New Publication: ‘Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts,’ edited by Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing

The presence of gold, silver, and other metals is a hallmark of decorated manuscripts, the very characteristic that makes them “illuminated.” Medieval artists often used metal pigment and leaf to depict metal objects both real and imagined, such as chalices, crosses, tableware, and even idols; the luminosity of these representations contrasted pointedly with the surrounding paints, enriching the page and dazzling the viewer. To elucidate this key artistic tradition, this volume represents the first in-depth scholarly assessment of the depiction of precious-metal objects in manuscripts and the media used to conjure them. From Paris to the Abbasid caliphate, and from Ethiopia to Bruges, the case studies gathered here forge novel approaches to the materiality and pictoriality of illumination. In exploring the semiotic, material, iconographic, and technical dimensions of these manuscripts, the authors reveal the canny ways in which painters generated metallic presence on the page. Illuminating Metalwork is a landmark contribution to the study of the medieval book and its visual and embodied reception, and is poised to be a staple of research in art history and manuscript studies, accessible to undergraduates and specialists alike.

Joseph Salvatore Ackley, Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, USA; Shannon L. Wearing, Pontifical Inst. of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, Canada.

Contents:

I INTRODUCTION
Preciousness on Parchment: Materiality, Pictoriality, and the Decorated Book 
Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing 
1
II TECHNIQUE
Surface Effect and Substance: Precious Metals in Illuminated Manuscripts 
Nancy K. Turner 
51
III REPRESENTATION
Metal Labor, Material Conversions: Goldsmiths in the Life of St. Denis and in Parisian Life, ca. 1300 
Brigitte Buettner 
113
Copying, Imitation, and Intermediality in Illuminated Ethiopic Manuscripts from the Early Solomonic Period 
Jacopo Gnisci 
139
The Colors of Metalworks: The Painted Materials of Machinery in Byzantium 
Roland Betancourt 
167
IV MATERIAL TRANSLATIONS
Metal, Materiality, and Maṣāḥif: Ornamentation in Abbasid Qur’ans 
Beatrice Leal 
199
Manuscript as Metalwork: Haptic Vision in Early Carolingian Gospel Books 
Beth Fischer 
223
A “Multimedia” Manuscript: Metalwork and the Siegburg Lectionary 
Heidi C. Gearhart 
247
Illuminating Luxury: The Gray-Gold Flemish Grisailles 
Sophia Ronan Rochmes 
275
V TREASURIES IN BOOKS, BOOKS AS TREASURIES
The Golden Spaces of the Uta Codex 
Eliza Garrison 
303
The Matter of Memory: Illuminated Metalwork in the Vita of St. Albinus of Angers 
Sasha Gorjeltchan 
333
Packaging the Sainte-Chapelle Relic Treasury, Paris ca. 1500 
Julia Oswald 
361
VI PHENOMENOLOGY AND PIETY
Pilgrimage across Borders: Painted Pilgrim’s Badges in Flemish Illuminated Manuscripts 
Megan H. Foster-Campbell 
393
Peripheral Primacy: Metallic Illumination and Material Illusion in the Aussem Hours 
Susan Barahal and Elizabeth Pugliano 
421
A Curator’s Note: The Tarnished Reception of Remarkable Manuscripts 
Lynley Anne Herbert 
443
Bibliography 463
Index of Manuscripts 505
Index of Names 511
Index of Places 515
Subject Index 519

Published by Ellie Wilson

Ellie Wilson holds a First Class Honours in the History of Art from the University of Bristol, with a particular focus on Medieval Florence. In 2020 she achieved a Distinction in her MA at The Courtauld Institute of Art, where she specialised in the art and architecture of Medieval England under the supervision of Dr Tom Nickson. Her dissertation focussed on an alabaster altarpiece, and its relationship with the cult of St Thomas Becket in France and the Chartreuse de Vauvert. Her current research focusses on the artistic patronage of London’s Livery Companies immediately pre and post-Reformation. Ellie will begin a PhD at the University of York in Autumn 2021 with a WRoCAH studentship, under the supervision of Professor Tim Ayers and Dr Jeanne Nuechterlein.

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