CFP: [IN]MATERIALITY IN MEDIEVAL ART, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, November 12–13, 2020

1594-2020-01-11-cartel20congreso61CALL FOR PAPERS:
[IN]MATERIALITY IN MEDIEVAL ART
Universidad Complutense de Madrid, November 12 – 13, 2020

Deadline: Apr 3, 2020

Ovid’s aphorism «Materiam superabat opus», evoked throughout the Middle Ages and beyond, reveals the special consideration given to skill, technique and craft in the artistic creation processes. Thus, ingenuity and mastery have been privileged qualities in our approach to works of art, according to a restricted vision assumed by Art History as a discipline. However, both the aesthetic reflections and the documents related to artistic commissions in the Middle Ages show the great importance given to the material and sensory aspects of artefacts and monuments. In line with this perception, once again valued in light of the «material turn» of the discipline in the last decades, the 14th Jornadas Complutenses de Arte Medieval propose to focus on materiality as an essential factor in the artistic production, as well as on the poetics of immateriality and the intangible condition of the aesthetic experience.

Beyond the technical analyses, which in recent decades have allowed us to reconsider common places in the study of the medieval artistic production, this congress aims to establish transversal debates in order to open up new perspectives. In this sense, the material conditions of artistic production (properties, supply, cost, transport or technology, among others), as well as their reflection in the written sources –from technical treatises to documentary and literary references– will be discussed. On the other hand, the congress will address issues related to the sensorial features of the medieval works of art and their relationship with intangible aspects, such as the material and chromatic qualities, the incidence of light, the acoustic and olfactory effects, and the impact of the natural environment. The poetics of the materials, their meaningful uses, and the symbolic values of the immaterial will have room in the debates. Likewise, it will be of interest to consider new interpretative concepts, such as «transmateriality» and «transmediality», which may include the morphological transformation of elements across different materials, the transfer and circulation of ornamental patterns, or the physical traces of mental, invisible or transient phenomena. Contributions that address non-hegemonic and / or under-treated practices and media in historiography are especially welcomed.

Proposed topics include (but are not limited to):

– Material conditions of artistic creation.
– Underrated practices and media.
– Poetics and semantic uses of the material and the intangible.
– Cultural history of materials.
– Sensoriality and immateriality.
– «Transmateriality» and «transmediality».

Confirmed keynote speakers: Miquel Àngel Capellà Galmés (Universitat de les Illes Balears), Vincent Debiais (CRH – Centre national de la recherche scientifique), Beate Fricke (Universität Bern), Ruggero Longo (Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte), María Teresa López de Guereño Sanz (Universidad Autónona de Madrid), José Miguel Puerta Vílchez (Universidad de Granada), Laura Rodríguez Peinado (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Elisabetta Scirocco (Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte), Noelia Silva Santa-Cruz (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Ana Suárez González (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela), Jorge Tomás García (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid).

Call for papers:

Researchers interested in submitting a 20-minute paper on any of the topics listed above are invited to send their proposals in Spanish, English, French, Italian and Portuguese, including the following information:

– Title of the paper proposal.

– Name and surname of the author and email address.

– Abstract of about 500 words.

– Brief academic and research CV of about 300 words.

The proposals should be sent to the email address inmaterial@ucm.es by 3 April 2020. Authors will be notified of the outcome by 8 May 2020. Selected papers will be published later in a collective volume after peer review.

More info: https://www.ucm.es/historiadelarte/14thjornadasmedieval

Conference: ‘Church, Saints and Seals, 1150-1300’, Canterbury Christ Church University, 8 May 2020

As part of Becket 2020, this one-day conference combines presentations by experts on seals with a visit to the Cathedral Archives and Conservation Studio. Speakers will discuss the iconography of seals, including representations of sacred buildings and Becket’s murder, as well as the materiality of seals and sealing practices.

