Call for Applications: French Summer School Of Byzantine Studies, 30 August-5 September 2017, Bucharest – DEADLINE TODAY

Deadline: 9 August
The Faculty of History of the University of Bucharest, the Centre Régional Francophone de Recherches Avancées en Sciences Humaines et Sociales de Bucarest (CEREFREA–Villa Noël), and the Research Institute of the University of Bucharest, with the financial support of the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie and the scientific coordination of Professor Paolo Odorico (CéSor, EHESS, Paris), have organized a summer school of Byzantine studies on the topic STUDYING THE BYZANTINE WORLD. METHODOLOGIES AND INTERPRETATIONS to be held in Bucharest, from the 30th of August to the 5th of September 2017.
Those eligible: students enrolled in a master’s program, doctoral students,
postdocs and students enrolling in master’s or doctoral programs in 2017. The students must understand the two languages of the summer school (French / English). At the end of the course, certificates of participation will be issued to students, equivalent to 12 ECTS. To enable students to participate in the courses, the organizers launch a call for applications, providing:
•Free participation in the course and dinners (for maximum 30 students)
•Free accommodation in the CEREFREA–Villa Noël (for maximum 8
students)
•AUF offered a grant covering the travel expenses and accommodation for some foreign PhD students established in the countries of Central and Oriental Europe.
The selection of the students who benefit of these supports will be made on scientific and academic criteria.
How to apply:
• Covering letter
•Curriculum studiorum indicating clearly studies already completed, research activity and field of research
• Other documents the candidate considers useful in support of his application.
Email to be sent by applicants to byzantinologie@yahoo.com in the subject line: bourse d’études–Université d’été–Bucarest or Fellowship for Summer University in Bucharest.
The selected candidates will receive a notification on the 14th of August.

Call for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich

csm_05-03_Ptolemaeus_ce38187a3aCall for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich
Deadline: 1 October 2017

The project Ptolemaeus Arabus et Latinus (PAL) is dedicated to the edition and
study of the Arabic and Latin versions of Ptolemy’s astronomical and astrological texts
and related material. These include works by Ptolemy or attributed to him,
commentaries thereupon and other works that are of immediate relevance to
understanding Ptolemy’s heritage in the Middle Ages and the early modern period up
to 1700 A.D.
The project is hosted by the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich for a
period of 25 years from 2013 to 2037. It is supervised by Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus
Hasse (University of Würzburg) and carried out by five scholars, including two
research leaders, Dr. David Juste and Dr. Benno van Dalen, two post-doctoral
researchers and one doctoral student.
We welcome applications for visiting fellowships tenable in Munich for a period of one
to four months between 1 January and 30 November 2018. The next round of visiting
fellowships is planned for 2020.
-The fellowships amount to € 3100 per month for senior scholars (PhD degree
awarded before 1 January 2013), € 2600 per month for post-docs (PhD degree
awarded after 31 December 2012) and € 1300 per month for doctoral students. In
special cases an additional travel grant may be awarded to overseas applicants. The
fellowships are not liable to taxation in Germany and do not include health
insurance or social benefits.
-Fellows will be offered office facilities at the Bayerische Akademie der
Wissenschaften in Munich, together with the research team, and are expected to
work in Munich most of the time. Fellows will be given access to the research
facilities of the project, including the project’s collection of manuscript
reproductions, and to the research libraries in Munich.
-Fellows are expected to do research in an area relevant to the project and to share
their experience and insights with the other members of the research team.
Research proposals to deal with Ptolemaic sources in languages other than Arabic
and Latin (especially Greek, Syriac, Hebrew and Persian) are also welcome.
-Applications should be sent in English to Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus Hasse by email (applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de) before 1 October 2017. Applications should include a complete CV with a list of publications and a research proposal of no more than 500 words. Applicants are asked to state in their research proposal the preferred duration of the fellowship (one, two, three or four months) and to propose a starting date.
Receipt of the application will be acknowledged and the outcome of all applications will be notified by email no later than 31 October 2017.
For further information, please visit our website http://ptolemaeus.badw.de. For
further enquiries, contact Dr. Claudia Dorl at applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de.

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)

CFP FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION: Architectural Representation in the European Middle Ages

ramsey censerCFP FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION: Architectural Representation in the European Middle Ages, edited by Hannah Bailey, Karl Kinsella, and Daniel Thomas

Deadline: 1 November 2017

The architectural remnants of the Middle Ages—from castles and cathedrals to village churches—provide many people’s first point of contact with the medieval period and its culture. Such concrete survivals provide a direct link to the material experience of medieval people. At the same time, exploring the ways in which architecture was conceptualized and depicted can contribute to our understanding of the ideological and imaginative worldview of the period.

This volume seeks to investigate all aspects of architectural representation in the medieval period, encompassing actual, symbolic, or imaginary architectural features, whether still standing today, observable in the archaeological record, or surviving only through depiction in literature or art. Topics of interest might include (but are not limited to) the social and symbolic value of architecture, architectural metaphor or imagery, architecture in visual representations, architecture in the depiction of other spaces, memory and architecture, and architectural style.

The volume is interdisciplinary in outlook and we welcome contributions from across the spectrum of academic disciplines, including literature, history, art, theology, and archaeology.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words, with a brief biographical blurb, to the editors at: architecturalrepresentations@gmail.com by 1st November, 2017.

CFP: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

CfP ICMA Kalamazoo 2018 Moving People Shifting FrontiersCall for Papers: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean, International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2018
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Organizers: Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artifacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

Exclusively Medieval, Online & Open Access: 2017 special issue of British Art Studies

The latest issue of British Art Studies (an open access, online Art History journal published by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art), is entirely devoted to Medieval Britain. The content is derived from a conference held at the British Museum in 2014: Invention and Imagination in British Art & Architecture, 600-1500.

It opens with an editorial by guest editors Sandy Heslop and Jessica Berenbeim, followed by twelve articles in traditional format: 

Thanks to the digital platform, it is possible to reference the articles to the nearest paragraph using the DOI link. The platform’s scope is further tested through the Conversation Piece and Handling Digital Objects portions of this special issue: 

Another innovative feature is a virtual simulation of the object sessions held at the 2014 conference. In actuality, these took the form of guided sessions with objects in the seminar rooms at the conference venue. In the journal, they are recreated via four interactive 3D models of objects, each accompanied by a short essay: