Job: Ass. teaching prof. in History of Architecture, Pennsylvania State University, deadline January 15, 2019

Penn20State20Old20Main20tulipsThe Department of Art History at The Pennsylvania State University seeks to appoint a three-year fixed-term assistant teaching professor with a specialization in ancient or medieval architecture of any geography. The appointment will begin on August 1, 2019 and carry the possibility of renewal. We are particularly interested in candidates conversant in diverse methodologies, including those involving new technologies and/or technical art history. The department values dynamic teachers who are prepared to lead upper level undergraduate and graduate courses in their field, as well as teach large introductory classes in the history of Western architecture. Expectations include undergraduate advising, graduate mentoring, and departmental and university service. Preference will be given to candidates who have a Ph.D. in art history or a related discipline.

To apply go to https://psu.edu.jobs/ job #84579, candidates should upload a letter of application, an up-to-date CV, and the names and contact information for three references to the Penn State Electronic Job Management System.  Applications received by January 15 will be assured full consideration.  However, applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

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Medieval Touch: Handling session at the British Museum on scientific instruments in medieval and Renaissance Europe

On Weds 21st November 2018, Lloyd de Beer, Naomi Speakman, and Oliver Cooke kindly allowed students and staff from the Courtauld Institute of Art and elsewhere into the horological storerooms of the British Museum, the latest in a series of handling sessions organised by Medieval Touch. Dr Jeanne Nuechterlein of the University of York led the group in a joint examination of a series of mostly sixteenth-century scientific instruments, including replicas from her own collection.horology

We began by looking together at an astrolabe. Astrolabes were observational and calculating instruments and allowed users to tell the time through the position of the stars in relation to the astral map on the astrolabe itself, however your ability to do so was contingent upon any number of factors, not least the environmental conditions.

 

As well as explaining their purpose, Jeanne attempted to instruct us all in their use and as each of us tried and frequently failed to grasp the fundamentals of astrolabe reading, it became apparent that astrolabes are not intuitive instruments. Their use implies and demands significant technical experience and knowledge. We questioned whether this knowledge was simply more widespread in the early modern world or whether utility was not their only value. Even when we consider astrolabes purely in practical use, several limiting factors would have dictated how and by whom they were employed. Astrolabes are geographically specific instruments, each backplate designed for a set latitude – the mobile user would have required multiple plates. Moreover, larger instruments were more easily legible and produced more accurate readings.

Certain instruments that survive like this column shaped sundial were too elaborately shaped to be of any functional use. Their design seems to effect other concerns, perhaps commemorative (was this the model of a larger monumental sundial?) or aesthetic.

3

However, other instruments were clearly more useable. Ivory diptych sundials like these 16th-century examples from Nuremberg, appear to have been designed for the Early Modern traveller. Handy and conveniently pocket sized, they also offered a range of adjustable settings depending on location.

 

London to Naples, Portugal to Constantinople: the lists of cities on these objects, clustering around the cities of Mitteleuropa and Northern Italy, Bremen, Königsberg, Venice and Genoa, spoke to some of us of a now lost trading geography of Europe. However, made of ivory and not unelaborately decorated, these objects were demonstrably prestige items and must have elicited viewing as much as reading.

A glance at the range of sundials in the cabinets of the horological department reveals the complex interplay of aesthetic and practical motives at work in these objects.

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Here’s what we saw, all visible on the British Museum’s website:

Sundial/horary quadrant, England 14th c., 1972,0104.1
Sundial etc., Hans Dorn 1492, 1894,0615.1
Astrolabe, Georg Hartmann 1532, 1871,1115.3
Crucifix polyhedral sundial, Georg Hartmann 1541, 1894,0722.1
Astronomical compendium/wind-vane, Christopher Schissler c. 1550, 1855,0904.1
Sundial in the form of dividers, Christopher Schissler 1558, 1888,1201.283
Universal equinoctial dial with case, Christopher Schissler c. 1570, 1922,0705.3
Regiomontanus-style sundial, Caspar Vopel 1551, 1895,0319.1
Crucifix sundial, Melchior Reichle 1569, 1874,0727.3
Standing cup in the form of a celestial globe, French, 1569, AF.3060
Pillar dial in the form of a Corinthian column, Germany, 1593, 1888,1201.282
Scaphe sundial, Germany late 16th c., 1922,0705.6
Sundial etc., Netherlands late 16th c.?, 1871,1115.5
European celestial globe from 1659, 1896,0322.1
17c armillary sphere, 1855,1201.221
Diptych dial, Hartmann, 1562, 1900,1017.1

Many thanks again to Jeanne for a fascinating session!