Timetable:

10.00-10.30            Registration and Refreshments

10.30-11.15            Welcome and Session One: Professor Markus Späth

11.15-12.00            Session Two: Dr Lloyd de Beer and Professor Sandy Heslop

12.00-13.00            Lunch

13.00-13.45           Session Three: Dr Philippa Hoskin

13.45-14.30           Session Four: Dr Paul Dryburgh

14.30-15.00            Refreshments

15.00-15.45            Session Five: short presentations and concluding remarks

16.00-17.00            Visit to Cathedral Archives and Conservation Studio

Tickets: Full price (including lunch) £50; CCCU and Kent University students (including lunch) £25

Tickets and more information here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-and-humanities/events/arts-and-humanities/ckhh/saints-and-seals.aspx

Postdoc: Postdoc in archaeology of the Mediterranean (200-1000 CE), University of Puget Sound, deadline: March 1, 2020

The University of Puget Sound invites applications for the Lora Bryning Redford Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Archaeology starting in Fall 2020. This is a nonrenewable one-year position.

Responsibilities:

The Redford Fellow will be expected to teach three undergraduate courses over the year: an introduction to archaeology (including archaeological methods) course in the fall and two more specialized courses in the spring, chosen in consultation with the faculty mentor.  The Fellow will also deliver a public lecture and serve as a campus resource for those interested in archaeology; this may include advising students, identifying summer excavations or field schools in which to participate, or finding graduate programs that meet students’ interests.  The Fellow will be assigned to an appropriate department (e.g. Art and Art History, Classics, History, Religious Studies, Sociology and Anthropology), where faculty will assist with professional development.

Qualifications:

We invite applications from scholars who have completed a Ph.D. in archaeology within the last three years. We seek a candidate who has expertise in the archaeology of the Mediterranean, broadly understood, from c. 200 to c. 1000 CE.  Specializations might include the late Roman world, Sassanian Empire, early Islamic civilization, Byzantine Empire, or early medieval western Europe.  Candidates with interests in cross-cultural encounters, gender roles, or religion are especially encouraged to apply.  Scholars who are able to make connections across disciplines and demonstrate the impact of archaeological work on a variety of fields in an undergraduate liberal arts setting are especially encouraged to apply.

Compensation and Benefits:

Rank: Post-Doctoral Fellow

The position offers a salary of $40,000 and comes with health and professional development benefits.  Puget Sound offers a generous benefits package. For more information, visit: http://www.pugetsound.edu/about/offices–services/human-resources/overview-of-university-benefit/.

About Puget Sound:

Puget Sound is a selective national liberal arts college in Tacoma, Washington, drawing 2,600 students from 48 states and 20 countries. Puget Sound graduates include Rhodes and Fulbright scholars, notables in the arts and culture, entrepreneurs and elected officials, and leaders in business and finance locally and throughout the world. A low student-faculty ratio provides Puget Sound students with personal attention from faculty who have a strong commitment to teaching and offer 1,200 courses each year in more than 50 traditional and interdisciplinary fields. Puget Sound is the only nationally ranked independent undergraduate liberal arts college in Western Washington, and one of just five independent colleges in the Pacific Northwest granted a charter by Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s most prestigious academic honorary society. Visit “About Puget Sound” (http://www.pugetsound.edu/about) to learn more about the college.

Application Deadline: Interested individuals are encouraged to submit application materials no later than March 1, 2020 to ensure consideration.  

Required Documents:

Please submit curriculum vitae (CV) when prompted to submit resume. Additional documents can be attached within the application. Applications submitted without the documents requested below will not be considered:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Letter of Interest
  • Diversity Statement (see prompt below)
  • Three (3) letters of reference. You will be asked to specify the email addresses of reference providers at the time of application and the system will email these providers on the next business day.

