Call for Submissions: Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies

The Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies (JMIS) is a leading interdisciplinary journal for innovative scholarship on the multiple languages, cultures, and historical processes of the Iberian Peninsula, and the zones with which it was in contact. We encourage submission of all innovative scholarship of interest to the community of medievalists and Iberianists, and welcome informal inquiries.

JMIS, which aims to bring theoretically informed approaches into creative contact with more empirically minded scholarship, encompasses archaeology, art and architecture, music, philosophy and religious studies, as well as history, codicology, manuscript studies and the multiple Arabic, Latin, Romance, and Hebrew linguistic and literary traditions of Iberia. We welcome work that engages peninsular Iberia in relation to other parts of the medieval world addressing links of with the Maghreb, Iberia’s presence in the Mediterranean, or adopting an Atlantic frame. 

Why publish in Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies?

  • Make a significant impact. JMIS is a well-established and highly respected journal.
  • Grow your readership. The journal has wide international readership.
  • Raise your profile in your field. Essays published in JMIS are indexed in Humanities Index; International Humanities Index; Scopus, Arts and Humanities Citation Index®; Current Contents®/Arts & Humanities.
  • Broaden your reach. Interdisciplinary in scope, JMIS engages with cutting-edge debates in multiple scholarly fields.

More information here.

Published by Roisin Astell

Roisin Astell received a First Class Honours in History of Art at the University of York (2014), under the supervision of Dr Emanuele Lugli. After spending a year learning French in Paris, Roisin then completed an MSt. in Medieval Studies at the University of Oxford (2016), where she was supervised by Professor Gervase Rosser and Professor Martin Kauffmann. In 2017, Roisin was awarded a CHASE AHRC studentship as a doctoral candidate at the University of Kent’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, under the supervision of Dr Emily Guerry.

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