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Call for conference session papers Call for Session Proposals Leeds International Medieval Congress Uncategorized

CFP: Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session, 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018

mjc-logo-lrgCall for For Session Proposals, Mary Jaharis Center’s sponsored session, 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018
Deadline: September 1, 2017
The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.
The thematic strand for the 2018 IMC is “Memory.” See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2018_call.html) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.
Session proposals should be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/25th-imc). The deadline for submission is September 1, 2017. Proposals should include:
**Title
**100-word session abstract
**Session moderator and academic affiliation
**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
**CV
Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.
If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.
The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.
Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.
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Leeds International Medieval Congress

6 CfP for ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

[1] Venice, Materiality, and the Byzantine World

[2] De-Centering the Romanesque

[3] Creative Modes of Activating the Early Medieval Manuscript

[4] Creative Strategies of Intellectual Engagement with Tradition and the Auctores

[5] “Manuscripts in the Curriculum”: New Perspectives on Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Undergraduate Classroom from Special Collection Librarians, Faculty, and Booksellers (A Roundtable)

[6] Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

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[1]

Venice, Materiality, and the Byzantine World

Sponsored by the Italian Art Society, 

Deadline: Sep 15, 2017

The Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium leading to the 2010 publication of San Marco, Byzantium, and the Myths of Venice introduced new perspectives on Byzantine and Venetian visual and material culture that extended Otto Demus’s survey of Saint Mark’s basilica. The authors’ application of more recent approaches—such as the social function of spolia, the act of display, the construction of identity, and cultural hybridity—brought fresh analyses to a complex and richly decorated monument. This panel seeks to expand this methodological discourse by taking into account questions related to materials, materiality, and intermediality between Venice and Byzantium. The arrival of material culture from the Byzantine world to Venice as gifts, spoils, or ephemera during the centuries surrounding the Fourth Crusade allowed for both appropriation and conceptual transformation of material culture. In light of the renewal in interest of Venice’s Byzantine heritage, this panel seeks to reflect on the interaction of material culture between la Serenissima and the Byzantine world, especially during the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. Topics may be wide-ranging, including, but not limited to: issues of reception and cultural translation; changing concepts of preciousness; different valuation of materials between Venice and Byzantium; the fluctuating simulation of material visual effects; the transformation of Byzantine objects incorporated into Venetian frames; intermedial dialogue between Byzantine and Venetian art; and the process and technique of manufacture of works between Byzantium and Venice. Some points of departure may include: the building of San Marco itself; Byzantine objects in the Treasury; Byzantine manuscripts included as part of the Cardinal Bessarion gift to the Republic; the monuments on Torcello; or issues raised as a result of recent conservation projects. New cross-cultural methodologies from art historical, anthropological, or sociological fields are welcome.
Please submit a 300-word abstract and a completed Participant 
Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) by 

September 15 to the session organizers:

Brad Hostetler, Kenyon College, hostetler1@kenyon.edu, Joseph Kopta, Pratt Institute, jkopta@pratt.edu
In addition to the travel awards available to all Congress participants (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/awards), the Italian Art Society offers competitive travel grants: http://italianartsociety.org/grants-opportunities/travel-grant-information/

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[2]

De-Centering the Romanesque

Dommuseum Hildesheim & The J. Paul Getty Museum

The canonical emphasis of Romanesque studies on regional centers and monuments has overshadowed aspects of transregional exchange that defined the art and culture of medieval western Europe circa 1000-1250. One of the key characteristics of this period is movement — of peoples, ideas, and materials. This session will explore the themes of portability and exchange, with possible topics addressing Mediterranean and Baltic trade networks, transcultural objects in the western treasuries, pseudo-scripts and their varied meanings, and hoards versus monuments. Participants are encouraged to address the concept of nexus versus center and the pedagogical implications for presenting a de-centered and global Romanesque, with papers that either challenge or affirm the Romanesque frame for teaching medieval art, both in the classroom and in the museum.

Please send your proposal of up to one page with your Participant Information Form (PIF) http://wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF to the organizers: Kristen Collins, J. Paul Getty Museum, KCollins@getty.edu or Gerhard Lutz, Dommuseum Hildesheim, gerhard.lutz@dommuseum-hildesheim.de

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[3] and [4]

Deadline: Sep 1, 2017

Two sessions for, “Identifying Creative Impulses in Early Medieval Art and Culture,” will convene at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, MI.

Papers are solicited that encourage novel—even experimental—approaches, to the exploration and identification of various conceptions of early medieval, creative cultural activity. 

