Conference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford, Saturday 18th November 2017

astonomytodeleteConference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford – Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, Saturday 18th November 2017

10.30 am – 5.00 pm

The celestial sky has been a source of fascination since ancient times with astronomy being the oldest of the natural sciences. During the medieval period, astronomy flourished in many cultures across the world, some of which followed on from earlier models created by Ptolemy. The motions of the celestial bodies were investigated, early astronomical observatories were built and some cultures constructed remarkable monuments inspired by astronomical insights. This conference will draw together the different strands of medieval astronomy from across the world and will examine how they interfaced and paved the way for the scientific developments later in the Renaissance.

Registration to attend this conference is free, but must be confirmed using the Conference booking form by midday on Friday 10th November 2017.

Confirmed speakers include:

Dr Giles Gasper (Durham University) – `The Service of Astronomy’ – European Star-Gazing and Its Implications in the Middle Ages

Professor Christopher Cullen (University of Cambridge) – Chinese Astronomy in a World Context

Dr Josep Casulleras (University of Barcelona) – From Ancient to Modern: Astronomy in Medieval Islam

Professor Ivan Šprajc (Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts) – Mayan and Aztec Astronomy: Skywatching in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

Dr Benno van Dalen (Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities) – Ptolemaic Astronomy and Its Dissemination in the Islamic World, Europe and Asia

There will be a conference dinner at St Cross in the evening following the end of the conference with an after-dinner talk by Dr Valerie Shrimplin (Gresham College) on the influence of astronomy and the cosmos on medieval art. Although the conference itself is free of charge, the dinner carries a cost of £35 to attend – booking a place for dinner can be done here.

For more information see the website: https://www.stx.ox.ac.uk/happ/events/astronomy-across-medieval-world-one-day-conference

 

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Job: Assistant Professor of Medieval or Early Modern Mediterranean History, Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, USA

kh2012_stackcenter_1cJob: Assistant Professor of Medieval or Early Modern Mediterranean History
Deadline: Open until filled/October 16, 2017

The Department of History at Kalamazoo College invites applications for a tenure-track position as assistant professor of Medieval or Early Modern Mediterranean history, to begin in September 2018. As the sole member of the department responsible for this period, the successful candidate will be expected to offer introductory and upper-division undergraduate courses on the Mediterranean, Europe, and the Islamic world or Colonial Latin America. These classes should reflect their specific expertise and the broader geographic and conceptual scope of the field. We also seek applicants willing and able to help reimagine the department’s current curriculum. We are especially interested in transnational approaches to Mediterranean history focusing on issues such as (but not limited to) ethnicity, migration, majority/minority relations, gender, and the interaction between the different religious and imperial entities of the region. The successful applicant will also teach within the College’s Shared Passages Program of first-year and sophomore seminars and senior capstone courses. The teaching load is six courses per year on a quarter system (2/2/2), with additional duties including directing senior theses and academic advising.

Ph.D. or evidence of imminent completion is required. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. The successful candidate will have demonstrated a high aptitude for and interest in undergraduate teaching, a commitment to the liberal arts, and a promise of scholarly excellence.

Kalamazoo College is a highly selective nationally known liberal arts college offering an integrated undergraduate experience that weaves a traditional liberal arts curriculum into educational experiences in both domestic and international settings. The campus is located midway between Chicago and Detroit in Kalamazoo, Michigan, a metropolitan community of 225,000 that supports several college and university campuses along with numerous civic arts and cultural associations.

Completed applications received by October 16, 2017 will receive full consideration, with later applications reviewed as needed until the position is filled. Upload cover letter, CV, detailed statement of teaching philosophy and goals, description of scholarly interests, statement on experience working with underrepresented students and engaging issues of diversity and inclusion in the curriculum and pedagogical approaches, and undergraduate and graduate transcripts (unofficial acceptable) in PDF format below. Please have three confidential letters of recommendation sent in PDF format to HistorySearch@kzoo.edu with a subject line in the format lastname_firstname. Please send all inquiries to Dr. Joseph J. Bangura, Chair of the Search Committee.

European History 1150-1550 Seminars @ IHR: 2017-2018 Programme

800px-1450_c2bf_carta_catalana_jpeg_copy-aEuropean History 1150-1550
Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR, North block, Senate House
Thursdays 17:30

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL), Marie Legendre (SOAS)

 

Autumn Term 2017

Date Seminar details
5 October

17:30

Pretenders and returners: Dynastic imposters in the Middle Ages

Robert Bartlett (University of St Andrews)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

19 October

17:30

Hunting at the court of King John of England

Hugh Thomas (Miami College of Arts and Sciences)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

2 November

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Daisy Livingston (School of Oriental and African Studies), Martin Hall (Royal Holloway University of London)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

16 November

17:30

Trust and authority: Pragmatic literacy and communication in the royal towns of medieval Hungary

