Medieval jobs! Curator of medieval manuscripts at the Bodleian Library

R. W. Hunt Curator of Medieval Manuscripts

We are seeking a Curator of Medieval Western Manuscripts to work in the Weston Library, the home of the Bodleian’s Special Collections. You will carry out a full range of curatorial activities and duties, including creating catalogue descriptions of medieval manuscripts. You will be answering enquiries and supervising the reading rooms, supporting all aspects of teaching and learning with manuscripts, and carrying out research on the collections. You will also be assisting with exhibitions and public engagement activities, participating in acquisitions work, and supporting fundraising initiatives.

You will have an honours degree and a postgraduate degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent academic achievement), experience of cataloguing medieval manuscripts, and a reading knowledge of Latin. An ability to communicate with a broad range of people in presenting the collections is essential, as is a commitment both to the care of the collections and to a high level of service to readers.

This is a permanent, full-time post.

Benefits include 38 days’ leave (including bank holidays and fixed closures), a generous pension scheme, extensive training and development opportunities, access to travel and childcare schemes, free entry to colleges, discounted access to sporting facilities and a wide range of other staff discounts.

You will be required to upload a supporting statement as part of your online application. Your supporting statement should list each of the essential and desirable selection criteria, as listed in the further particulars, and explain how you meet each one. CVs alone will not form part of the selection process.

Only applications received online before 12.00 midday on Thursday 19 September 2019 can be considered.

Further details: https://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/about/jobs#vacancy-140881 

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CFP: ‘Cave Architecture and Art in the Middle Ages’ at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020 

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020 

Cave churches, monasteries and dwellings can be admired throughout the Mediterranean, where they often appear next to and even intertwined with the built environment. And yet, with the exception of southern Italy and Cappadocia, they are rarely included in studies of the art and architecture in the Mediterranean (broadly understood). This session seeks to explore the role of cave architecture and art in the urban topography of Eurasia and Africa. 

With the exception of Ethiopia and Cappadocia, caves structures are often dismissed because of their small size and simplicity. However, caves and other underground spaces played essential roles in medieval cultures, as demonstrated by their mural decorations and how they appear in hagiographies, pilgrimage accounts and other genres of literature. We are looking for multi-disciplinary papers that argue for the integration of cave architectures within our understanding of the broader Mediterranean during the medieval period. Papers from all disciplines are encouraged. 

Please send paper proposals of 300 words to the session organsier, Maria Harvey (mariajlharvey@gmail.com), by 15 September 2019, together with a short C.V. and a completed Participant Information form. 

Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract. 

All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations. 

CFP: International Meeting of the European Architectural History Network in Edinburgh in June 2020

Genius Loci: The Politics of Pre-Modern Architectural Style Session, International Meeting of the European Architectural History Network, Edinburgh, 10–13 June 2020

Frequently encountered in the historiography of pre-modern architecture is the theme of genius loci – a paradigm in which factors such as climate, local resources, and local traditions are understood as determinative for the building practices of a given region, country, or nation.

Writing on Gothic architecture is a striking case in point. The style was a pan-European phenomenon. Yet, almost from the beginning, it was interpreted in patently ethnic, regional, or national terms. Late medieval observers in northern Europe saw it as French (opus francigenum). Early modern observers in southern Europe saw it as German (maniera tedesca). And antiquarians, archaeologists, and architectural historians active during the era of the formation of modern nation states, in an effort to advance competing domestic claims to Gothic, coined a series of stylistic labels – ‘Perpendicular’ for England, ‘Flamboyant’ for France, ‘Sondergotik’ for Germany – that continue to be employed into the present day.

Thus have medieval architectural historians struggled to examine the buildings of smaller regions with more heterogeneous architectural traditions. Scotland – a land whose medieval edifices have been characterised as ‘dour’, ’embattled’, and even a ‘fag-end’ – is exemplary in this regard. Smaller buildings less sympathetic to foreign fashions have typically been viewed as crude. Larger buildings more sympathetic to foreign fashions have typically been viewed as mannered, wilful, or downright bizarre (cf. Roslin Chapel). Such interpretations not only uphold a simplistic centre-versus-periphery model of historical explanation but also assume that national styles are real ontic categories.