Commitment to Diversity: As a department and university, we are strongly committed to creating an inclusive and effective teaching, learning, and working environment for all. We ask applicants to submit a diversity statement, in which they comment on their ability to contribute meaningfully to our on-going commitment to be informed and competent with regard to issues of diversity, equity, and individual differences. We encourage applicants to reference the University of Puget Sound’s current Diversity Strategic Plan (DSP) at http://www.pugetsound.edu/about/diversity-at-puget-sound/diversity-strategic-plan/ prior to writing this statement. While not an exhaustive list, the following are some ways candidates can express their qualification:

  • Your lived experiences and/or identities that speak to the department and university’s commitment to inclusion and diversity;
  • Demonstration of your awareness of inequities for underrepresented student populations in education, research experience, and other opportunities;
  • Brief insights on why diversity is important at institutions like the University of Puget Sound;
  • Infusion of diversity and diversity-related issues into your research, pedagogy, and/or service;
  • Previous and/or current activities involving mentoring underrepresented student populations;
  • Creative ideas or strategies you could enact as a member of the University of Puget Sound campus community to support the university’s DSP;
  • Brief insights on how cultural competency increases one’s effectiveness as an educator and department/university colleague.

University Diversity Statement

  • We acknowledge the richness of commonalities and differences we share as a university community; the intrinsic worth of all who work and study here; that education is enhanced by investigation of and reflection upon multiple perspectives.
  • We aspire to create respect for and appreciation of all persons as a key characteristic of our campus community; to increase the diversity of all parts of our University community through commitment to diversity in our recruitment and retention efforts; to foster a spirit of openness to active engagement among all members of our campus community.
  • We act to achieve an environment that welcomes and supports diversity; to ensure full educational opportunity for all who teach and learn here; to prepare effectively citizen-leaders for a pluralistic world.

Puget Sound is committed to an environment that welcomes and supports diversity. We seek diversity of identity, thought, perspective, and background in our students, faculty, and staff. To learn more please visit: http://www.pugetsound.edu/about/diversity-at-puget-sound/

All offers of employment are contingent on successful completion of a background inquiry.

The University of Puget Sound is an equal opportunity employer.

Conference: ‘The Intercultural Roots of Early Scholasticism’, 23-24 January 2020

The Intercultural Roots Early Scholasticism: Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Latin

23-24 January 2020, Goodenough College, Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB

 

 Please register here:  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-intercultural-roots-early-scholasticism-greek-hebrew-arabic-latin-tickets-80013698125

Please book lunch separately here: https://estore.kcl.ac.uk/product-catalogue/academic-faculties/faculty-of-arts-humanities/theology-religious-studies/lunch-for-the-intercultural-roots-of-early-scholasticism-conference

 

The late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries represent a dynamic period in Western intellectual history. These were years, before Aristotle’s works were fully digested, during which philosophical works written in Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic were becoming available in Latin for the first time, skewing understanding of Aristotle considerably and introducing themes into Latin thought in their own right. The proposed workshop seeks to better understand the phenomenon of the confluence of Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic sources that influenced early scholastic interpretations of Aristotle as well as Latin authorities like Augustine by investigating more closely those sources and the phenomenon of their transmission into Latin. In this connection, papers will be offered on various aspects of the Greek/Arabic/Hebrew tradition that had an influence on early scholastic thought particularly in the late twelfth and first half of the thirteenth century.

 

Speakers

  • Amos Bertolacci (Lucca)
  • Charles Burnett (The Warburg Institute)
  • Alexander Fidora (ICREA—Barcelona)/ Nicola Polloni (Berlin)
  • Dag Hasse (Würzburg)
  • John Marenbon (Trinity College, Cambridge)
  • Lydia Schumacher (King’s College London)
  • Lesley Smith (Oxford)
  • Anna-Katharina Strohschneider (King’s College London)
  • Faith Wallis (McGill)

 

Provisional Schedule

Thursday 23 January

10:00-10:15     Welcome and Introduction

10:15-11:15     Paper 1: Charles Burnett (The Warburg Institute), ‘Arabic and Latin Summae’

11:15-11:45     Tea break

11:45-12:45     Paper 2: Dag Hasse (Würzburg), Translating Double Intentionality from Arabic into Latin