Katalin Szende (Central European University)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

30 November

18:00

The Creighton Lecture 2017. Strangers in Medieval Cities

Miri Rubin (Queen Mary University of London)

IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02, Basement, IHR

14 December

17:30

The rise of administrative lordship in medieval Flanders: New perspectives

Jean-François Nieus (University of Namur)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Spring Term 2018

Date Seminar details
11 January

17:30

Trustworthy men: How inequality and faith made the medieval church

Ian Forrest (University of Oxford)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

25 January

17:30

Government and inquests from Philip Augustus to the last Capetians

Marie Dejoux (Pantheon-Sorbonne University Paris1)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 February

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Anaïs Waag (King’s College London), Cecil Reid (Queen Mary University of London)

Room 243, Second Floor

22 February

17:30

Petrifying wealth: The southern European shift to masonry as collective investment in identity, c. 1050-1300

Ana María Rodríguez López (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 March

17:30

Observing Religion: High medieval religious movements and their polemical vocabularies

Sita Steckel (University of Münster)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Job: Assistant Professor of Mediterranean History, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, USA

unit-16474Job: Assistant Professor of Mediterranean History (Tenure Track), Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA., USA.
Deadline: 15th October, 2017

he History Department of Washington and Lee University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship in Mediterranean history, 500-1500 C.E., beginning September 2018. Special consideration will be given to candidates who can situate Mediterranean history in a global context by contributing to the Africana Studies, Middle East and South Asia Studies, and/or Medieval and Renaissance Studies Programs. Candidates whose research focuses on issues such as, but not limited to, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, cross-cultural contact, religious cooperation and conflict, urbanism and/or empire are particularly encouraged to apply. Successful applicants will be expected to teach introductory surveys as well as intermediate and advanced undergraduate courses related to their areas of specialization.

For further information click here.

History of Liturgy Seminars @ Institute of Historical Research, London: 2017-2018 Programme

f020_massHistory of Liturgy Seminars 2017-2018


Mondays 17.15-19.15
John S Cohen Room N203, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, London WC1E 7HU

2 October 2017                   Teresa Webber (University of Cambridge): The Chapter Office and Reading in Chapter: monastic practice c. 1000-1300

13 November  2017          Henry Parkes (Yale University): Matins Responsories and Narratives of Divine Encounter

5 February 2018                 Isabelle Cochelin (University of Toronto): Decrypting Monastic Customaries

5 March 2018                       Iris Shagrir (Open University of Israel): Liturgical Vision and Liturgical Practice in Crusader Jerusalem

This will be a joint session with the Crusades and the Latin East seminar

21 May 2018                         Roundtable discussion: What roles did rubrics play in medieval liturgy?

11 June 2018                        Arthur Westwell (University of Cambridge): Conquering by the Book: Did the Carolingians bring a New Liturgy to the Kingdom of Italy?

AND

David Harrap (QMUL): Consecratio Navis: Maritime Liturgies in Medieval and Early Modern England

Convenors: Nicolas Bell, Matthew Champion, Helen Gittos, Sarah Hamilton, Kati Ihnat, Eyal Poleg, Matthew Cheung Salisbury, Elizabeth Solopova, Teresa Webber

Sponsored by: Henry Bradshaw Society, Institute of Historical Research, Birkbeck and Queen Mary, University of London

 

For any inquiries please contact Helen Gittos or Eyal Poleg (H.B.Gittos@kent.ac.uk or e.poleg@qmul.ac.uk)

Post-doc: 3 positions at the University of Louvain, ‘The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission’

photoPost-doc: 3 position, 3-year contracts, ERC Advanced project 740618: The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission (2017-2022), Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Deadline: 10 November 2017

