Tag Archives: Agency

CFP: Female Agency in the Arts (New York, 26-27 Jun 2018)

Christie’s Education New York, June 26 – 27, 2018
Deadline: Jul 15, 2017

Celebrating Female Agency in the Arts
Call for Sessions

Busy road intersection in Manhattan, New York, at sunset

Christie’s Education

Following the success of the 250-anniversary conference held in London
in July 2016, Christie’s Education is organizing its second academic
conference on the theme of women in the arts. The Conference will take
place at Christie’s, 20 Rockefeller Plaza in New York on Tuesday June
26th and Wednesday June 27th 2018.

From Antiquity to today, women have always played a significant role in
the arts and their markets.  With this call for sessions, we welcome
proposals coming from a wide range of disciplines that would consider
women’s diverse contributions to the arts from a transnational and
transhistorical perspective. We hope that the sessions will reflect the
global and historical diversity of the issues at stake.

This conference is not advocating for a separate history nor an
alternative history of art and its markets, but rather we want to look
at the central role played by women in the creation, development,
support and preservation of the arts and, also how their contribution
has changed over time.

Sessions should consider globally and throughout history women as
artists, patrons and collectors of art and architecture, dealers and
brokers, art historians and art critics as well as curators and
preservers of culture. From the presence of women in emerging and
established art centers to historical aristocratic patronage and back
in time to the medieval period and antiquity we hope that the sessions
will investigate a diverse range of topics.

Deadline for Session Proposals:
We encourage academics across disciplines and art professionals to
submit proposals for individual sessions. Sessions will be 115 (4 x 20
minute papers) or 90 minutes (3 x 20 minute papers) in length. Please
send a 250/300-word abstract to Dr. Cecily Hennessy
(chennessy@christies.com) and Dr. Véronique Chagnon-Burke
(vchagnon-burke@christies.edu) by July 15th 2017.

CFP: Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, @IMC 2017, Leeds, July 3-6

haremason3Call for Papers: Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, International Medieval Congress at University of Leeds (IMC 2017), July 3-6, 2017
Deadline: September 12, 2016

Paper Panel sponsored by the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)

Recent scholarship has drawn attention to the significant roles played by medieval women as patrons of architecture and to the ways in which gender informed the design and function of architectural sites. But what about representations of women and architecture in the medieval imagination? How do visual materials such as manuscript illuminations, paintings and tapestries, and literary works, such as dream visions, conceptualize the relationship between women and architectural space? To what degree are gender and architecture mutually constituted? What conclusions can we draw about spaces considered feminine, and how do these spaces renegotiate the divisions between private and public? Given the longstanding associations between the female body and enclosure, what is the relationship between gender roles and real or imagined enclosures? In what ways do gendered imagined spaces help reconceive real spaces, or vice versa?

Though all topics will be considered, we are particularly eager for papers that address female identity and agency as figured through architectural forms.

How to submit: Please send your name and affiliation, a paper title and abstract (200-250 words) to Boyda Johnstone (bjohnstone1@fordham.edu) & Alexandra Verini (averini@ucla.edu) by Sept. 12, 2016.

Call for Papers: Seals and Status 800 – 1700 (British Museum 4-6 Dec 2015)

Silver seal matrix set with a red jasper Roman intaglio showing the emperor Antoninus Pius. Acquired with the assistance of Dr. John H. Rassweiler.

Silver seal matrix set with a red jasper Roman intaglio showing the emperor Antoninus Pius. Acquired with the assistance of Dr. John H. Rassweiler.

Quo asserente se sigillum habere, subridens vir illustris, ‘Moris’, inquit, ‘antiquitus non erat quemlibet militulum sigillum habere, quod regibus et precipuis tantum competit personis…’

He answered that he had a seal. The great man smiled. ‘It was not the custom in the past’, he said, ‘for every petty knight to have a seal. They are appropriate for kings and great men only’.

