Tag Archives: talk

Talk: Michael Carter, 12th November Relics and monastic identity in late medieval England

Michael Carter, Senior Historian at English Heritage, analyses the importance of relics in the construction of monastic identities in late medieval England. It will focus on two Benedictine (Battle and Whitby) and two Cistercian (Hailes and Rievaulx) abbeys. He will demonstrate that these monasteries used relics to promote and sustain their wider religious role until the time of the Suppression, and that relics were also used to affirm relations between religious houses. Relics and the development of local liturgical observance will also be discussed. Calling upon relic lists, chronicles, heraldry, wills and extant material remains, Michael will also give an idea of the broad range of sources available for the study of the cult of relics at English monasteries, and show that significant material remains unexplored or capable of reinterpretation. The talk is a work in progress, and presents preliminary findings from a projected large-scale study into relics and monasteries in the two centuries before the Suppression.

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The talk takes place on Tuesday 12th November, at 5pm in the History of Art Department (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in The Keynes Library (Room 114).

Like all the seminars, the talk will finish by 5.50pm to allow those with other commitments to leave, and is then followed by discussion and refreshments.  

These talks are supported by the Murray Bequest in memory of the Department’s founder Peter Murray, and are open to all.

No booking required, but if you are sure you are coming it can be helpful to our planning if you let us know here  http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=8569

Lecture: Annual Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland lecture (Courtauld Institute, 24/04/18, 5:30pm)

Prof-Malcolm-Thurlby

Lecture:  ‘English Romanesque Sculpture in its Architectural Context’, by Professor Malcolm Thurlby FSA

Annual Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland lecture

Where: Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, Courtauld Institute

Date: 24th April 2018, 5:30pm

This year’s CRSBI annual public lecture, delivered by Professor Malcolm Thurlby of York University, Toronto, Canada, will consider English Romanesque sculpture in the context of its architectural matrix, focusing on specific carved elements such as portals, tympana, capitals, and figural reliefs. It will set out to demonstrate the fundamental importance of forensic visual analysis to our understanding of a Romanesque building and its ornament, most notably where documentary information is lacking. The diagnostic potential of a range of material evidence – painted decoration, the use of stucco, the work of 19th-century copyists – will be seen to support proposed dating sequences at a number of monuments, including the cathedrals of Worcester, Hereford and Ely and the abbey at Malmesbury, and at lesser churches such as Knook in Wiltshire, Leigh in Worcestershire, Milborne Port in Somerset, and Kirkburn in Yorkshire.

Malcolm Thurlby studied art history at the University of East Anglia. His PhD thesis on Transitional Sculpture in England 1150—1240 (1976) was supervised by Eric Fernie. He teaches art and architectural history at York University, Toronto. His research focuses on Romanesque and Gothic architecture and sculpture, and on 19th- and early 20th-century architecture in Canada. He concurs with Bishop John Medley (1804-92) that ‘some knowledge of Church Architecture ought, surely, to be a part of every liberal education.’

Entry to the lecture is free and open to all. The Courtauld would like all those wishing to attend to register beforehand: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/english-romanesque-sculpture-in-its-architectural-context-tickets-44591422144

The Courtauld lecture theatre is accessed via the doors opposite the main gallery entrance. Ask at the reception desk on arrival for further directions.

For more information click here.