Tag Archives: jews

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-charlatanesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com

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Conference Programme: Minority Influences in Medieval Society, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, November 25-26, 2016

tumblr_mpkos7mo2o1ssmm02o1_1280Conference Programme: Minority Influences in Medieval Society, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, November 25-26, 2016.

Friday 25 November

9.45 Welcome (Nora Berend)

Session 1. 10-11.15

Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg) Influences of mudejar spirituality on majority Christian religious life

Teresa Shawcross (Princeton) Ethno-religious Minorities and the Shaping of Byzantine Society during the Crusades

COFFEE

Session 2. 11.30-12.45

Annette Kehnel (Mannheim) Minority language, minority culture, minority tradition: Who exactly cares?

Amira Bennison (Cambridge) The Berber imprint on the medieval Maghrib

LUNCH

Session 3.  14.15-15.30

Ana Echevarría (Madrid) Reinventing law codes under foreign conditions: influence, adaptation or endurance in the Iberian peninsula

Eduard Mühle (Münster)  Real and perceived influence of minority groups in medieval Poland (12th-13th c)

COFFEE

Session 4. 16-18 Eva Haverkamp (München) Jews in the high medieval economy: how to evaluate their role

István Petrovics (Szeged) The Role of “Latin”  Guests in the Economic Life and Urban Development of Medieval Hungary

James Barrett (Cambridge) Northern Peoples and Medieval European Trade: Locating Agency

 

Saturday 26 November

Session 1. 9.30-10.45

Przemysław Wiszewski (Wrocław) Cultural turn in 12th-14th c. Silesia: how the German-speaking minority became the cultural majority

Luciano Gallinari (Cagliari) Catalans in Sardinia and the transformation of Sardinians into a political minority

COFFEE

Session 2. 11.15-12.30

Matthias Hardt (Leipzig) Western immigrants in High Medieval Bohemia

Katalin Szende (Budapest) Iure Theutonico? German settlers, local rulers, and legal frameworks for immigration to medieval East Central Europe  LUNCH

Supported by the DAAD Cambridge Research Hub with funds from the German
Federal Foreign Office (FFO)

How to register: To register for the conference, please email Dr Nora Berend, nb213@cam.ac.uk and send a cheque for £ 7 (or the appropriate cost for one day; an optional charge for lunch can also be added, see below) to her to St Catharine’s College, Cambridge CB2 1RL. Cheques must be made payable to St Catharine’s College. Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Registration is £4 for Friday and £3 for Saturday; this is to cover the cost of refreshments during the day. Coffe, tea and biscuits will be available.

Lunch will ONLY be provided for those who order and pay £12 by 10 November, but it will be possible instead to leave during the lunch break to get some food in town.

 

Fellowship: Jews, Christians, and Muslims (Cambridge, 2015)

Fellowship: Jews, Christians. and Muslims
Woolf Institute Cambridge, 2015
Deadline: 24 January 2014

Woolf-InstituteThe Woolf Institute, which specialises in the study of relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims from a multidisciplinary perspective, invites applications for its annual visiting fellowship. The Fellowship is tenable for a two to three month period that overlaps one of the Cambridge terms 2015:

Lent term: 13 January–13 March 2015
Easter term: 21 April–12 June 2015

The successful candidate will be expected to be involved in a project of academic research, public education or of the arts in an area relevant to the Institute’s work. The Fellow will be asked to present their work at a symposium on the subject of their project proposal.

There is no stipend attached to the Fellowships, but Fellows will be entitled to free accommodation in Cambridge and round-trip travel from their country to Cambridge. They will also have access to the Woolf Institute and Cambridge University libraries.

The Fellowship is available for a postdoctoral scholar of any academic rank, a policymaker or analyst in a relevant area of work, or an artist (writer, painter, photographer, etc.) and will most likely be asked to participate in some of the Institute’s teaching or practice-based activities. Further information about the Institute can be found at: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk

A letter of application, CV, the names of two referees who may be approached, a project proposal (1,500 words max.), and a sample of work should be sent to:

Electors of the Visiting Fellowship, Woolf Institute, Wesley House, Jesus Lane, Cambridge CB5 8BJ, UK or e-mailed to Tina Steiner at bs411@cam.ac.uk.

Questions may be addressed informally to the Deputy Director, Dr Shana Cohen at sc736@cam.ac.uk