Tag Archives: 15th Century

INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL, London

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow, 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

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Jessica Barker, ‘Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal’, 26 March 2019, QMUL

Maius image

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place on 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

Job: Lecturer/senior lecturer in art history c. 1400-1800

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Salary:  Competitive salary
Closing Date:  Wednesday 21 February 2018
Interview Date:  See advert
Reference:  189

The Courtauld Institute of Art is the UK’s leading institution for teaching and research in Art History and the conservation of paintings; it is also home to one of the finest small art museums in the world. The Art History department has an outstanding research and teaching record from Late Antiquity to the Contemporary with an increasingly global outlook, and embraces its diversity of theoretical approaches and methodologies.

The Courtauld wishes to appoint a full-time Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Art History, to begin on 1 September 2018. The successful candidate will complement the existing teaching strengths of the Department and will have a research focus in any region or period from c.1400-1800. We seek an art historian who situates their research in a wider, global context, and who shares a ‘decentred’ approach that avoids focus on only a single part of the world. An ideal candidate would be able to teach across at least one other field in a way directed by concepts of exchange and interaction, and to build bridges with other areas of art historical investigation. The candidate is expected to be able to situate their work in the theoretical and historiographical debates in their specialised research area and also engage with current issues in global Art History.

The appointee will research and publish to the highest quality and will actively pursue and apply for appropriate research grants; will provide inspiring teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels; and will play an active role in the life and administration of The Courtauld.

PAY: Grade 6 (£36,644 to £41,958) or Grade 7 (£43,117 to £49,461), depending on experience

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 21 February 2018, 23:59 GMT

INTERVIEW DATE: Interviews will be held in the week of 19 March 2018

Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400- 1600 (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium), The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28 April 2017

ghirlandaio20-20calling20of20the20apostles20detail-201481-20fresco-20sistine20chapel20vatican-31-600x600Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400 – 1600, (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium) Courtauld Institute of Art, London, April 28, 2017

In recent years, the analysis of social networks has generated a
fruitful field of scholarly enquiry. Research addressing the dynamics
that govern personal relationships within and without communities of
various kinds has permeated through historical, anthropological, and
sociological studies. These investigations have traced the ways in
which societies structured according to gender, family bonds, and
neighbourhood ties as well as political, professional, and religious
associations regulated social interaction. However, the role of art and
architecture in cultivating these interpersonal relationships has not
been explored comprehensively. Even art historical approaches have
frequently given preference to textual rather than visual evidence in
elucidating these social networks.

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which social
networks have been represented visually. Such an approach has great
potential to deepen the discussion surrounding the commission,
production, and reception of art and architecture between 1400 and 1600.

This conference is generously sponsored by the Sackler Research Forum,
Courtauld Institute of Art, the CHASE AHRC Doctoral Training
Partnership Cohort Development Fund, and the Society for Renaissance
Studies.

‘The Art of the Network’ is free and open to the public. Advanced
registration is strongly encouraged:
http://courtauld.ac.uk/event/the-art-of-the-network

PROGRAMME

9.00 – 9.30
Registration

9.30 – 9.45
Welcome: Alexander J. Noelle (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

9.45 – 11.10
Session 1: Materialising Allegiance
Chaired by Suzanne Duff (Brown University)

Ann Adams (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
Perpetual Membership: The Fifteenth-Century Tombs of the Knights of the
Order of the Golden Fleece

Sara Frier (Yale University)
So sah ich als Soldat aus (‘This is how I looked as a soldier’): The
Mercenary-Artists of Renaissance Switzerland

Anna Merlini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A Journey through the Labyrinth of Symbols: Retracing a Social Network
across Achille Bocchi’s Symbolicae Quaestiones (1555)

Discussion

11.10 – 11.35
Tea / Coffee Break

11.35 – 13.00
Session 2: Civic Art
Chaired by Imogen Tedbury (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Maria Harvey (The University of Cambridge)
‘ + E?????? ????? ? ???????? ?[??] … ?[????] K??[??????]’: Art and
Community in Fifteenth-Century Salento

