Registration Now Open: Communities and Networks in Late Medieval Europe, International Virtual Conference, 9-10 September 2021

Registration is now open for Communities and Networks in Late Medieval Europe. Register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/communities-and-networks-in-late-medieval-europe-c-13001500-registration-165407840303

Historical research has witnessed a rapidly growing interest in ‘networks’ since the turn of the twenty-first century, as seen in ambitious endeavours such as the foundation of the Journal of Historical Network Research in 2017. This is due not only to the utility of networks in describing interrelations between historical actors, but also to the adoption of the concepts and methodologies associated with social network analysis (SNA).

Communities and Networks in Late Medieval Europe aims to build on and contribute to this expanding field of research by exploring how the descriptive, conceptual, and methodological tools provided by the study of networks can deepen our understanding of the complex sets of relationships between and within different types of communities in the specific context of the last two centuries of the European Middle Ages. The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries were a time of great political, socio-economic, and cultural change in Europe: the period in question, therefore, offers numerous exciting opportunities (and challenges) for the application of network-based approaches to the study of community dynamics.

You can find the conference programme at https://communitiesandnetworks21.files.wordpress.com/2021/08/communities-and-networks-in-late-medieval-europe-c.-1300e280931500.pdf

You can also visit the website (https://communitiesandnetworks21.wordpress.com) and follow on Twitter at @commsandnets21.

Published by charlottecook

Charlotte Cook graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor’s degree in European History from Washington & Lee University in 2019. In 2020 she received her Master’s degree in History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, earning the classification of Merit. Her research explores questions of royal patronage, both by and in honor of rulers, in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England. She has worked as a researcher and collections assistant at several museums and galleries, and plans to begin her PhD in the autumn of 2022.

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