Tag Archives: Dress

Nearness|Rift: Art and Time in the Textiles of Medieval Britain (16 April 2016)

Opus-AnglicanumNearness | Rift: Art and Time in the Textiles of Medieval Britain will gather a multidisciplinary group of scholars to address a range of historiographical and methodological problems implicit in the study of textiles, and to discuss new case studies from medieval Britain.

The colloquium will take place during the morning and afternoon of April 16, 2016 in Cochrane-Woods 157 on the University of Chicago campus. (Please enter the building through the north doors rather than through the Smart Museum courtyard.)

9:30 – 10:00 AM: Coffee.

10:00 – 10:15 AM: Introduction by Luke A. Fidler (Doctoral Student, Department of Art History, University of Chicago).

10:1511:15 AM: Keynote lecture by Thomas E. A. Dale (Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison): “Materiality, Metaphor and the Senses: Elite Textile Cultures of Medieval England in their Global Contexts.”

11:30 AM12:15 PM: Valerie Garver (Associate Professor of History, Northern Illinois University): “Garments as Means of Communication Between Anglo-Saxon England and the Carolingian World.”

Respondent: Tristan Sharp (Doctoral Student, Department of History, University of Chicago).

12:15 – 1:30 PM: Lunch.

1:30 – 2:15 PM: Christina Normore (Assistant Professor of Art History, Northwestern University): “The Outlier as Exemplar: The ‘Bayeux Tapestry’ in English Textile History.”

Respondent: Carly B. Boxer (Doctoral Student, Department of Art History, University of Chicago).

2:30 – 3:15 PM: Claire Jenson (Doctoral Candidate, Department of Art History, University of Chicago): “Exeter’s Vesture: John Grandisson on Vestments in the Liturgy.”

Respondent: Karin Krause (Assistant Professor of Byzantine Theology and Visual Culture, University of Chicago).

3:15 – 3:30 PM: Coffee.

3:45 – 4:15 PM: Nancy Feldman (Lecturer in Art History, Theory, and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago): “Cultural Politics and the Term Opus Anglicanum in Late Medieval England.”

Respondent: Julie Orlemanski (Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, University of Chicago).

4:15 – 5:00 PM: Closing remarks by Aden Kumler (Associate Professor of Art History, University of Chicago) and final discussion.

 

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Lecture: Fashionable goods in Early Modern Europe, 1550-1700

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INAUGURAL LECTURE: PROFESSOR EVELYN WELCH, Fashionable goods in Early Modern Europe, 1550-1700

Great Hall King’s Building Strand Campus
When: 05/03/2014 (18:30)
This event is open to all and free to attend, but booking is required via our Eventbrite page.
Registration URL: http://evelynwelch.eventbrite.co.uk

Thinking through things:

An Inaugural Lecture by Professor Evelyn Welch, Vice Principal (Arts & Sciences)

The Victoria & Albert Museum has two late seventeenth-century dolls known as ‘Lord and Lady Clapham’ on display. Wearing Chinese silks, fine lace head-dresses, kimono-style banyans and carrying full face masks, gaming bags, the two figures represented the height of what was regarded as fashionable in Europe in around 1692.  But how did these goods and styles become so desirable and spread so quickly across so many countries?

This lecture looks at a range of fashionable items, goods that took on iconic status in England, France, Holland, Italy, Spain and Scandinavia focusing on what we can learn by studying the things themselves. Drawing on research undertaken as part of a major collaborative research project, ‘Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in Europe, 1500-1800’ (www.fashioningtheearlymodern.ac.uk) funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA), it looks at ruffs, tippets, muffs, masks and other fashions which spread, disappeared and re-emerged in different guises between 1550 and 1700. Now often dismembered, buried and forgotten, it is only by bringing together the surviving objects and their representations that we can begin to explore how fashion worked in Early Modern Europe.

Professor Welch graduated from Harvard University with a BA in Renaissance History and Literature (Magna cum Laude) and received her PhD from the Warburg Institute, University of London. She has taught at the Universities of Essex, Birkbeck, Sussex and Queen Mary, University of London, where she served as Dean of Arts and Vice-Principal for Research and International Affairs before taking on the role of Vice-Principal for Arts & Sciences at King’s College London.  Professor Welch has led a range of major research programmes including The Material Renaissance which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Getty Foundation and Beyond Text: Performances, Sounds, Images, Objects, a £5.5 million AHRC strategic research programme which ran from 2005-2012. She has published extensively on European art and material culture between 1300 and 1700 including books such as Art in Renaissance Italy, (Oxford, 200), Shopping in the Renaissance (Yale, 2005) and Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence (Rodopi, 2011). Professor Welch currently serves as a trustee of the Victoria & Albert Museum where she chairs the collections committee.