Raising the stakes for a re-evaluation of issues of place, space, and identity is the politically febrile atmosphere in which we now live and work. Indeed, nativism draws on the idea that countries have distinctive (if not inviolable) cultures, and architecture plays a dual role in such discourse in that old buildings can be used as evidence for certain values and new buildings can be used as vehicles for certain ideologies. Consequently, this panel seeks to interrogate the relationship between architecture and regional or national identities in the pre-modern period, with an emphasis on the buildings of medieval Scotland. Possible topics for papers include:

– Definitions of nationalism

– Investigations of ‘schools’, ‘groups’, and/or ‘styles’

– Attributions of buildings to various regional or national idioms

– Explorations of social networks that supported or subverted the exchange of architectural ideas

Please submit a proposal in English of no more than 300 words by 20 September 2019 to Zachary Stewart (zstewart@arch.tamu.edu) and Lizzie Swarbrick (Lizzie.Swarbrick@ed.ac.uk) with the following information:

– The title of the paper

– Your name

– Your professional affiliation

– A short curriculum vitae (maximum of two pages)

– A mailing address, email address and telephone number

Please note: papers may not have been previously published, nor presented in public. Only one submission per author will be accepted by EAHN 2020. Each speaker is expected to fund his or her own registration, travel and expenses to Edinburgh.

Conference: Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, St Andrews Uni, 13-14 September 2019

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place at the University of St Andrews on 13-14 September 2019, and is jointly held by the School of Art History, SAIMS and the University’s Special Collections Division. Please send all queries to medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Friday 13 September  [Venue: Napier Reading Room, Martyrs Kirk, North Street]

14:00 Emily Savage: word of welcome

14:15 Rachel Hart (University of St Andrews Library, Special Collections): “The surviving evidence of medieval collecting, curating and assembling to be found in the Library of the University of St Andrews”

15:00-16:00: Handling session in Special Collections with Rachel Hart

17:15: Keynote lecture: Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) [Venue: School 3 on the Quad]:

“History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in Church Collections, c. 800-1300”

18:30: Conference dinner [Venue TBA]

 

Saturday 14 Sept [Venue for all sessions: Parliament Hall, South Street]

8:30-9: Coffee

9:00-10:45 Morning session  1: Relics and reliquaries – Chair: Kate Rudy

Juliette Calvarin (Harvard University): “Afterlives of Funeral Palls in the Sacristy (St. Thomas’, Prague, c. 1410)”

Ashley West (Temple University): “Heiltumsbücher and Artistic Authority in an Early Visual Archive”

Sarina Kursteiner (Columbia University): “Notarial Acts as Sacred Matter: Bolognese Notaries and their Images in the Archive, 1290-1303”

10:45-11: Coffee and comfort break

11:00-12:45 Morning session  2: Treasuries – Chair: Emily Savage

Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto): “Reflecting a Golden Age: The Material Composition of History in the Treasuries of the Late Medieval Maasland”

Marta Simões & Joana Antunes (CEAACP-GEMA, University of Coimbra): “Reading the Space, Listing the Riches: The Old Cathedral of Coimbra and its Medieval Inventories”

Zachary Stewart (Texas A&M University): “The St Peter Mancroft Inventory: Register, Record, Teaching Resource”

12:45- 2:00 Lunch

14:00-15:45: Afternoon session 1: Manuscripts as Archives – Chair: Julian Luxford

Kathleen Wilson Ruffo (Royal Ontario Museum): “Curating Cultural Capital: A little-known Dutch Psalter as Diplomatic Archive”

Shannon Wearing (UCLA): “The ‘Eternal Memory of Great Things’: Illustrated Secular Cartularies of the Twelfth Century,from Bavaria to Barcelona”

Orly Amit (Tel Aviv University): “Appropriating the Archive: Promoting Legitimacy and Shaping Historical Memory through the Library of John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford”

15:45-16:00 Coffee and comfort break

16:00-17:45: Afternoon session 2: Storing the Archive  Chair: Rachel Hart

Diego Belmonte-Fernandez (Universidad de Sevilla): “Collecting, curating and remembering in the Cathedral of Seville: a portable written archive from the fifteenth century”

Rafael Ceballos-Roa & María del Carmen Rodríguez-López (Universidad de León): “The B-side of the parchment: two medieval monastic archives from the kingdom of León”

Amélie Marineau-Pelletier (University of Ottawa and École des hautes études en sciences sociales): “The Locus Credibilis and the Making of Urban Authority: Preserving the Written Word in Metz (14th-15th Centuries)”

Ending around 18:00

BAA Post-Graduate Conference – Saturday 23rd November 2019

Join us for the first British Archaeological Association Post-graduate Conference.

We are excited to present a diverse conference which includes postgraduates and early career researchers in the fields of medieval history of art, architecture, and archaeology.

The BAA postgraduate conference offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present their research and exchange ideas with fellow members of the BAA.