The first panel seeks to engage with the actual haptic and experiential practice of manufacturing, reading and studying the early medieval book.

The second panel focuses upon culturally apposite forms of interpretative and compositional fashioning that can be discerned in manuscripts belonging to the liberal arts traditions of the Early Middle Ages.

Abstracts and paper proposals of not more than 250 words can be submitted via email on or before September 1, 2017 to the session organizers: Eric Ramírez-Weaver (emr6m@virginia.edu) and Lynley Anne Herbert (lherbert@thewalters.org). Please copy both co-organizers when submitting a proposal, posing a question, or requesting additional information via email.

Complete panel descriptions follow. We particularly encourage inventive strategies promising new approaches to the investigation of early medieval creativity.

Identifying Creative Impulses in Early Medieval Art and Culture
Special Sessions organized by Eric Ramírez-Weaver (emr6m@virginia.edu) and Lynley Anne Herbert (lherbert@thewalters.org)

I. Creative Modes of Activating the Early Medieval Manuscript

The way a manuscript behaves when used “in the flesh,” so to speak, can at times reveal layers of creativity built into them, which must be actively experienced rather than passively seen. Often as modern scholars we work from digitized images of individual folios, or at best openings, and “page flipping” technologies (such as the Walters’s “Ex Libris” platform or the British Library’s “Turning the Pages” program) provide a false sense that we are experiencing the physical book. Evidence of the performative qualities of a manuscript can at times be rediscovered, not just in the sense of how a reader might perform the text written in the book, but how the user activated the book as an object during use. Does an image show through a page and become part of the visual experience on the other side, and was there intentionality there? Do images interact across an opening? Does imagery function together from recto to verso? How is the artist creating an experience for the user, or conversely, how did the user alter the book to create a personal experience? This session seeks papers that explore creative approaches that open up new possibilities regarding how early medieval manuscripts functioned as objects.
II. Creative Strategies of Intellectual Engagement with Tradition and the Auctores

Recent scholarship (consider Benjamin Anderson, Lynda Coon, Paul Edward Dutton, Rosamond McKitterick, Lawrence Nees, Eric Ramírez-Weaver, and Immo Warntjes), has increasingly emphasized the creative strategies for intervention and manufacture of meaning that were acutely linked to early medieval eastern and western engagements with various aspects of the liberal art traditions. From star pictures to poetic acrostics, devotion to erudition and pious personal reform transformed the possibilities for innovation that proliferated during the Carolingian period. Interlocking networks of artists, chroniclers, historians, and poets communicated their translations, textual redactions, and visual records of classical tradition and contemporary study with one another, engaged in debate or collaboration, but advancing science. This session seeks papers willing to reconsider methodologically apposite ways to reinterpret the various brands of early medieval creativity manifest in texts pertaining (as broadly as possible) to the seven liberal arts, including texts of astronomical, computistical, rhetorical, geometric, arithmetic, musical, lyrical, philosophical, diagrammatic, or historical significance.

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[5]

“Manuscripts in the Curriculum”: New Perspectives on Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Undergraduate Classroom from Special Collection Librarians, Faculty, and Booksellers (A Roundtable)

Deadline: Sep 10, 2017

Integrating medieval manuscripts into an undergraduate curriculum changes the game. Students are transformed from passive learners to active scholars; observing objects and seeking to understand and interpret their context teaches critical thinking. Implementing programs to give students this opportunity requires the cooperation of special collection librarians and faculty, two disciplines that speak slightly different languages. Inspired by Les Enluminures’s new program Manuscripts in the Curriculum<http://www.textmanuscripts.com/curatorial-services/manuscripts&gt;, this session will also introduce a third perspective and explore the practical issues of how to build collections for teaching.

The session organizers wish to bring people together from these communities to share their experiences, to discuss successful results, to analyze problems, and to envision future directions. We invite papers that explore efforts to bring manuscripts into the classroom, and the challenges of implementing these programs at specific institutions from the perspectives of librarians, faculty, and booksellers. The session will be structured as a roundtable with a series of short ten- and fifteen-minute papers (the number and duration to be determined depending on response), with ample time for discussion.