1:00-2:00         Lunch

2:00-3:00         Paper 3: Lesley Smith (Oxford), The Summa Halensis, William of Auvergne, Maimonides, and Avicenna

3:15-4:15         Paper 4: Faith Wallis (McGill), A Twelfth Century Physician Reflects on the Soul, the Spirits, and the Problems of Free Will

4:15-4:45         Tea break

4:45-5:45         Paper 5: José Meirinhos (Porto), Intellectus agens est triplex: Jean of la Rochelle and Petrus Hispanus Portugalensis

6:00-7:00         Opening Reception

Friday 24 January

10:00-10:15     Welcome and Introduction

10:15-11:15     Paper 6: Amos Bertolacci (Lucca), Averroist or Anti-Averroist? On Albert the Great’s Attitude towards Averroes in the Commentary on the Metaphysics

11:15-11:45     Tea break

11:45-12:45     Paper 7: Alexander Fidora (ICREA—Barcelona)/Nicola Polloni (Berlin), Dominicus Gundissalinus and the Reception of Arabic Philosophy in the 13th Century

1:00-2:00         Lunch

2:00-3:00         Paper 8: John Marenbon (Cambridge), The Intercultural Roots of Early Scholasticism: Towards a New Historiography

3:15-4:15         Paper 9: Anna-Katharina Strohschneider (King’s College London)

4:15-4:45         Tea break

4:45-5:45         Paper 10: Lydia Schumacher (King’s College London), Early Franciscan Psychology: A Milestone in the Reception of Islamic and Jewish Philosophy

Spring Term 2020: Murray Seminars on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck, London

3rd February 2020:
James Hall, ‘Embattled Exclusivity: the Aesthetics and Politics of Michelangelo’s Attack on Flemish Painting’.

In a dialogue composed by Francisco de Holanda, Michelangelo launches a diatribe against painting produced in Europe north of the Alps, attacking what he sees as its crowdedness and materialism; its lack of order and discrimination; its sentimentality and its popularity with the ignorant and especially with women. This talk explores Michelangelo’s disparagement of Flemish painting within its rich cultural and political context. His antipathy draws on a historic association between those who lived north of the Alps with the Goths and Vandals who destroyed ancient Rome. Their modern mercenary descendants were still invading Italy, and their artforms – musical as well as visual – had done so too. However, Michelangelo’s main concern was less with Flemish art, than with the fact that it was so influential on Italian artists, including Michelangelo himself. To make matters worse, he was working in the Sistine Chapel, filled with supreme products of Flemish culture, and things were not going well.
25th February 2020:  
Federico Botana, ‘A gift for Giuliano di Lorenzo de’ Medici? The Aritmetica by Filippo Calandri’ 
The Aritmetica (Florence, Biblioteca Riccardiana, MS 2669, c. 1485) is one of the most lavish libri d’abbaco (mathematical treatises) that has come down to us from Renaissance Florence. The Aritmetica is illustrated with sixty-five miniatures, many consisting of lively scenes relating to trade, crafts and games. It has been thought that the manuscript was created for Lorenzo di Piero de’ Medici. The evidence that will be presented in this seminar, however, strongly suggests that a member of the Dell’Antella family commissioned the manuscript, and that it was later given to Lorenzo for use by his son Giuliano, the future Duke of Nemours.  In addition to presenting evidence on the original ownership of the manuscript, the paper discusses the contents and readership of libri d’abbaco, and the personality and intellect of Giuliano de’ Medici, which at a young age made him a worthy recipient for such a gift.

 

16th March 2020:  

Sarah Ferrari ‘Provenance matters: acquisitions of Venetian Renaissance art in Northern Europe between the First and the Second World War’.

