen

Moderator: Ian Johnson, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies / School of English, University of St Andrews

Paper 323-a: St Birgitta of Sweden in English Manuscript Miscellanies (Language: English), Caitlin Branum Thrash, Department of English, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Paper 323-b: St Thomas More and Syon Abbey: Brigittine Devotional Culture and Early Modern Catholic Humanism (Language: English), Nancy Bradley Warren, Department of English, Texas A&M University, College Station

Paper 323-c: The Vitae of St Birgitta and Syon Abbey: Questioning the Evidence (Language: English), Veronica O’Mara, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 324

Women, Patronage, and Textuality in Medieval Europe

Moderator: Charlotte Pickard, Centre for Continuing & Professional Education, Cardiff University / Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Open University

Paper 324-a: Pious Expression and Personal Safety: Margaret of Scotland’s Deliberate Use of Religious Patronage (Language: English), Lisa Cruikshank, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto

Paper 324-b: Literacy and Learning in the Dominican Nunneries of Late Medieval Portugal (Language: English), Paula Freire Cardoso, Instituto de Estudos Medievais (IEM), Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Paper 324-c: Ivories and Inventories: Tracing Production and Patronage in Late Medieval French Household Records (Language: English), Katherine Rush, Department of the History of Art, University of California, Riverside

Paper 324-d: Pilgrimage, Gender, and Materiality: The Virgin Mary as a Souvenir Hunter (Language: English), Emily Price, Department of History, University of Michigan


19.00-20.30 (BST)

Session: 402

New Ways to use the Index of Medieval Art at Princeton: A Workshop

Organiser: Maria Alessia Rossi, Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University and Jessica Savage, Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University

Moderator: Jessica Savage

In 2017, the Index of Medieval Art launched a new custom database to better serve 21st-century researchers of medieval iconography. This workshop, led by Index specialists Maria Alessia Rossi and Jessica Savage, demonstrates how to use advanced search options, filters, and browse tools, in addition to the new subject classification network to locate iconographic subjects in the Index. This workshop will show participants not just what types of art historical data can be found in the database, but how to locate and interpret the Index’s records to learn more about the Middle Ages. Participants are encouraged to bring research questions to the workshop.


Tuesday 6 July 2021

09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 501

Acting Personifications and Aesthetic Reflection in Word and Image

Sponsor:  Sonderforschungsbereich 1391 ‘Andere Ästhetik’, Eberhard-Karls- Universität Tübingen

Organiser:  Sandra Linden, Sonderforschungsbereich 1391 ‘Andere Ästhetik’, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen and Daniela Wagner, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen

Moderator: Daniela Wagner

Paper 501-a: Action and Interaction: Personifications at the Boundary between Human Embodiment and Artificial Construct (Language: English), Julia Fischer, Sonderforschungsbereich 1391 ‘Andere Ästhetik’, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen

Paper 501-b: Human Relationships and Meaningful Acts: An Insight into Personifications in Medieval Art (Language: English), Katharina Bauer, Sonderforschungsbereich 1391 ‘Andere Ästhetik’, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen

Paper 501-c: Speech Act: The Linguistic Activity of Medieval Personifications as Aesthetic Transgression (Language: English), Jan Stellmann, Sonderforschungsbereich 1391 ‘Andere Ästhetik’, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen


09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 502

Buildings, Patronage, and Policy

Moderator: Duncan Berryman, School of Natural & Built Environment, Queen’s University Belfast

Paper 502-a: Archaeology of the Construction of Religious Buildings in Early Byzantine Ravenna: The Case of Stone Materials (Language: English), Giulia Marsili, Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà, Università di Bologna

Paper 502-b: The St Mary Cathedrals of Hamburg, Hildesheim, and Paderborn in the Early Middle Ages (Language: English), Rona Ettlin, Institut für Geschichte / Institut für Katholische Theologie, Universität Hildesheim

Paper 502-c: The Reception of Roman Baths in 15th-Century Italy (Language: English), Giacomo Savani, School of Classics, University College Dublin