Please send abstracts of no more than a page, along with a current CV and the Participation Information Form (available on the Medieval Congress Submissions page: http://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to lauralight@lesenluminures.com<mailto:lauralight@lesenluminures.com> by September 10, and sooner if possible.
Emily Runde, Text Manuscripts Specialist

Les Enluminures

http://www.lesenluminures.com&lt;http://www.lesenluminures.com&gt;

http://www.textmanuscripts.com&lt;http://www.textmanuscripts.com&gt;
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[6]

Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

Deadline: Sep 10, 2017

(Courtauld Institute of Art) and Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne). Deadline: 10 September 2017

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artefacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts. For more information visit: http://www.medievalart.org/kress-travel-grant/

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Funding and scholarships

STIP: Akademisches Foerderprogramm 2017-2020 (BKM)

logo_bkge.jpgDie Beauftragte der Bundesregierung für Kultur und Medien (BKM) fördert wissenschaftliche und kulturelle Projekte zur Erforschung und Präsentation von Kultur und Geschichte der Deutschen im östlichen Europa. Ein besonderes Augenmerk gilt dabei den Wechselwirkungen mit den Nachbarkulturen.

Ausgeschrieben werden zwei Förderprogramme für Universitäten und außeruniversitäre Forschungseinrichtungen für die Jahre 2017-2020:

Objekt – Material – Kultur: Dokumentation und Erforschung des materiellen Kulturerbes der Deutschen im östlichen Europa

und

Deutsch-jüdische Lebenswelten im östlichen Europa

Zum Ausfüllen und Speichern der Formulare verwenden Sie bitte den Acrobat Reader unter folgendem Link Adobe.

Bitte beachten Sie, dass die Anträge im Rahmen dieses Förderprogramms direkt beim BKGE eingereicht werden müssen.

http://www.bkge.de/Foerderungen-Stipendien-BKM/Universitaeres-Foerderprogramm.php

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Funding opportunity: Getty Library Research Grants, deadline October 17, 2016

getty_logo_og

Funding opportunity: Getty Library Research Grants, Getty Research Institute Library
Application deadline: October 17, 2016

Getty Library Research Grants provide partial, short-term support to
researchers of all nationalities whose projects demonstrate a
compelling need to use Getty Research Institute materials, and whose
place of residence is more than 80 miles from the Getty Center in Los
Angeles.

How to apply: Applications for the 2017 Getty Library Research Grants are now
available online at
http://www.getty.edu/foundation/initiatives/residential/library_research_grants.html

Please contact GRI Library Reference with any questions:
reference@getty.edu.

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Funding and scholarships

University of York MA in Stained Glass Conservation and Heritage Management

hoa-glassgreen

The University of York’s MA in Stained Glass Conservation and Heritage Management is pleased to announce the numerous scholarship and funding opportunities available for students starting in September 2016.

This MA is the only course in Britain for the study of stained glass conservation and remains the only programme in the English-speaking world.  York has unmatched resources in the Minster and city churches, its leading conservation studios and the Department’s lively Stained Glass Research School. This innovative programme offers an integrated study of stained glass and its conservation. Taught in partnership with the Department of Archaeology, the programme provides training for a variety of employment in stained glass conservation workshops, cultural heritage management, arts administration, administration of historic buildings and museums, and for higher research degrees.

We are happy to announce that The York Glaziers Trust will be celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2017, and as part of its celebrations will be awarding one MA in Stained Glass student entering in 2016 a £10,000 scholarship for the two year programme (open to UK/EU/Overseas applicants).  There will also be funding available from the Worshipful Company of Glaziers, NADFAS (National Association of Decorative and Fine Art Societies) and we will be announcing some further scholarships soon.

Stained Glass students are also eligible to apply for the following History of Art scholarships: WRoCAH Research Preparation Masters scholarships and the Ede & Ravenscroft Bridge Scholarship in History of Art (Please note that these scholarships will only apply to Year 1 of the SG MA). Details of these two scholarships can be found here. 2016 also sees the introduction of the New Postgraduate Loans Scheme. There is also a York Graduate Loyalty Discount for continuing York students. A full list of overseas funding opportunities can be found here.

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Funding and scholarships

Grants: Italian Art Society (deadline 10th January 2016)

IAS-logoNEW! The IAS is pleased to announce a new IAS Dissertation Research Grant to be awarded to graduate students engaged in doctoral dissertation research – on any area of Italian art and architecture from prehistory to the present – to subsidize research travel and other expenses.