 

This paper sheds new light on the dynamics of the European art market by investigating a group of paintings that were acquired by the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, Sweden, between 1917 and 1954. The group includes works attributed to Titian, Tintoretto, Schiavone and Veronese, some of which were once part of the celebrated collection of Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689). The paper offers an account of both documentary sources and material aspects, in order to identify the network of collectors and dealers involved, while at the same time analyzing the role of national identity as a driving force in the context of these acquisitions.
Information:
Seminars take place at 5pm in the History of Art Department (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in The Keynes Library (Room 114), unless stated otherwise.
Talks finish by 5.50pm to allow those with other commitments to leave, and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.
These talks are supported by the Murray Bequest in memory of the Department’s founder Peter Murray, and are open to all.

Conference: ”Our Aelred’: Friendship, Leadership and Sainthood at Rievaulx Abbey’, 3-4th July 2020

Join English Heritage at this major conference focused on Aelred, abbot of Rievaulx between 1147 and 1167.

Called ‘our Aelred’ by his monks, the abbot was one of the most important monastic leaders of the Middle Ages and remains an inspirational figure to this day.

Bringing together leading academics and heritage professionals, this conference provides a unique opportunity to examine Aelred’s impact on the architectural development of Rievaulx, his role in the Cistercian settlement of northern England and his activities as an author. Speakers will address the abbot’s impact in the wider monastic world and Aelred’s legacy, including his veneration as a saint and how his extraordinary life and achievements can be interpreted for 21st-century visitors to Rievaulx.

The event also features a round-table discussion focused on debates about Aelred’s sexuality.

The international panel of speakers includes Professor Janet Burton, Dr Michael Carter, Professor Marsha Dutton, Professor Peter Fergusson, Dr Elizabeth Freeman, Dr Alexandra Gajewski, Professor Brian Golding, Dr Katherine Harvey and Professor Emilia Jamroziak.

The registration fee includes entry to all the conference sessions, an evening drinks reception on 3 July and refreshments and lunch on 4 July.

The conference is timed to coincide with the Leeds International Medieval Conference (6-9 July), registration for which is separate.

A full programme will be available in early spring 2020.

Tickets and more information here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/our-aelred-friendship-leadership-and-sainthood-at-rievaulx-abbey-tickets-90598335059

CFP: Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28–29 May 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS – deadline tomorrow

 

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France and the Low Countries, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference will reconsider the dynamics of artistic influence in late medieval Iberia, and place European exchanges in a global context, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, it seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and issues of migration and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.

The theme of ‘travellers’—artists who reached or departed the region, at times more than once in their lives, but also objects and concepts imported and exported—will expand and inflect traditional narratives of late medieval and Renaissance art, underscoring the complexity of global interactions and exchanges which connected the Iberian peninsula to Europe and beyond. Bringing together international scholars working on Iberia and a range of related geographies, the conference seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to expand the field of analysis beyond Europe to encompass relationships with newly acquired dominions, from Madeira to Santo Domingo.

Topics for papers may include, but are not limited to:

  • Iberian artists employed abroad, from the master mason Guillelm Sagrera in Naples, to the sculptor Juan de la Huerta at the Chartreuse de Champmol
  • The close imitation of northern artists in such works as the Portuguese copies of Quentin Metsys’s The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes (early 16th century, Museu de Setúbal / Convento de Jesus, Portugal)
  • ‘Iberian’ objects produced elsewhere, for example Christian ivory carvings made in Goa or Kongo, Afro-Portuguese spoons, and Mexican ‘feather-work’ adopting the vocabulary of northern European late Gothic painting
  • Works made for a non-Iberian audience but purchased and displayed by local patrons.

By encouraging conversations across such seemingly disparate topics and geographies, the conference aims to position the Iberian artistic landscape within the networks of artistic exchange that spanned the medieval and Renaissance worlds, challenging the significance of 1492 as a moment of rupture between the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods.

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words together with a short CV and 100-word biography to Costanza.Beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and Sylvia.Alvares-Correa@history.ox.ac.uk by Friday 10 January 2020.

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Successful candidates will be notified by 17 February. In the first instance, applicants are encouraged to apply to their home institution for travel and accommodation funding. The organisers hope to provide financial support for travel and accommodation to speakers who require it. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.

Please click here for more information.