09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 514

The Borders of Climates

Sponsor: National Science Centre Poland Project ‘Alberic of Trois-Fontaines & the 13th-Century Cistercian Vision of the Historical & Cultural Community of Europe’ / Christianitas

Organiser: Antoni Grabowski, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa

Moderator: Polina Ignatova, Independent Scholar, Lancaster

Paper 514-a: The Iconographical Traditions of the Medieval Headless Men and the Type Having His Eyes on His Shoulders (Language: English) Adrienn Orosz, Institute of Library & Information Science, Eötvös Loránd University / National Library of Foreign Literature, Budapest


09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 515

Domesticities

Sponsor: Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien

Organiser: Gerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien

Moderator: Gerhard Jaritz

Paper 515-a: The Material Culture of Domestic Devotion in Livonia (Language: English), Anu Mänd, Institute of History, Archaeology & Art History, Tallinn University


09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 523

A Climate of Devotional Change

Organiser: Philippa Stazicker, Department of History, University of Nottingham

Moderator: Eleanor Cox, Department of History, University of Nottingham

Paper 523-c: ‘A new image of alabaster’: Changes in Ownership and Devotional Use of Midlands Alabaster in Late Medieval England (Language: English), Philippa Stazicker


11.15-12.45 (BST)

Session: 610

Products of Their Environment, II: Ecclesiastical and Monastic

Organiser: Daniel Booker, Department of History, University of Bristol

Moderator: Victoria Hodgson, Department of History, University of Bristol

Paper 610-b: Heaven Sensed: Angel Roofs of East Anglia (Language: English), Oliver Coulson, Department of History of Art & Architecture, Brown University


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 701

Manuscript Production in England, France, and Central Europe: Patrons, Collections, Artists, and Context

Moderator: Katherine Rush, Department of the History of Art, University of California, Riverside

Paper 701-a: Climate of Change: The Case of Production of the Hamburg Apocalypse (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg, Carl von Ossietzky, Codex In Scrinio 87) (Language: English), Polina Yaroslavtseva, Exzellenzcluster ‘Understanding Written Artefacts’, Universität Hamburg

Paper 701-b: ‘Ici faut glose et tixt et premier fuill suivant a tieu signe la troverez’: New Suggestions about Early Ownership of the Paris Apocalypse (Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS Fr. 403), c. 1250-1470 (Language: English), Emerson Richards, Department of Comparative Literature, Indiana University

Paper 701-c: The Voynich Manuscript’s Intellectual Climate and Authorship (Language: English), Keagan Joel Brewer, Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 702

Dust, Diet, and Isotopes: Scientific Analysis of Material Evidence

Moderator: David Stocker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds

Paper 702-a: Hike to Holy Heights: Movement of the Non-Local Saint-Jean-de- Todon Elite (Language: English), Jane Holmstrom, Department of Anthropology, University of Central Florida

Paper 702-b: Elemental and Isotopic Analysis of Dust for Authentication of Historic Manuscripts: Part I (Language: English), Johanna Irrgeher, Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine und Analytische Chemie, Montanuniversität Leoben

 Paper 702-c: Elemental and Isotopic Analysis of Dust for Authentication of Historic Manuscripts: Part II (Language: English), Patricia Engel, Department für Bauen und Umwelt / Zentrum für Kulturgüterschutz, Donau-Universität Krems


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 713

Climate, the Environment, and the Natural World In Byzantium, II: Art, Climate, Death, and Disease

Sponsor: Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham

Organiser: Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham

Moderator: Daniel K. Reynolds, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham

Paper 713-a: Nature into Art the Byzantine Way (Language: English), Liz James, Department of Art History, University of Sussex

Paper 713-b: Mosaic-Making and Climate Change in the Holy Land (Language: English), Henry Maguire, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University

Paper 713-c: Health and Disease in Early Byzantine Burials (Language: English), Laura M. Clark, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham


16.30-18.00 (BST)
Ticket Price (lesson only): £20
Ticket Price (including kit): £40 (plus shipping)

Opus Anglicanum Embroidery Workshop

Directed by Tanya Bentham

‘Opus Anglicanum’ (English work) is fine needlework of medieval England created for ecclesiastical or secular use on clothing, hangings, or other textiles, often using gold and silver threads on rich velvet or linen fabric. This embroidery, usually filled with elaborate imagery including people, animals, and plants, was in great demand across Europe, particularly from the late 12th to mid-14th centuries. A luxury product, it was often used for diplomatic gifts. In 2017, Opus Anglicanum was the subject of an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

This workshop provides a rare opportunity to learn the techniques of Opus Anglicanum. Participants will learn the basic stitches – split and underside – and then put these techniques in practice to create the face of a young woman.

Participants will receive full instructions by PDF including a list of required materials; they will also have the option of purchasing a materials kit from Tanya’s website (Opus Anglicanum Embroidery). The materials kit will include a needle, marked linen canvas, as well as silk and gold threads. While every effort will be made to ensure that the kits can be posted to as many countries as possible, before ordering your kit, please take note of any postal restrictions in your country, as well as any possible customs restrictions. Please bear in mind that some of these restrictions have recently changed due to Brexit coming fully into effect this year.

The class will be delivered via pre-recorded video demonstrations so that participants can work at their own pace. IMC delegates booking the course will also have access to an exclusive Q&A session on Pathable with Tanya during the conference.

Tanya Bentham has been a re-enactor for many years, working the last 20 as a professional living historian. Her main focus has always been on textiles, especially embroidery, but also making detours into costume, natural dyeing, weaving, millinery, and silver-smithing. She has delivered workshops for numerous museums, schools, and community organisations throughout Yorkshire. Her books, Opus Anglicanum: A Handbook and Bayeux Stitch: A Practical Handbook are forthcoming as part of the Crowood Press embroidery series.

If you are interested in participating in this workshop, please express interest when you register for the IMC. Everyone who has expressed interest will be contacted by email nearer to the time and invited to sign up and pay for the workshop via the Opus Anglicanum Embroidery website.


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 801

Images of the Dead, Buried, and Resurrected

Moderator: Diane J. Reilly, Department of Art History, Indiana University, Bloomington

Paper 801-a: Likeness and Legends of Cephalophore Saints (Language: English), Lindsey Johnson, College of Arts & Sciences, Lee University, Tennessee

Paper 801-b: The Visual Ecosystem of the End of Times (Language: English), Katja Fält, Finnish Social Science Data Archive, University of Tampere

Paper 801-c: The Mystery of the Tree of Jesse Tomb Slab in Lincoln Cathedral (Language: English), Jack Wilcox, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 820

The Materiality of Noble Power, IV: Material Culture

Sponsor: Sonderforschungsbereich 933 ‘Materiale Textkulturen’, Ruprecht-Karls- Universität Heidelberg

Organiser: Abby Armstrong, Sonderforschungsbereich 933 ‘Materiale Textkulturen’, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Moderator: Abby Armstrong

Paper 820-a: A Visual Game: Meetings and Comparisons in the Imaging of Power between Francesco and Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Milan, 1450-1476 (Language: English), Carolina Manfredini, Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà, Università di Bologna

Paper 820-b: Shiny Jewels, Embalmed Bodies: Material Culture, Gift Giving, and the Courtly Surface of Power Struggles in Wolfram of Eschenbach’s Parzival (Language: English), Christoph Witt, Friedrich Schlegel Graduiertenschule für literaturwissenschaftliche Studien (FSGS), Freie Universität Berlin

Paper 820-c: Costume and Ostentation to Legitimise the Meteoric Rise of a Nobleman in the Chronicle of Miguel Lucas de Iranzo in 15th- Century Jaén, Spain (Language: English), Julia Roumier, Amérique latine, Pays ibériques (AMERIBER EA 3656), Université Bordeaux Montaigne


Wednesday 7 July 2021

14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 1219

Erasure in Late Antiquity, I: Erasing Text and Image?