Send applications and proposals to Dr Janis Elliott at awards@italianartsociety.org

Deadline for proposals:  10 January 2016.  See more at  http://italianartsociety.org/grants-opportunities/ias-research-and-publication-grants/

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NEW! Beginning in 2016, the IAS Research and Publication Grant will be awarded only to scholars holding the Ph.D. to subsidize a research trip or a publication (i.e., for purchasing image rights or as a publication subvention). Research may be on any area of Italian art and architecture from prehistory to the present.   Send applications and proposals to Dr Janis Elliott at awards@italianartsociety.org

Deadline for proposals: 10 January 2016.   See more at http://italianartsociety.org/grants-opportunities/ias-research-and-publication-grants/

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NEW!  Fogliano/Lester Research Grant! Thanks to the generosity of one of our patron members, Mr. Peter Fogliano, beginning in January 2016 the IAS will be able to offer two new additional research and publication grants of up to $1000.00 each. One will be for graduate students and the other for holders of the Ph.D. whose projects concern art and architecture in Italy between ca. 1250 and ca. 1600. These grants are named in honor of Peter Fogliano and Hal Lester.

The Fogliano/Lester Research grants will be reviewed and selected from the pool of IAS Dissertation and IAS Research and Publication Grants. No special application necessary.

Send applications and proposals to Dr Janis Elliott at:  awards@italianartsociety.org

Deadline for proposals: 10 January 2016.   See more at http://italianartsociety.org/grants-opportunities/ias-research-and-publication-grants/

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Funding and scholarships Jobs

Research Fellowship: École française de Rome (Rome 2015)

Research Fellowship
École française de Rome (Rome 2015)
Deadline: 4 November 2014

IMGFarneseGdeSalleLes Écoles françaises à l’étranger ont mis en place depuis la rentrée 2012 le statut de chercheurs résidents dans leurs établissements. À l’École française de Rome (EFR), ce titre est accordé à des enseignants-chercheurs, des chercheurs statutaires ou des post-doctorants sous contrat qui sont accueillis pour une durée de six mois renouvelable, pour contribuer à la réalisation d’un programme scientifique en collaboration avec l’EFR. L’accueil est réglé par convention entre l’EFR et l’organisme de rattachement de ces chercheurs. L’École met à leur disposition tous ses moyens matériels et scientifiques pour faciliter la réalisation de leur programme.

Une aide pour favoriser leur séjour hors de leur résidence peut en outre être proposée par l’EFR lorsque le programme ne bénéficie pas de financements extérieurs propres : pour ceux qui se logent par eux-mêmes dans Rome, une aide de 2000€ mensuels est octroyée ; pour ceux qui sont logés dans l’immeuble de la Piazza Navona, l’aide mensuelle est de 1200€ sur lesquels est effectué un prélèvement de 600€  pour le loyer du studio (chambre-cuisine-salle d’eau) ; pour tous, remboursement d’un voyage par semestre vers leur résidence principale, sur la base du tarif économique.

L’EFR propose pour 2015, sans préjuger d’autres demandes susceptibles d’être prises en compte sans aide financière, un total de 30 mois d’aide à la mobilité. Une attention particulière sera portée aux dossiers s’inscrivant dans les champs disciplinaires relevant des Sciences Sociales.

Les dossiers, comportant un bref CV avec bibliographie sélective, une lettre de motivation précisant la période de séjour sollicitée, une copie du contrat ou de l’arrêté de nomination dans l’institution d’appartenance ainsi qu’une autorisation de séjour à Rome émanant de cette même institution, peuvent être envoyés, par mail, au secrétariat du directeur des études concerné par le programme de recherches dans lequel s’insère la mobilité, dans les délais suivants : au plus tard le 4novembre 2014 pour les dossiers sollicitant une aide financière ; au fil de l’eau pour les autres dossiers.Les chercheurs sollicitant une aide à la mobilité seront informés de l’issue de leur demande au plus tard le 25 novembre 2014.

For further information, see: www.ecole-francaise.it
Source: http://blog.apahau.org/

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SMFS Foremother’s Graduate Student Prize 2015

SMFS Foremother’s Graduate Student Prize 2015
Deadline: 1 January 2015

smfs_logo
The Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship is now accepting applications for the 2015 Foremother’s Prize for Graduate Students.
Funded through the generous gift of royalties from the editors and authors of the Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe (Judith Bennett and Ruth Mazzo Karras, eds.), the grant provides $2,000 for a graduate student to undertake a significant professional development initiative. The winner will be partnered with a senior medieval feminist scholar whose guidance and association can assist her in developing and executing the project.