PhilAnd is a five-year Advanced ERC project to start in October 2017 at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) under the supervision of Prof. Godefroid de Callataÿ. The objective of PhilAnd is to conduct a large-scale exploration of how, and under which form, philosophy appeared for the first time in al-Andalus. At the crossroads of several major lines of enquiries in modern scholarship and in line with recent discoveries having important chronological implications, PhilAnd focuses on the 10th century, a period usually disregarded by historians on the assumption that philosophy as such was not cultivated in the Iberian Peninsula before the 11th-12th centuries. Its originality is also to put emphasis on ‘ill-defined’ materials and channels of transmission, a field which remains largely unexplored. PhilAnd will be conducted in partnership with the Warburg Institute (University of London).
As part of this project, three post-doc positions of three years each (to start from 2 January 2018) are offered at the UCL in relation with the three following sub-projects (SP):
1) the Ikhwān al-afā’: This SP will aim at producing a comprehensive survey of all the elements which are likely to inform us about the chronology of redaction and – where applicable – of introduction into al-Andalus of the three works that have commonly been ascribed in sources to this most influential group of thinkers known as Ikhwān al-Ṣafā’ (‘The Brethren of Purity’), namely: a) the Rasā’il (‘the Epistles’); b) the Risāla Jāmi‘a (‘The Comprehensive Epistle’) and, c) the Risāla Jāmi‘at al-Jāmi‘a (‘The Super-Comprehensive Epistle’). This chronology is currently far from clear.
2) Ibn Washiyya and the Nabatean Corpus: This SP aims to evaluate the impact of the Filāḥa Nabaṭiyya (‘The Nabatean Agriculture’), a complex and enigmatic Arabic treatise on agriculture written in the Orient, on the development of both Islamic and Jewish Neoplatonism in al-Andalus from the 10th to the 12th century. The focus will be on the reception of the ‘philosophical’ and bāṭinī (rather than agronomical) aspects of the work, with the aim of understanding why this notoriously esoteric work remained so influential even to Jewish thinkers like Judah Halevi and Maimonides.
3) Ibn Masarra: This SP will lead to the first monograph entirely devoted to Ibn Masarra’s Kitāb khawāṣṣ al-ḥurūf (‘The Book of the Properties of Letters’), consisting of an extensively annotated translation of this mystical treatise, together with an in-depth exploration of its place in the history of ‘ilm al-ḥurūf, the Islamic science of letters – including its links with the Jewish Kabbala – up to the time of Ibn ‘Arabī. This will fill an important gap and provide a valuable resource for the study of Islamic mysticism in al-Andalus.

The qualifications required for any of these sub-projects are:

  1. a PhD in Islamic Studies, in Middle Eastern Studies, or related fields;
  2. an excellent command of Classical Arabic (the knowledge of additional languages such as ancient Greek, Latin and in particular Hebrew is considered an advantage);
  3. a first-rate track record and research experience;
  4. publications of articles in peer-reviewed international journals or monographs with recognized academic publishers;
  5. academic writing and presentation skills in English (the working language of the project);
  6. the ability to work both individually and as part of a team.

These three post-doc positions are full-time equivalent. They are offered for a period of 12 months, renewable twice (three years in total) upon good performance. The post-docs retained will be required to reside in Belgium for the whole period of their fellowship. They will be asked to contribute to the intellectual life of the ERC project and of the UCL.


How to apply?

Applications should be made via pdf files and contain the following:

(1) a cover letter setting out the candidate’s qualifications and motivation for applying for one of the three positions offered (maximum 2 pages);

(2) a curriculum vitae (maximum 3 pages);

(3) a list of publications;

(4) two samples of published work (articles, chapters) in pdf (preferably in English);

(5) a transcript of grades and/or copy of the PhD certificate;

(6) the name (with title, affiliation and email) of four people who have accepted to be contacted as potential referees.
Applications should be made electronically and sent to the following address:

godefroid.decallatay@uclouvain.be

The application deadline is 10 November 2017
Interviews will be arranged between 4 and 6 December 2017.

Candidates selected for the interviews will be contacted by mid-November 2017, and asked to write a short research design on a topic to be announced at that moment.

Employment should become effective from 2 January 2018.

Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018

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Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS, London: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018
All lectures begin at 7.00 p.m. in the Khalili Lecture Theatre (Main School Lecture Theatre) –  unless indicated otherwise – Philips Building, SOAS, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

 

  • 11 October 2017: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings,’ Dr Tom Nickson, Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • 15 November 2017: Reviving Islamic Architecture in Khedivial Cairo, and Beyond: a Collector’s Passion, Dr Mercedes Volait, CRNS Research Professor at INHA, Paris
  • 6 December 2017: Takht-e Soleyman/Iran – From Sasanian Fire Temple to Ilkhanid Summer Palace. New Evidence from Old Excavations, Dr Ute Franke,                                       Deputy Director, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Berlin
  • 10 January 2018: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture: The Calligrapher, the Painter, and the Patron: A New Perspective on the Freer Khusraw u Shirin, Dr Simon Rettig, Assistant Curator of Islamic Art, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • 21 February 2018: In the service of religion? The display of ‘science from the Islamic world’ in the museum, Dr Silke Ackermann, Director, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford
  • 14 March 2018: The Seventh Bahari Foundation Lecture in Iranian Art and Culture: Decagonal and Quasicrystalline Geometry in the Architecture of Medieval Persia and Its Influence in the Greater Islamic World, Dr Peter J. Lu, Department of Physics and SEAS, Harvard University, USA
  • 25 April 2018: Islamic Textiles from Iberia: Re-evaluating Their Role in the Mediterranean Context, Dr Ana Cabrera-Lafuente, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • 9 May 2018: Ilse Sturkenboom
  • 13 June 2018: Ahmet Ersoy

For further information please contact Rosalind Wade Haddon: 07714087480 or                 rosalindhaddon@gmail.com