 

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

Conference Programme

9:30am – 9:50am – Registration

 

9:50am – 10:00am – Welcome

 

10:00am – 11:20am – Cultural imagination and Identity

Chair: Professor Sandy Heslop, University of East Anglia

Ryan Low (Harvard University)Seeing Identity in Crusader Colonial Ceramics

Netta Clavner (Birkbeck University of London)Defining Social Order: The Civic Scene of Medieval Bristol

Lily Hawker-Yates (Christ Church Canterbury University)Interpretations of Barrows in Later Medieval England

 

11:20am – 11:40am – Refreshment Break

 

11:40 am – 12:40pm – Landscape and Urban Space 

Chair: Dr Alexandra Gajewski, The Burlington Magazine/Institute of Historical Research, London

Dana Katz (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)The Lake Effect: An Environmental Case Study of Landscape Transformation at the Royal Parkland of La Favara in Medieval Sicily

Richard Nevell (University of Exeter)The Archaeology of Destruction in the Middle Ages

 

12:40pm -13:40pm – Lunch (provided)

 

13:45pm – 15:00pm – Iconography and Interpretation

Chair: Dr Emily Guerry, University of Kent

Dustin S. Aaron (Institute of Fine Arts, New York University)Revisiting the Meaning of Mouths on the Austro-Bavarian Frontier

Innocent Smith, op (Universität Regensburg)Representatio Representationis: Depictions of the Mass in 13th-century Missals

Muriel Araujo Lima (University of São Paulo)Sinful Nature: Creation Cycles, Moralizing Content and Figurative Exegesis in Medieval Bestiaries

 

15:00pm – 15:15pm – Refreshment Break

 

15:15pm – 16:15pm – Visualising the Cult of Saints

Chair: Professor Michael Michael, Research Fellow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow

Angela Websdale (University of Kent), The Cult of Saint Edward the Confessor and the Influence of Westminster Palace and Henry III’s Maison Dieu at Ospringe upon the Gothic Wall Paintings in Faversham

Katie Toussaint-Jackson (University of Kent)The Wall Paintings of Horsham St Faith and their Medieval Modifications

 

16:15pm – 16:30pm – Comfort Break

 

16:30pm – 17:45pm – Sculptures and Masons: Artistic agency, patronage and construction

Chair: John McNeill, Hon. Secretary, BAA

Aurora Corio (University of Genova)Lombard Sculptors in Western Tuscany at the heart of the Duecento: The case of St. Martino in Lucca

Teresa Martínez (Instituto de Historia, CCHS-CSIC/ University of Warwick)The petrification of Zamora: A specific answer to general questions about Construction and Society in the Middle Ages.

 

17:45pm – 18:00pm – Closing Remarks

 

NB: We will be providing a light lunch and refreshments to all attending. Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements: postgradconf@thebaa.org

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

New exhibition of historic photos of Notre-Dame in Paris

Notre-Dame, Paris, west front. Print by J. Coney, 1830

In response to the devastating Notre-Dame fire in April 2019, the Courtauld has published an online exhibition featuring 19th- and early 20th-century images of the cathedral taken from the Courtauld’s Conway Library.

Modern media gave the terrible fire at the cathedral of Notre-Dame of Paris a shocking immediacy. We watched it live on 24-hour television, and followed the unfolding story on social media. Now comes the slow process of stabilising and conserving the damaged building, and, more controversially, restoring and rebuilding. The magnificent and largely 13th-century wooden roof above the vault has gone, and the central spire built by Viollet-le-Duc in the 1850s collapsed dramatically into the flames. But most of the cathedral church, begun around 1160, finished by around 1330, and heavily restored by Viollet-le-Duc and Lassus in the mid-19th century, has survived surprisingly intact.

Images have been chosen that help to tell the story of the cathedral. Many of them are photographs taken in the 19th century, during the restoration of the cathedral by Viollet-le-Duc. We have included some prints made by English artists which show the cathedral before the restoration. Evocative images of the cathedral in its cityscape are found in photographs by a British tourist, taken around 1911, and by the great architectural photographer A. F. Kersting in the third quarter of the 20th century. The early post-war city captured by Kersting now seems almost as remote as that of 1911. Photographs from the Macmillan Commission recording war damage in Europe during the Second World War show the emotive power of the cathedral and its ability to survive.

The Conway Library at The Courtauld is a collection of approximately one million photographic and printed images of architecture, sculpture and medieval painting, founded by the journalist, mountaineer, politician and pioneering art historian, Martin Conway, Lord Conway of Allington. Conway began collecting images of works of art as a student in the 1880s, and bequeathed his collection to The Courtauld Institute of Art when it was founded in 1932. A project to provide a digitised version of the entire collection is currently underway and is made possible through a dedicated team of staff and volunteers.

See the exhibition here