Sponsor: Postgraduate & Early-Career Late Antiquity Network

Organiser: Becca Grose, Department of Classics, University of Reading, Rebecca Usherwood, Department of Classics, Trinity College Dublin and Guy Walker, Department of Classics, Trinity College Dublin

Moderator: Samuel James Barber, Medieval Studies Program, Cornell University

Paper 1219-a: Erasing Manuscripts: The Palimpsests of the Monastery of St Catherine in the Sinai (Language: English), Giulia Rossetto, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien

Paper 1219-b: A Word Is Worth a Thousand Images: The Iconophilic Floor Mosaic of the Church of the Virgin in Madaba, Jordan (Language: English), Mathilde Sauquet, Department of Art & Archaeology, Princeton University

Paper 1219-c: Collateral Image?: Rethinking Iconoclasm in Byzantine and Umayyad-Era Jordan and Palestine (Language: English), Fabian Stroth, Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Albert- Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 1222

Watch Your Language: Palindromes, Etymology, and Inscriptions

Moderator: Marco Mostert, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht

Paper 1222-c: Monumental Brasses and Language Choice before and after the Reformation (Language: English), Lena Wahlgren-Smith, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Culture / Department of English, University of Southampton


16.30-18.00 (BST)
Ticket Price (Lesson Only): £5
Ticket Price (Including Kit): £30 (Vegan) / £35 (Leather) (Plus Shipping)

Folded Almanac Girdle Book: A Bookbinding Workshop

Directed By Linette Withers

Girdle books were small portable books worn by monks, clergymen, and aristocratic nobles as a popular accessory to medieval costume between the 13th and 16th centuries. They consisted of a book whose leather binding continued loose below the cover of the book in a long tapered tail with a large knot at the end which could be tucked into one’s girdle or belt. The knot was usually strips of leather woven together for durability. The book hung upside down and backwards so that when swung upwards it was ready for reading.

This class is an irreverent look at making your own useable ‘medieval’ almanac to hang off your belt, loosely inspired by Oxford, Bodleian Library MS. Ashmole 6, a girdle book from the 15th century which contains an astronomical and astrological calendar. Participants can decorate their girdle book pages with their own useful facts and images before or after binding their book. There will also be an option to print out decorative pages, supplied by Anachronalia in advance of the course.

Participants will be sent the full instructions by PDF including a list of required materials and suggested tools and have the option of purchasing a materials kit from Anachronalia in advance of the conference. The materials kit will contain paper, cover materials, glue, thread, needle, and printed instructions. Leather and vegan options are available. Prices shown above do not include shipping. While every effort will be made to ensure the kit can be posted to as many countries as possible, before ordering your kit, please take note of any postal restrictions in your country in regards to leather and glue, as well as any possible customs restrictions. Please bear in mind that some of these restrictions have recently changed in the UK due to Brexit coming fully into effect this year.

The class will be delivered via pre-recorded video demonstrations so that participants can work at their own pace. IMC delegates booking the course will also have access to an exclusive Q&A session on Pathable with Linette during the conference.

Linette Withers completed an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds before joining the IMC team as Senior Congress Officer. She has been binding books since 2005 and since 2012 has worked as a professional book binder, producing codices that are inspired by historical books. One of her works was shortlisted for display at the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford as part of their ‘Redesigning the Medieval Book’ competition and exhibition. She also regularly works with library conservation projects and teaches binding techniques in her studio in Leeds.

If you are interested in participating in this workshop, please express interest when you register for the IMC. Everyone who has expressed interest will be contacted by email nearer to the time and invited to sign up and pay for the workshop via Anachronalia’s website.


