Online Conference: Medieval Travel: Harlaxton Online Medieval Zoomposium, 26–30 July 2021, 14:30–19:00 (BST)

This year’s Harlaxton Medieval Symposium on the theme of Medieval Travel will take place online via Zoom, Monday 26 July – Friday 30 July 2021.

Registration for all five days: £15 (students/unwaged £10)

Get your tickets here.

Find out more here.

Conference Programme

Monday, 26 July 2021:

2.30 – 4.00 PM            Session 1A      Travel Writing

Welcome:  Martha Carlin

  • Martha Driver:  Mandeville in the Twenty-First Century
  • Nicholas Orme: William Worcester: Traveller and Collector

5.00 – 6.30 PM            Session 1B       Images and Travel

  • Lynda Dennison: Travelling Artists and Travelling Books        
  • Nicholas Rogers: Visual Souvenirs of the Emperor Sigismund’s Visit to England in 1416

8.00 – 9.30 PM            Session 1C       Pamela Tudor-Craig Memorial Lecture

Julia Boffey: Richard Arnold’s Book

Tuesday, 27 July 2021:

2.30 – 4.00 PM            Session 2A      Maps

  • Alfred Hiatt: Maps and Travel
  • David Harrison: A Road Map of Medieval England

5.00 – 6.30 PM            Session 2B       Sources for Travel (panel)

  • Robert Swanson: Visitation and Church Court Records
  • Joel Rosenthal: Proofs of Age
  • Joanna Mattingly: Churchwardens’ Accounts
  • David Harrap: Travel Coffers
  • Anthony Gross: Three Travel Objects

8.00 – 9.30 PM            Session 2C       Student posters I

Wednesday, 28 July 2021:

2.30 – 4.00 PM            Session 3A      Inns

  • Martha Carlin: Inns, Horses, and Stabling
  • Laura Wright: Inn Clusters in London in the Fifteenth Century

5.00 – 6.30 PM            Session 3B       Entertainment and Travel

  • Simon Polson: Travelling Minstrels
  • Alexandra Johnston: Travelling Entertainers and Their Patrons: York, 1446-9

8.00 – 9.30 PM            Session 3C       Student posters II

Thursday, 29 July 2021:

2.30 – 4.00 PM            Session 4A      Travel and the Body

  • Carole Rawcliffe: ‘Do not stop at Famagusta’: Travel and Health in the Later Middle Ages
  • Kelcey Wilson-Lee: Travel and Childbirth

5.00 – 6.30 PM            Session 4B       Women Travellers

  • Anthony Bale: Margery Kempe and the Female Traveller in the Later Middle Ages
  • Bart Lambert and Josh Ravenhill: Travelled Women in the Capital: Opportunities for Immigrant Women in London during the Later Middle Ages

8.00 – 9.30 PM            Session 4C       Poster Judging & Book Launch           

  • Judging of student posters
  • Launch of Harlaxton Medieval Symposia volume(s)

Friday, 30 July 2021:

2:30 – 4:00 PM            Session 5A      Travel Wonders

  • Alan Thacker: Travels of St Wulfram
  • Shayne Legassie: Botanical Wonder and Medieval Travel

5:00 – 6:30 PM            Session 5B       Travel and the Exotic

  • Melanie Taylor: In Search of the Exotic: Visual Evidence of Knowledge and Trade in Simians, Birds, and Wingless Dragons
  • Kate Franklin: From Marvels to Motels: Imagined and Infrastructural Worlds of the Silk Road Travel

Final words: Caroline Barron

Published by Roisin Astell

Roisin Astell received a First Class Honours in History of Art at the University of York (2014), under the supervision of Dr Emanuele Lugli. After spending a year learning French in Paris, Roisin then completed an MSt. in Medieval Studies at the University of Oxford (2016), where she was supervised by Professor Gervase Rosser and Professor Martin Kauffmann. In 2017, Roisin was awarded a CHASE AHRC studentship as a doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, under the supervision of Dr Emily Guerry.

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