Saida Bondini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A History of Families: Networks of Private Patronage in Late
Fifteenth-Century Bologna

Maria Matarazzo (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
The Plinian Monuments in Como: Classical Antiquity as Municipal Identity

Discussion

13.00 – 14.00
Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.25
Session 3: Artist(ic) Identity
Chaired by Lydia Goodson (The Warburg Institute)

Elizabeth Bernick (John Hopkins University)
Mapping Cesare da Sesto: A Placeless Style

Wouter Wagemakers (University of Amsterdam)
Visualising Patterns of Patronage in Sixteenth-Century Verona: Michele
Sanmicheli and the Roman Connection

Luca Baroni (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
Urbino to Europe: Federico Barocci’s Artistic and Diplomatic Network as
Visualised in His Paintings

Discussion

15.25 – 15.50
Tea / Coffee Break

15.50 – 17.15
Session 4: Visualising Dynasties
Chaired by Bart van Eekelen (Utrecht University)

Anastazja Grudnicka (University College London)
The (Un)Making of the Habsburg Dynasty: Visual Representations of
Matthias Habsburg in the Dutch Provinces (1577-1581)

Rebekah Helen Lee (University of York)
By the Book: Dynastic and Corporal Network Building in the Arenberg
Family Portrait Album circa 1600

Marina Porri (Universities of Florence, Siena, and Pisa)
Marriage Portraits as Political Networking: The Medici Court at the End
of the Sixteenth Century

Discussion

17.15 – 17.30
Comfort Break

17.30 – 17.45
Closing Remarks: Alexander Röstel (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

17:45 – 18:45
Keynote Address
Prof. John Padgett (University of Chicago)
Networks in Renaissance Florence

18.45 – 20:00
Reception

Conference: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 28th June 2017 – 30th June 2017

238d-5c94-4eb4-bd92-3202Conference: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 28th June 2017 – 30th June 2017
Fees: Standard Registration Fee – £160.00; graduate Registration Fee – £120.00; dinner – £60.00
Register by June 21

After Chichele adopts an investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period.

 

CFP: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8Call for Papers: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)
Deadline: November 30, 2016

Issue 2018: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture,
1400-1700’

In his letter to Philippe de Lannoy, from 1578 (De ratione cum fructu
perigrinandi et preaesertim in Italia), Justus Lipsius summarized the
aims of traveling as: ‘utilitas’ and ‘voluptas’. Traveling, according
to Lipsius, would lead to spiritual enrichment, as it would bring one
into contact with different people, different lifestyles, and different
customs and morals. At the same time, it would increase knowledge about
other countries and places, and about history. More or less at the same
time appeared a growing number of guides and treatises on traveling
(artes apodemicae), meant to prepare travelers for their trip, giving
advice on how to deal with the various mores in different countries and
supplying ‘cultural’ information on topography, history, important
monuments and other attractions.

In this volume, we want to study the production of knowledge shaped by
the traveling guides and artes apodemicae, especially in their
interaction with the actual practices of traveling and acquiring
knowledge. What was the formative importance of (printed) guides and
travel literature for the practice of traveling? How decisive was the
information they supplied in directing the travelers’ interest and
attention, and in shaping their views and knowledge? Or, the other way
round, was the information offered in guides and art literature
specified and/or expanded, or did it acquire a different scope as a
result of increasing knowledge or ‘new’ fields of interest developed by
travelers? And in which ways did the literature on traveling affect
other areas of knowledge production, either established academic
disciplines or new fields of knowledge?

