Tag Archives: academia

CFP: ‘Same Old Things? Re-Telling the Italian Renaissance’, London, 3 May 19

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Marcello Maloberti, Trionfo dell’Aurora (2018), courtesy of the artist and Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan

Courtauld Institute of Art London, May 3, 2019

Deadline: Jan 28, 2019

Same Old Things? Re-Telling the Italian Renaissance

Even today, the history of art is largely dominated by narratives that are for the most part style-based. They tell a story that is teleological, ever-progressive, and structured around influential artistic centres. Within this framework, the role of individual objects shifts depending on how they fit into the broader narrative that they articulate visually. By focusing on the objects and their potential to fashion and dictate stories, a different narrative is likely to emerge.

This conference seeks to identify individual objects, or small sets of objects, which have the potential to destabilise canonical art-historical narratives of Italian art. We are not looking for an alternative Renaissance – instead, we want to ask whether a different story can be told for the same, old things. In the last few decades, art historians have reevaluated  the position of understudied works of works in an increasingly de-centred, non-linear history of art. Certain interpretative frameworks, such as queer or feminist approaches, that laudably seek to interrupt conventional readings of objects, have had modest consequences for their placement within a historical narrative, often because they seek to disrupt that narrative in the first place. Sometimes objects themselves show the insufficiency of traditional critical tools to do them justice. But seldom have newly-developed critical tools been used to renegotiate the historical framing of those objects that have long stood at the core of the Western canon.

Having long questioned the exceptionality granted Italian Renaissance art by the founding fathers of art history, academia has not yet modified radically the way we tell the story of the cornerstones of any Western museum. As a consequence, academic discourse has grown increasingly distant from museum spaces. On the whole, museums have not rejected the comforting principles of order inherent in traditional narratives, of which they are sometimes the unyielding outposts. Arguably, they also struggle to balance object-based displays with the disruption of narrative frameworks typical of recent academic discourse. As a result, celebratory, unwavering views of the Italian Renaissance have proved remarkably resilient among the general public.

Applicants are encouraged to shrug off the burden of prescribed narrative schemes; to use fresh critical tools to unravel celebrated artworks from the patchwork of narratives that stitch them together, at the same time as weaving them into new stories — stories that might be open-ended, interrogative, undetermined, and far distant from those previously told. Papers should be object-based, but not object-focused, in that their interpretation should not be confined to the inward-looking understanding of the object per se, but rather should look outwards towards their (potentially large) role in new narratives. The objects themselves should date to between the thirteenth to the early seventeenth century; they may be Italian or not, canonical or lesser-known.

Papers are sought from doctoral candidates, early career scholars and researchers. Preference will be given to candidates presenting unpublished material. Proposals of no more than 350 words should be submitted, together with a short C.V. to giulio.dalvit@courtauld.ac.uk and adriana.concin@courtauld.ac.uk by 5pm on Monday 28 January 2019. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. We hope to be able to provide subsidy for travel and accommodation. We particularly encourage candidates from the U.K. and Europe. Successful candidates will be notified by mid-February.

Re-post: ON RACE AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES

A must-read open letter by the Fellowship of Medievalists of Colour about current issues, race and medieval studies:
http://medievalistsofcolor.com/medievalists-of-color-/on-race-and-medieval-studies

Event: historyLab Plus – History within the Academy: Ask the Experts (London, 27 June 2014)

History within the Academy: Ask the Experts
Friday, 27 June 2014 from 09:15 to 13:30
London, Institute of Historical Research
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This half day workshop is organised jointly with the Royal Historical Society & History Lab Plus. The workshop is aimed at early career historians and anyone seeking an academic post in history. Those who have recently completed or are about to submit a PhD are particularly welcome.

The event will be informal, with plenty of time to ask questions and to meet the speakers. The discussion will focus on the academic job market, public engagement, open access and looking ahead to REF2020. There will also be chance to raise any other questions or concerns relating to building an academic career in History.

Registration is free but places are strictly limited. Early booking is required. http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/history-within-the-academy-ask-the-experts-tickets-11584755315

For further information, see:
Web: www.history.ac.uk/historylab
Email: ihrhistorylab@googlemail.com
Blog: http://the-history-lab.blogspot.com