Gothic Revival, Medieval Art & the Hereford Screen

Issue 5 of British Art Studies features a One Object study of the Gothic Revival Hereford Screen. The 8 tonne metalwork structure was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and manufactured by the firm of Francis Skidmore in 1862. The collection of essays fosters discussion of the screen’s medieval models as well as its Victorian genesis.

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The Hereford Screen in Hereford Cathedral, view from North Transept, 19th century. (Image from the V&A website)

As a new and exclusively digital journal, British Art Studies’ virtual platform is celebrated through abundant interplay of text, image and audio-visual material.  It brings together seven scholars who present technical and theoretical perspectives on a single object by means of ‘traditional’ essays and short films.  This brief blog-post aims to draw attention to the medieval content of the study, notwithstanding the overall interest and coherence of all the constituent articles.

The One Object discussion is introduced by Ayla Lepine, in an essay entitled Resurrection, Re-Imagination, Reconstruction:
New Viewpoints on the Hereford Screen.

 

Essays in the discussion that focus on medieval material are:

The Hereford Screen: A Prehistory, by medievalist Matthew Reeve, guides the reader through a history of the medieval predecessors of the Hereford screen and places its production in the context of the Cathedral space and the architect’s work at Lichfield and Salisbury.

Jacqueline Jung’s contribution, a video essay entitled, The Medieval Choir Screen in Sacred Space, considers the sight-lines and sculptural relationships created by the strategically designed perforations and interior figural programmes of medieval screens and their host churches, focusing on two examples from 13th-century Italy and 15th-century Germany.

The oddly fragile, contentious choir screen, in its many historical manifestations, receives a colourful and polyphonic tribute in this One Object study. As a medieval art blog, links to the most relevant essays are given above but are, for best results, to be enjoyed with their Gothic Revival companions.

New Book Series: Christianities Before Modernity

 

Challenging the perception of Christianity as a unified and European religion before the sixteenth century, this series interrogates the traditional chronological, geographical, social, and institutional boundaries of premodern Christianity. Books in this series seek to rebuild the lived experiences and religious worlds of understudied people as well as landmark disputes and iconic figures by recovering underappreciated vernacular sources, situating localized problems and mundane practices within broader social contexts, and addressing questions framed by contemporary theoretical and methodological conversations.

Christianities Before Modernity embraces an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, publishing on history, literature, music, theater, classics, folklore, art history, archaeology, religious studies, philosophy, gender studies, anthropology, sociology, and other areas.

Grounded in original sources and informed by ongoing disciplinary disputes, this series demonstrates how premodern Christians comprised diverse and conflicted communities embedded in a religiously diverse world.

Series Editors:

Rabia Gregory, University of Missouri

Kathleen E. Kennedy, Pennsylvania State Brandywine

Susanna A. Throop, Ursinus College

Charlene Villaseñor Black, UCLA

Advisory Board:

Adnan A. Husain, Queen’s University

István Perczel, Central European University

Eyal Poleg, Queen Mary University of London

Carl S. Watkins, Magdalene College, Cambridge

Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/christianities-before-modernity/. For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact the acquisitions

editor, Erika Gaffney (Erika.Gaffney@arc‐humanities.org).

 

6th June 2017, Public Lecture with Prof Paul Binski: Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality

All are welcome to this free event at the Clagett Auditorium, Canterbury Cathedral Lodge. It will be held on Tuesday the 6th of June from 18.30-19.30.

Professor Paul Binski, from the University of Cambridge, will be exploring Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality.

Further details can be found in the accompanying poster:

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CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Sociey of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

tumblr_oqexa0oz8t1syzcjgo1_500CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Society of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

Organised by: Maggie Crosland, Saida Bondini and Costanza Beltrami, PhD Candidates, The Courtauld Institute of Art

As (art) historians we often use documents as evidence. Indeed, what could offer us more direct information about an object, artwork or building than the records of the material used to construct it, or the payments for its labour?