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 1301

Materials, Manufacture, Movement: Tracing Connections through Object Itineraries

Sponsor: International Center of Medieval Art

Organiser: Therese Martin, Instituto de Historia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid

Moderator: Therese Martin, Instituto de Historia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid

Paper 1301-a: Linen, Wool, and Silk: Climate Conditions and Textile Production from Egypt to Iberia (Language: English), Ana Cabrera-Lafuente, Instituto del Patrimonio Cultural de España, Madrid

Paper 1301-b: Exquisite yet Handy: On Ivory / Ebony Caskets and the Egypt / Iberia Debate (Language: English), Silvia Armando, Department of Art History & Studio Art, John Cabot University, Rome

Paper 1301-c: Treasuries as Windows to the Medieval World: San Isidoro de León and St Blaise at Braunschweig (Language: English), Jitske Jasperse, Institut für Kunst- und Bildgeschichte, Humboldt- Universität zu Berlin

Paper 1301-d: Women’s Influence, Modern Perceptions, and the Transmission of ‘Culture’ in Medieval Central and Eastern Europe (Language: English), Christian Raffensperger, Department of History, Wittenberg University, Ohio


19.00-20.30 (BST)

Session: 1402

Mass Digitisation of Medieval Manuscripts: How And Why? – A Round Table Discussion, Bodleian Library, Oxford

Matthew L. Holford, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford
Stewart J. Brookes, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford


This round table discussion looks back on two major three-year manuscript digitisation projects. We will explore expectations and lessons learned, and discuss ways to increase the impact of medieval manuscript digitisation and cataloguing projects for both public and academic audiences.


Both projects were generously funded by the Polonsky Foundation. ‘Manuscripts from German-Speaking Lands’ was a three-year collaboration between the Bodleian Libraries in Oxford and the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, digitising 600 medieval manuscripts of Germanic origin or provenance. The Polonsky Foundation ‘Greek Manuscripts Project’ saw a significant collaboration between Cambridge University and Heidelberg University. The project conserved, catalogued, and digitised all the medieval and early modern Greek manuscripts in Cambridge libraries. It also digitised and catalogued the Greek manuscripts of the Bibliotheca Palatina, now physically divided between the Vatican Library and Heidelberg University Library, providing access in total to over 800 Greek manuscripts.

Participants include Tuija Ainonen (University of Oxford), Andrew Dunning (University of Oxford), Suzanne Paul (University of Cambridge), and Torsten Schaßan (Herzog-August-Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel).


Thursday 8 July 2021

09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 1513

Representations of Temperate / Intemperate Emotions in Visual Art and Literature, I: Text and Image

Organiser: Dafna Nissim, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva

Moderator: Vered Tohar, Department of Literature of the Jewish People, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan

Paper 1513-a: Getting Wild: Giant’s Feelings in Schloss Runkelstein (Language: English), Assaf Pinkus, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University

Paper 1513-b: Unexpected and Immoderate: Grinning Heads and Bewildered Grimaces in the 13th Century (Language: English), Elena Lichmanova, School of History, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

Paper 1513-c: Knowledge and Affect in an Illustrated Meditationes vitae Christi Manuscript (Oxford, Corpus Christi College, MS 410) (Language: English), Renana Bartal, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University


09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 1515

British Archaeological Association, I: The Impact of Religious, Political, and Meteorological Climates on Buildings and Landscapes

Sponsor: British Archaeological Association

Organiser: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading

Moderator: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading

Paper 1515-a: Cosmos, or, Building the Phaenomena: A Practical Guide to Space-Travel in English Medieval Church Architecture and Its Universe (Language: English), Caroline Novak, Independent Scholar, Toronto

Paper 1515-b: Tapping the Wild Wood: Managing the Elite Hunting Landscape in the Medieval Vale of York – Perspectives from Hornby and Kirkby Fleetham Castles (Language: English), Erik Matthews, Hornby Castle Project, Northallerton

Paper 1515-c: Changing Religious Climates and the Material Culture of the Tudor Parish Church: St Michael le Belfrey (Language: English), Lisa Reilly, School of Architecture, University of Virginia

11.15-12.45 (BST)

Session: 1613

Representations of Temperate / Intemperate Emotions in Visual Art and Literature, II: Fear and Anger

Organiser: Dafna Nissim, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva

Moderator: Tovi Bibring, Department of French Culture, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan

Paper 1613-a: What Are You So Afraid of?: Scare Tactics in Hebrew Illuminated Manuscripts (Language: English), Sara Offenberg, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva

Paper 1613-b: Illustrating Anger: Divine Retribution in ‘Pèlerine’ (La Vie des pères) (Language: English), Karen G. Casebier, Department of Modern & Classical Languages & Literatures, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga

Paper 1613-c: Self-Control, Rationality, Illusion, and Mutual Respect: A Dominican Poet Addresses His Audience – Ulrich Bonerius’s The Gemstone, 1350 (Language: English), Albrecht Classen, Department of German Studies, University of Arizona


11.15-12.45 (BST)

Session: 1614

British Archaeological Association, II: Climate and The End of The World in Beatus’s Manuscripts and The Osteological Record

Sponsor: British Archaeological Association

Organiser: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading

Moderator: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading

Paper 1614-a: The Subversion of Nature and Cosmic Upheaval in Illuminated Beatus Manuscripts (Language: English), Rose Walker, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London

Paper 1614-b: What Goes around Comes around: Tracking Plague Epidemics and Changes in Climate, 400-1400 (Language: English), Elliot Elliott, Independent Scholar, Cambridge

Paper 1614-c: ‘Honey out of the rock’: Late Medieval Bee Hives at Rosslyn Chapel (Language: English), Lizzie Swarbrick, School of Art History, University of Edinburgh


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 1713

Representations of Temperate / Intemperate Emotions in Visual Art And Literature, III: Virtues and Vices

Organiser: Dafna Nissim, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva

Moderator: Renana Bartal, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University

Paper 1713-a: How Can We Talk about Emotions When We Discuss Virtues and Vices in Art? (Language: English), Dafna Nissim

Paper 1713-b: The Concepts of Legitimate and Illegitimate Laughter in Jewish Pre-Modern Writings (Language: English), Vered Tohar, Department of Literature of the Jewish People, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan

Paper 1713-c: Between Love and Lust in Some Medieval Bed Scenes (Language: English), Tovi Bibring, Department of French Culture, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan and Revital Refael-Vivante, Department of Literature of the Jewish People, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan


Friday 9 July 2021

09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 2015

British Archaeological Association, III: Architecture, Decoration, and The Meanings Within

Sponsor: British Archaeological Association

Organiser: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading

Moderator: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading

Paper 2015-a: Shelter from the Storm: The Importance of Buildings for Protecting Agricultural Produce (Language: English), Duncan Berryman, School of Natural & Built Environment, Queen’s University Belfast

Paper 2015-b: Holy Fountain Heads: How the Shapes and Decoration of English Medieval Water Towers, Chapter Houses, and Sacristies Proclaimed Their Function as Sources of Divine Water (Language: English), Lesley Milner, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London

Paper 2015-c: A 14th-Century Funerary Effigy at Furness Abbey (Language: English), Michael Carter, Curatorial Department, English Heritage, London


09.00-10.30 (BST)

Session: 2016

(Un)Bound Bodies, I

Organiser: Lauren Rozenberg, Department of History of Art, University College London

Moderator: Jack Ford, Department of History, University College London

Paper 2016-a: Castrating Ovid: Christine de Pisan and the Medieval Ovidian Body (Language: English), Rebecca Menmuir, Faculteit der Letteren, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen

Paper 2016-b: Beyond Anatomy: Guido da Vigevano’s Corporeal Work (Language: English), Lauren Rozenberg

Paper 2016-c: Flesh Side: Sharing Bodies with New Haven, Beinecke Rare Books & Manuscripts Library, MS 84 (Language: English), Kayla Lunt, Department of Art History, Indiana University, Bloomington


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 2205

Bringing Texts Back from The Dead, Sealing Practices, And Good Vibrations…

Organiser: Stewart J. Brookes, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