CFP: ‘Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art’, Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium, London, Friday 8 February 2019

image-1024x745The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider issues and opportunities encountered by medieval artists and viewers in relation to size and scale.

Deadline: 16 November 2018

From micro-architectural reliquaries and minute boxwood prayer beads to colossal sculpture and the built spaces of grand cathedrals and civic structures, size mattered in medieval art. Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences.

Inspired by the ‘Russian doll’ relationship between the Sainte Chapelle in Paris and its micro-architectural miniature in the form of a gilded reliquary in the Musée de Cluny, Scaling the Middle Ages seeks to explore a range of questions surrounding proportion, scale, size, and measurement in relation to medieval art and architecture. The Sainte Chapelle, built by the saint-king of France Louis IX to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, is itself often described as an over-sized reliquary turned inside-out. The Cluny reliquary – made to house relics of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien held within the chapel – both complicates and compliments that comparison, at once shrinking the chapel back down to size through close architectural quotation of its form in miniature and pointing the viewer’s attention back to that same, larger space. The relationship between these two artefacts raises a host of questions, including:

Scale and making

How were ideas about size and scale communicated between patrons, architects, craftspeople, and artists? In an age without universal standardised units of measurement, how did craftsmen negotiate problems of scale and proportion?

How were the measurements of a medieval building determined? What techniques did architects, masons, and artists use to determine the scale of their work?

Scale and meaning

What effects were achieved and what responses evoked by the manipulation of scale, from the minute to the massive, in medieval art?

What was the role of proportion and scale in architectural ‘copies’ or quotations?

What representational problems were encountered by artists approaching out-sized subjects, such as giants?

How was scale manipulated in order to communicate hierarchy or relative importance in medieval art?

How did size and scale function in competition between patrons or communities in their artistic commissions and built environments?

Problems of scale

What, if anything, happened when something was the wrong size? When was something too big, or too small? And how were such problems solved by patrons and makers?

How does the disembodied viewing of medieval art through digital surrogates distort or assist in our perception of scale?

How can modern measuring techniques and digital technology enhance our understanding of medieval objects and buildings?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these and related issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing buildings and objects from across the Middle Ages (broadly understood in geographical and chronological terms). The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research.

To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to teresa.lane@courtauld.ac.uk and oliver.mitchell@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 16 November 2018.

Organised by Oliver Mitchell and Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Job: Professor/in fuer Allg. Mittlere und Neuere Kunstgeschichte, Innsbruck

universitat-innsbruckInstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Philosophisch-Historische Fakultät, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck
Application deadline: Nov 14, 2018

Ausschreibung der Stelle einer/eines Universitätsprofessorin/ Universitätsprofessors für Allgemeine Kunstgeschichte mit Schwerpunkt Mittlere und Neuere Kunstgeschichte

Am Institut für Kunstgeschichte der Philosophisch-Historische Fakultät der Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck ist die Stelle einer/eines

gemäß § 98 UG 2002 in Form eines unbefristeten privatrechtlichen Arbeitsverhältnisses mit der Universität zu besetzen.

AUFGABEN

Die Stelleninhaberin / der Stelleninhaber soll das Fach Allgemeine Kunstgeschichte mit Schwerpunkt Mittlere und Neuere Kunstgeschichte in seiner ganzen Breite in Forschung und Lehre vertreten. Der Forschungsschwerpunkt soll in einem oder mehreren Themenbereichen im Zeitrahmen von Spätantike bis ausgehender früher Neuzeit liegen.

Die Forschungstätigkeit sollte ihren Niederschlag auch in internationalen Tagungen, Publikationen und drittmittelfinanzierten Forschungsprojekten finden.

Gewünscht ist eine vielfältig vernetzte Forscher/innenpersönlichkeit, die fähig und bereit ist, interdisziplinär zu arbeiten und neue Impulse zu geben.

Die Stelleninhaberin / der Stelleninhaber soll sich jedenfalls in den universitären Forschungsschwerpunkt „Kulturelle Begegnungen & Kulturelle Konflikte“ einbringen.