Topics to be addressed may include:
– The use of travel literature and (national or local) guides. As books
were often too heavy or expensive to carry around during a visit ‘on
the spot’, to what extent and in which way were they consulted
beforehand or afterwards? How did this use beforehand or afterwards
affect the visitors’ experience?
Travel literature and (national or local) guides in relation to travel
accounts. As travel reports were often written after the voyage had
been made, much of the information in them was based on consultation of
guides afterwards. What does that mean for the reliability of travel
accounts?
– What was the impact of the  target audience of (national or local)
guides? What differences can be discerned between guides written in
Latin (obviously for a learned public) and vernacular ones (or
vernacular versions)? To what extent was the kind of information
adapted (expanded, or cut down) to target a wider audience?
– What was the nature and scope of travel reports? Were they in the
first place  a listing of things done and visited or do they reflect
the ‘spiritual enrichment’ that travel theorists such as Lipsius were
writing about? What kind of travel accounts were published and what
kind remained in manuscript, and what does that say about their aim,
function and intended audience?
– How much of the information offered in (national or local) guides was
actually ‘new’? To a large extent, the various guides of a specific
city or region repeated each other. Were they regularly updated with
the inclusion of new monuments (recently finished buildings, modern
works of art, etc.) or with newly acquired information (dates and names
etc.)?
– To what extent have their listings of monuments shaped our present
canon of important art works and ‘not to be missed’ attractions? Are
monuments that were not included (e.g. because they were not (easily)
accessible) still being disregarded, even though they were/are of high
cultural or historical importance?
– The importance of other sources of information besides guides and
travel literature, such as (historical) writings by antique, medieval
and (near) contemporary authors, collections of inscriptions, prints
and book illustrations.

How to submit: Please submit a one-page abstract (ca. 300 words) and a short
curriculum vitae (max. two pages) to both editors, before December 1,
2016:

– Karl Enenkel, Medieval and Early Modern Latin Philology, Westfälische
Wilhelms-Universität, Münster: kenen_01@uni-muenster.de
and
– Jan L. de Jong, History of Early Modern Art, Rijksuniversiteit
Groningen: j.l.de.jong@rug.nl

Applicants will be notified before January 1, 2017. Depending funding,
a conference with all authors is planned to take place in Münster, in
November 2017. Final chapters are due by February 1, 2018.

CFP: ‘Autodidacts, Workshops, Academies – Architectural Education 1400 -1850,’ Sixth Colloquium on Architectural Theory at the Werner Oechslin Library, Einsiedeln, April 20 – 23, 2017

800px-geometria_deutsch_08Call for Papers: Autodidacts, Workshops, Academies – Architectural Education 1400 -185o, Sixth Colloquium on Architectural Theory at the Werner Oechslin Library, Werner Oechslin Library, Einsiedeln, April 20 – 23, 2017
Deadline: 5 October 2016

Before the establishment of the major schools of architecture in the
nineteenth century, there were various ways to become an architect,
each with different focuses. A canonical system did not exist. Studies
based on books or travel, apprenticeships in workshops and studios, a
training in the military or building administration, as well as
academic lessons could all be part of the education of a prospective
architect. A talent for drawing was always a prerequisite, as were the
economic possibilities of the surroundings. Aspiring to a secure
position in the military or administration motivated the young
candidates, and family connections and knowledge fostered their
development. Furthermore, beginning in the 17th century, textbooks were
published specifically for the needs of the students. This gradually
led to the consolidation of formats and didactic conditions for
training architects, including (teaching) collections that made
available illustrative material – similar to the artists’ training for
sculptors or painters.

Research to date has focused primarily on architectural training in the
art academies, yet beyond this, no overview considers the other
relevant domains. At this upcoming event, the numerous paths to
knowledge and the varied acquisition of competencies will be presented
and compared in individual studies and analyses. Relying closely on
historical sources, the contributions will enable us to form a general
outline of the topic.

The event addresses architectural theoreticians, architects, art
historians, historians of technology and science, and others, and seeks
to bring together leading experts on the topics as well as, in
particular, young researchers from various countries.

Papers should be limited to twenty-minute presentations.

Languages for paper proposals and presentations: German, English,
French, Italian.  At least a passive knowledge of German is expected of
all participants.

The Foundation assumes the hotel costs for course participants, as well
as for some group meals. Travel costs cannot be reimbursed.

How to Submit: Please send short paper proposals and CVs by e-mail to:
anja.buschow@bibliothek-oechslin.ch