Moderator: Stewart J. Brookes, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

Paper 2205-a: Old Texts in a New Light: Multispectral Imaging in the Archive and the Classroom (Language: English), Helen Davies, Department of English, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

Paper 2205-b: Measuring Change through Time and Space: Exploring the Potential of Large Sigillographic Datasets (Language: English), John McEwan, Center for Digital Humanities, Saint Louis University, Missouri

Paper 2205-c: Haptics in Manuscript Studies: Virtual Reality as a Road to Inclusion and Better Scholarship (Language: English), Bill Endres, Department of English, University of Oklahoma


14.15-15.45 (BST)

Session: 2223

The Many Beckets, II: The Cult of St Thomas Becket and Material Culture

Sponsor: Exploring the Past Pathway, Cardiff University

Organiser: Paul Webster, Exploring the Past Pathway, Cardiff University

Moderator: Louise J. Wilkinson, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln

Paper 2223-a: Links between Canterbury Pilgrims’ Ampullas and the Imposition of the Tabula Badge on Jews in Early 13th-Century England (Language: English), Rachel Koopmans, Department of History, York University, Toronto

Paper 2223-b: The Cult of Becket and the Material Culture of Devotion in Later Medieval London (Language: English), Eliot Benbow, School of History, Queen Mary University of London / Museum of London

Paper 2223-c: Four Candles: Royal Gifts of Objects in Honour of St Thomas of Canterbury (Language: English), Paul Webster


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 2303

Representing The Natural World

Moderator: Cathy Hume, Department of English, University of Bristol

Paper 2303-a: Caterpillars in the Garden: Divine Agricultural Intervention in Gregory I’s Dialogues (Language: English), Alyssa Van Haitsma Kotva, Department of History, Ohio State University

Paper 2303-b: ‘Le printemps perpétuel’: Art, Nature, and the Impossible Garden in Medieval French Literature, Visual, and Material Culture (Language: English), Charlotte Spencer, School of Modern Languages & Cultures, Durham University

Paper 2303-c: Nature between Human and God: Floristic Ornaments in the 14th-Century Book of Hours (Language: English), Oleksandr Okhrimenko, Department of Ancient & Medieval History, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv

Paper 2303-d: From natura to Nature: The Pastoral Mode and Rising Humanism in Medieval Poetic Debates (Language: English), Kathleen Burt, Department of English, Middle Georgia State University


16.30-18.00 (BST)

Session: 2316

Textiles in the Climate of Political, Economic, and Religious Change

Sponsor: Discussion, Interpretation & Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics & Fashion (DISTAFF)

Organiser: Gale Owen-Crocker, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Manchester

Moderator: Monica L. Wright, Department of Modern Languages, University of Louisiana, Lafayette

Paper 2316-a: The Crossover of Design Motifs in Early Medieval Art from Early Medieval England: Metalwork to Embroidery, Embroidery to Metalwork, or Wider Material Cultural Influences? (Language: English), Alexandra M. Lester-Makin, School of Humanities (Archaeology), University of Glasgow

Paper 2316-b: A Climate of Exchange: Saintly Bones, Imported Silks, and Religious Devotion to Cologne’s Cult of the Virgin Martyrs in the 14th Century (Language: English), Claire Kilgore, Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin- Madison

Paper 2316-c: Reflecting a Woven Identity: The Impact of a Global Economic Climate on Two Lucchese Church Façades (Language: English), Tania Kolarik, Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin- Madison


Published by Roisin Astell

Roisin Astell received a First Class Honours in History of Art at the University of York (2014), under the supervision of Dr Emanuele Lugli. After spending a year learning French in Paris, Roisin then completed an MSt. in Medieval Studies at the University of Oxford (2016), where she was supervised by Professor Gervase Rosser and Professor Martin Kauffmann. In 2017, Roisin was awarded a CHASE AHRC studentship as a doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, under the supervision of Dr Emily Guerry.

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