Die Mitarbeit in der akademischen Selbstverwaltung wird erwartet.

ANSTELLUNGSERFORDERNISSE

a)    eine der Verwendung entsprechende abgeschlossene inländische oder gleichwertige ausländische Hochschulbildung;
b)    einschlägige Lehrbefugnis (Habilitation) oder gleichzuhaltende Eignung;
c)    fachspezifische Monographien und Publikationen in international anerkannten Publikationsorganen und Fachzeitschriften
d)    Nachweis der Einbindung in internationale Forschung;
e)    Erfahrung in der Einwerbung von Drittmitteln;
f)    nachgewiesene didaktische Fähigkeiten aufgrund universitärer Lehrerfahrung;
g)    Führungskompetenz (Sozial-, Problemlösungs- und Organisationskompetenz).

Bewerbungen müssen bis spätestens 14.11.2018
an der Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, Fakultäten Servicestelle, Standort Innrain 52f, A-6020 Innsbruck (fss-innrain52f@uibk.ac.at) eingelangt sein.

Die Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck strebt eine Erhöhung des Frauenanteiles an und lädt deshalb qualifizierte Frauen zur Bewerbung ein. Frauen werden bei gleicher Qualifikation vorrangig aufgenommen.

Für diese Position ist eine Einreihung in die Verwendungsgruppe A1 des Kollektivvertrages für ArbeitnehmerInnen der Universitäten und ein Mindestentgelt von € 5.005,10/Monat (14 mal) vorgesehen. Ein in Abhängigkeit von Qualifikation und Erfahrung höheres Entgelt und die Ausstattung der Professur sind Gegenstand von Berufungsverhandlungen. Darüber hinaus bietet die Universität zahlreiche attraktive Zusatzleistungen (http://www.uibk.ac.at/universitaet/zusatzleistungen/).

Die Bewerbungsunterlagen sollen jedenfalls enthalten: Lebenslauf mit einer Beschreibung des wissenschaftlichen und beruflichen Werdeganges, Liste der wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen, der Vorträge sowie der sonstigen wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten und Projekte, Beschreibung abgeschlossener, laufender und geplanter Forschungstätigkeiten und die fünf wichtigsten Arbeiten. Die Bewerbungsunterlagen sind jedenfalls digital (CD, E-Mail usw.) beizubringen. Die Papierform ist optional.

Laufende Informationen über den Stand des Verfahrens finden Sie unter: http://www.uibk.ac.at/fakultaeten-servicestelle/standorte/innrain52f/berufungen_habilitationen/berufungen_index_2010.html

Conference: ‘Medieval Seas’, 11 Bedford Square, London, November 17, 2018, 10.30-18.00

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f507276722f2187637322172f12foriginal‘Medieval Seas’ brings together scholars from the fields of history, archaeology and literature to explore our medieval maritime past. Dr Aisling Byrne, Dr David Harrap, Dr James Barratt, Dr Craig Lambert and Dr Alfred Hiatt will examine representations of the sea in literature and cartography, the development of maritime liturgies and the latest maritime projects which have aided scholars in learning more about the sea in the Middle Ages. Over lunch join Dr Rachel Moss as she discusses the new project ‘Women at Sea’ and asks ‘can we build a feminist medieval maritime?’

Click here for tickets

Organised by the London Medieval Society

Fellowship: International Fellowship Program at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

01_stipendienDeadline: 31 December 2018

Launched in 2009, the International Fellowship Program (ISP) offers the opportunity to international researchers, especially early career scholars, to conduct research at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
The program supports projects that are directly related with the diverse institutions and the rich collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. The fellowships, which can be held to up to three months, allow researchers to work on their individual projects and to establish professional contacts at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. The program aims to strengthen the position of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin in the international research network and therefore specifically addresses scholars who do not reside in Germany. The fellows will also gain the opportunity to participate in the academic and cultural life at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz.
The applicants must hold at least a first university degree (M.A. or equivalent degree) by the time of the application.

The application deadline is December 31st 2018 for next academic year from September 2019 to June 2020.

Please submit your application in one PDF file till December 31st 2018 to forschung@smb.spk-berlin.de

For the application form, the guidelines and queries on the program please consult our website
http://www.smb.museum/en/research/scholarship-programmes/international-scholarship-programme.html
or contact
forschung@smb.spk-berlin.de

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-charlatanesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com