Chronicle of Battle Abbey, 1180s or 1190s, ed. and trans. Eleanor Searle (1980)

 

The aim of this conference is to foster discussions about seals and status, concentrating on three principal themes:
I. Seals and social status
II. Seals and institutional status
III. The status of seals as objects
The famous exchange quoted on the left captures in a few biting words the close and significant connections between seals and status. It evokes the perception that sealing related to social status, that this relationship changed over time, and that such historical developments were both recognized and highly charged. Finally—and perhaps one reason why the Battle anecdote has been so often quoted—these words suggest an important status for seals themselves within the medieval world of objects. If anything, this importance increased with their proliferation: seals eventually belonged to all kinds of people and institutions, and many individuals, corporations, and chanceries had several. Ultimately, seals’ forms and functions came both to articulate and to construct social as well as institutional and administrative hierarchies.
Possible topics for papers include: Seals and heraldry; seals and inequality; seals and villeinage; seals of institutional office; seals and gender; non-heraldic personal seals; seals and status as represented in medieval and early modern texts; corporate seals and the status of institutions; the historiography of seals; the organization of chanceries; the development of sealing practices within and across social groups; relationships of seals to other works of art.
Proposals are welcomed from a wide range of perspectives, such as: archaeology, history, art history, archival studies, literature. Submissions will be accepted in English, French, and German and should be no more than 300 words in length. Send to Lloyd de Beer (ldebeer@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk) by 30th January 2015.
The conference will be held at the British Museum from the 4th – 6th December 2015.
This conference is co-organised with John Cherry and Jessica Berenbeim in collaboration with Sigillvm, a network for the study of medieval European seals and sealing practices.

Call for papers: Between Heaven and Earth: Ecclesiastical Patronage in Europe, 1400-1600 (Courtauld Institute of Art, 9 May 2015)

Scenes from the Life of a Bishop, panel 1. Before c. 1520. Master of the von Groote Adoration © The Courtauld Institute of Art

Scenes from the Life of a Bishop, panel 1. Before c. 1520. Master of the von Groote Adoration © The Courtauld Institute of Art

Deadline for CFP, 2 February 2015

Third Annual Renaissance Symposium at the Courtauld Institute of Art

In recent years, the artistic commissions of ecclesiastic and lay patrons – both individual and collective – have been a fruitful area of scholarship. Research addressing issues of sacred space, devotional practice, and the materiality of extant objects has generated new insights into the artistic provisions made for patronal commemoration and salvation. Often, however, the interests of lay and ecclesiastical patrons have been considered separately, with a lesser focus on how the differences in their status mediated a shared pursuit of commemoration in death. Clerical patronage of art in Renaissance Europe allowed for an expression of political identity and dynastic power during life, but how did their status and role in society affect their choices for the afterlife? Were ecclesiastical patrons more acutely aware of a pressing need to make provision for their personal salvation than their lay counterparts? If so, was this reflected when commissioning commemorative or devotional art? Was the desire to secure a wider intercessory audience expressed more consciously or emphatically in the art of the clergy?

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which ecclesiastical patrons utilised devotional and commemorative art. Was there a dialogue between their individual selves and the institutions in which they chose to locate their foundations? Crucially, how do these foundations comment on ecclesiastical life and afterlife? By examining a category of patrons that was highly aware of devotional and commemorative practice, this conference seeks to gain a better understanding of art commissioned for churches by those appointed to participate in and lead them.
We welcome proposals, exploring material across the stated time span, throughout Europe. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • A re-assessment of the recent historiography and scholarship concerning patronage in an ecclesiastical environment, especially when this contrasts with contemporary lay patronage.
  • The relationship between patron and artist or patron and religious institution. 
  • Depiction of ecclesiastical donor and votive figures.
  • The implications of patronal choices of saints and iconography for the intended audience.
  • The role of inscriptions, signatures and heraldry in commemoration.
  • Reference to political stance and success in religious art.
  • Conceptions of heaven and the afterlife as expressed in art.
  • Ecclesiastical institutions prescribing limits to patrons and patronage.
  • Positioning of chapels and memorials in churches.
  • Rituals and liturgy of commemoration.
  • The impact of the Reformation and Counter Reformation on ecclesiastical patronage.

The Renaissance Symposium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities in the UK and abroad to present their research. Unfortunately, we cannot offer travel subsidies. Applicants from outside London are, therefore, encouraged to apply to other funding bodies for travel bursaries to attend the conference.

Abstracts for 15-20 minute papers, not exceeding 250 words, should be sent with a brief academic CV (100 words) to Lydia Hansell (lydia.hansell@courtauld.ac.uk) and Joost Joustra (joost.joustra@courtauld.ac.uk) no later than 2nd February 2015. Successful applicants will be notified by the 12th February 2015.

Organised by Lydia Hansell and Joost Joustra (The Courtauld Institute of Art)