And yet, the mechanisms through which uniquely useful documents such as inventories, contracts and payment accounts are produced are not always transparent. In fact, these are formulaic documents written within tight conventions, for specific economic or legal ends. In this session, we aim to investigate how these records came to be, how they relate to the objects they purportedly explain and how they influence our perception, analysis and conclusions on the past and its relics.

In proposing this session, we are interested in uncovering what documents hide. For example, a contract must often be the final product of a long and multiple discussion. As such, this document reduces the interaction of several people — masters, family members, advisors, apprentices etc. to the legal agreement between just two, effacing all the other voices as well as the temporal dimension of reflection, creation, and changes of mind.

A goal of this session is to provide a platform through which scholars of different media and geographic location can discuss the complexities and implications of relying on and using primary documents. As such, we are interested in paper proposals that engage with such documents from a range of standpoints.

Suggested topics include:

– The temporal and plural vision of the past as hidden or revealed through documents

– Establishing patron-artist networks through primary sources

– Implications of agency and patronage

– The bureaucratic nature of artist contracts and payment accounts

– Missing conversations – how to look beyond the one-to-one relationship suggested by contracts and payment accounts

–  Reconstructing the lost/missing archive

– Early modern and modern historiography on the use of primary sources

– What information remains hidden in the archive, and what is published and promoted instead? What does this tell us about our changing perception and efforts to shape the past?

To be considered for our panel, please email costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk with:

-The title of your proposed paper (15-word maximum)
– Abstract (150-word maximum)
– 5 keywords
– A very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum), formatted to the RSA’s standards.
Please note that the deadline for applications is June 4, 2017.

The Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship at the Warburg. Deadline 23 June 2017

WarburgThe Warburg Institute invites enquiries and applications for the award of the Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship for the period from October 2017 to September 2020.

Applications are welcome from candidates of any nationality. Applicants should possess, or be about to receive, an MA degree or equivalent. The Fritz Saxl Studentship will be awarded on the basis of outstanding academic performance, the quality of the research proposal and promise of scholarly excellence.

The Fritz Saxl Studentship has been established to support an outstanding PhD applicant who wishes to conduct their research at the Warburg Institute and has applied to register for a PhD at the Institute.  The successful applicant will have an outstanding research proposal and a genuine and demonstrable interest in being supervised by a member of the Warburg Institute faculty.  The award will be made for entry in Autumn 2017 and will include:

  • The full payment of tuition fees at Home/EU levels (worth up to £6,240 per year at 2017/18 rates) for three years.
  • A maintenance stipend worth £16,000 at 2017/18 rates for a period of three years.

The Warburg Institute is the premier institute in the world for the study of cultural history and the role of images in culture. It is cross-disciplinary and global. It is concerned with the histories of art and science, and their relationship with superstition, magic and popular beliefs. Its researches are historical, philological and anthropological. It is dedicated to the study of the survival and transmission of cultural forms – whether in literature, art, music or science – across borders and from the earliest times to the present. In setting out the historical, psychological, anthropological and political dimensions of art and culture, the work of Aby Warburg underlines the continuing relevance of the humanities today.

Studying at the Warburg Institute provides access to scholars and Fellows of the highest calibre in professional and research terms. Contact hours and consultation with academic staff is one of the most favourable to be found in any academic institution. There is also the advantage of access to the Warburg Library, one of the world’s finest, as well as the Photographic Collection and Warburg Institute Archive. Lectures are friendly and intimate, and there is a constant flow of academics of international standing through our doors, as well as regular scholarly conferences, seminars and events which attract the larger academic community.

The Warburg Institute offers doctoral research supervision in the following broad areas:

  • Art History, visual and material culture
  • Cultural and Intellectual History
  • Humanism and the history of scholarship
  • Renaissance philosophy and the history and transmission of ideas
  • History of Science
  • History of the Book
  • Arabic and Islamic influences in Europe
  • Folk Practice

Further information about the Institute, staff and research interests and current PhD topics can be found at http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/

Eligibility

Applicants for the Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship must have submitted an application for registration as a PhD student at the Warburg Institute to commence in October 2017.  The Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship is only open to new applicants for a PhD and not for continuing PhD students.