Such projects might include:

  • Travel to a conference relevant to medieval feminist scholarship, for instance, the annual Gender and Medieval Studies Conference in the U.K.
  • Travel to visit archives, research libraries, museums, manuscript collections, or archeological or architectural sites
  • Travel to conduct other forms of on-site research
  • Development of a digital humanities project related to feminist research
  • Organizing of a medieval feminist conference or colloquium
  • Travel to allow sustained work with a mentor

SMFS is especially interested in assisting students whose projects are not otherwise funded. The winner must be willing to write a reflective report describing the outcome of the project that will appear on the SMFS public website.Applicants should provide: a completed application form (to include existing funding sources and advisor signature), a 500-word description of the project including its scope and development, proposed timeline, and a potential budget.Application Deadline: January 1, 2015
The winner will be announced by February 15, 2015.For full instructions on how to apply, please visit: http://smfsweb.org/smfs-2015-foremothers-prize

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Emmanuel College Research Fellowships 2015 (University of Cambridge)

Research Fellowship
Emmanuel College Research Fellowships 2015
University of Cambridge
Deadline: 2 October 2014

The Governing Body of Emmanuel College invites applications for three stipendiary Research Fellowships in any subject; all three Fellowships are for a three-year fixed term, and will commence on 1 October, 2015.

Cmglee_Cambridge_Emmanuel_College_Front_CourtApplications will be accepted from any graduate of a university within or outside the United Kingdom. Eligibility is restricted to those for whom the Research Fellowship would be their first substantial paid academic or research appointment (other than as a doctoral student).

These Fellowships are intended for outstanding researchers early in their careers: successful candidates are likely to be in the latter stages of their research leading to a PhD degree, or post-doctoral researchers who have been awarded their PhD degree after 1 October, 2013. Candidates should note that these Fellowships are extremely competitive.

For details and to apply please see http://resfell.emma.cam.ac.uk/rf_2015

Applications must be submitted online and received by 17:00 BST on Thursday 2nd October, 2014. Incomplete or late applications will NOT be accepted after this date.

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Fellowship: Pre- or postdoc fellowships at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence

Fellowship: Pre- or postdoc fellowships 
The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz
Application deadline: 15 August 2014

The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max Planck Institut is pleased to place a call for applications to pursue studies in Art History within the independent Max Planck Research Group (MPRG) “Objects in the Contact Zone – The Cross-Cultural Lives of Things”, directed by Eva-Maria Troelenberg.

– 1-2 pre- or postdoc fellowships for up to 6 months, beginning approximately 1 October 2014 
– 1 student assistant position (BA or MA level, 80h/month) for October – December 2014

KHIThe research group seeks to adapt the notion of the “contact zone” as a key term, connecting it to the object: non-European objects which are shown and stored in Western museums or collections, reproduced in Western media or are regarded, described, analyzed and categorised through a Western lens – such objects are situated in a contact zone. This follows approaches of cultural anthropology, while maintaining genuinely art historical solutions as the investigative aim. As such, these contact zones create particular conditions of perception and reception, resulting both from the object’s own aura, provenance, or biography and from the recipient’s predisposition and intentions.

Following a potentially asymmetric, but basically reciprocal or polycentric working hypothesis of transculturation, we are looking at case studies which can shed significant light on the production of knowledge in such contact zones.

Our examples deal with the interrelation between particular objects or groups of objects and their cross-cultural reception as mediated through museums, collections, publications or other visual or performative cultural practices in the colonial and postcolonial age. We are mainly focusing on exchange processes within the larger modern Mediterranean and its global connections.

Together, our case studies can bridge the theoretical space between cross-cultural studies and visual culture phenomena and may also induce critical reassessments of established narratives, categories and key terms such as the very idea of “transculturation” itself. As our work is embedded into questions of institutional history as well as into the history of science, knowledge and representation, our overarching research queries have developed significantly towards fields such as:

– museum theory and exhibitions in cross-cultural context
– agency theories for polycentric and transcultural art histories
– political and social functions of aesthetic differences and convergences
– critical approaches to canon and chronology in art history

For further information on the MPRG see also
http://www.khi.fi.it/en/forschung/projekte/projekte/projekt179/index.html

Fellowship applications in German or English language should include 

– detailed CV
– research proposal (max. 4 pages)
– list of publications and one substantial writing sample
– one letter of recommendation

Student assistant applications should include

– letter of motivation
– CV
– one letter of recommendation
– certificate of matriculation

Please send your electronic application in one pdf file (max. 2 MB) by 15 August to troelenberg@khi.fi.it.

The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz is an equal opportunity employer and particularly encourages applications from women and disabled persons. Fellowships follow the rules of the Max Planck Society.