 

How to apply

There is no application form. Applications should be made by signed and dated letter addressed to Ms C E Charlton, Associate Director (Administration), The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB.  Your letter of application should contain a clear and comprehensive statement setting out your reasons for applying for the Studentship and a copy of your research proposal should be supplied with the letter. You should also indicate clearly in your on line PhD application form that it is your intention to apply for the Fritz Saxl Studentship.

Candidates must submit their application for the award of a Fritz Saxl Studentship at the same time as they submit their application for registration as a PhD student at the Warburg Institute.  Applications must be submitted by no later than 23 June 2017.logo

Conférence – Didier Martens, «Byzance dans le Nord : icônes de saint Luc dans la peinture flamande du XVe au XVIIe siècle»

iconByzance dans le Nord : icônes de saint Luc dans la peinture flamande du XVe au XVIIe siècle

par Didier Martens, historien de l’art et germaniste, professeur à l’Université libre de Bruxelles, auteur de nombreux ouvrages dont Peinture flamande et goût ibérique XVème-XVIème siècles (Le Livre Timperman, Bruxelles, 2010)

Lieu : Académie royale de Belgique
Palais des Académies, 1 rue Ducale, 1000 Bruxelles (Espace Baudouin)
Date : Jeudi 4 mai 2017 à 18h00
Inscriptions : info@koregos.org

Programme (Académie royale de Belgique) :

18h00 Accueil
18h15 Mot d’accueil par Monsieur Marc Seminckx
Président du Conseil d’administration de Koregos
18h25 Conférence
Byzance dans le Nord : icônes de saint Luc dans la peinture flamande du XVe au XVIIe siècle
par Monsieur Didier Martens

À partir du XVe siècle, des représentations de la Vierge à l’Enfant attribuées à l’évangéliste Luc vont commencer à circuler dans le nord-ouest de l’Europe, sous la forme de copies plus ou moins fidèles venues d’Italie.

Ces images, procédant de modèles byzantins, seront considérées comme des témoignages véridiques, ayant valeur de documents quant à l’aspect physique du Christ et de sa Mère. Elles susciteront dès les années 1490 de nombreux miracles et donneront lieu à des pèlerinages. L’engouement du public pour ces représentations estimées authentiques amènera à son tour, dans les anciens Pays-Bas, une importante production de copies.

Avant le XVIIe siècle, le modèle byzantin fut le plus souvent adapté aux traditions artistiques locales : l’icône fut sans autre forme de procès convertie en un panneau de Primitif flamand.

À partir du XVIIe siècle, les copistes s’efforceront en revanche d’imiter le plus fidèlement possible leurs modèles et créeront ainsi un étonnant style néo-byzantin. En réalité, il est clair que l’art de Byzance plaisait peu aux peintres des XVe, XVIe et XVIIe siècles et que la valorisation des icônes pour des raisons d’ordre religieux a donné naissance à un véritable conflit entre esthétique et dévotion, goût et authenticité.

C’est à ce conflit et à la difficile gestion de la différence artistique durant trois siècles d’art flamand que sera consacrée la présente conférence.

Entrée gratuite. Inscription souhaitée avant le 2 mai à l’adresse : info@koregos.org

CONF: WerkStattWissen – The Work of Art (Bern, 31 May – 2 Jun 17)

The Work of Art – Material and Technology in Sources and Workshop Practice

irene painting a diptych of christ

Irene painting a diptych (of Christ?).

The variety of traditional sources poses a challenge to accessing practical knowledge in historical workshops. Texts and pictorial representations provide information on the production of materials and art works, but are not always reliable. What was their audience and purpose? Does the source result from hands-on experience, does it simply recapitulate older information or leave out essential details in order to preserve valuable workshop secrets?

From 31 May to 2 June 2017, the international conference “WerkStattWissen – The Work of Art” as part of the SNSF project “New Approaches to Art Technological Resources” sets out to evaluate a wide array of art technological sources. The conference consists of three panels examining historical texts and illustrations with regard to their reception and their application for restoration.

Programm / Details
hkb.bfh.ch/werkstattwissen

Registration
werkstattwissen@hkb.bfh.ch

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