Category Archives: Websites

Web Resource: Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources

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The Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources aims to document all given names recorded in European sources written between 500 and 1600. New editions are published quarterly.

Looking for a particular name? Browse the entries.

Wondering how to interpret an entry? See the guide.

Want to know more? Read about the project.

See: http://dmnes.org

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Free Online Course: The Book of Kells, Trinity College Dublin

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Trinity College Dublin is offering a new online course started 8 October. This course is intended for any and all interested in the history, crafting, and enduring legacy of one of the world’s most famous medieval manuscripts.

The Book of Kells manuscript, housed at Trinity College Dublin is world famous – it attracts almost one million visitors a year. But what can this book tell us about Irish history? And what significance is the manuscript in today’s world?

On this course you will use the Book of Kells as a window through which to explore the landscape, history, faith, theology, and politics of early medieval Ireland. You will also consider how the manuscript was made, its extended biography and how it has affected different areas of the contemporary world.

Please the visit the course’s website for more information.

Online Source for the oeuvre of Jan van Eyck

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Discover the oeuvre of Jan van Eyck online! The benchmark website closertovaneyck.kikirpa.be has been expanded with macro photos and scientific imagery of 20 works by Jan Van Eyck and his workshop from 11 renowned European museums. The zoom function invites you to enjoy and study the high resolution images in microscopic magnification and the split-screen function allows to compare different types of images of Van Eyck’s oeuvre, including the Ghent Altarpiece.

All images are available in open access and were made by the Imagery unit of the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA, Brussels) using state-of-the-art equipment and a standardized protocol.
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Exclusively Medieval, Online & Open Access: 2017 special issue of British Art Studies

The latest issue of British Art Studies (an open access, online Art History journal published by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art), is entirely devoted to Medieval Britain. The content is derived from a conference held at the British Museum in 2014: Invention and Imagination in British Art & Architecture, 600-1500.

It opens with an editorial by guest editors Sandy Heslop and Jessica Berenbeim, followed by twelve articles in traditional format: 

Thanks to the digital platform, it is possible to reference the articles to the nearest paragraph using the DOI link. The platform’s scope is further tested through the Conversation Piece and Handling Digital Objects portions of this special issue: 

Another innovative feature is a virtual simulation of the object sessions held at the 2014 conference. In actuality, these took the form of guided sessions with objects in the seminar rooms at the conference venue. In the journal, they are recreated via four interactive 3D models of objects, each accompanied by a short essay: 

Gothic Revival, Medieval Art & the Hereford Screen

Issue 5 of British Art Studies features a One Object study of the Gothic Revival Hereford Screen. The 8 tonne metalwork structure was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and manufactured by the firm of Francis Skidmore in 1862. The collection of essays fosters discussion of the screen’s medieval models as well as its Victorian genesis.

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The Hereford Screen in Hereford Cathedral, view from North Transept, 19th century. (Image from the V&A website)

As a new and exclusively digital journal, British Art Studies’ virtual platform is celebrated through abundant interplay of text, image and audio-visual material.  It brings together seven scholars who present technical and theoretical perspectives on a single object by means of ‘traditional’ essays and short films.  This brief blog-post aims to draw attention to the medieval content of the study, notwithstanding the overall interest and coherence of all the constituent articles.

The One Object discussion is introduced by Ayla Lepine, in an essay entitled Resurrection, Re-Imagination, Reconstruction:
New Viewpoints on the Hereford Screen.

 

Essays in the discussion that focus on medieval material are:

The Hereford Screen: A Prehistory, by medievalist Matthew Reeve, guides the reader through a history of the medieval predecessors of the Hereford screen and places its production in the context of the Cathedral space and the architect’s work at Lichfield and Salisbury.

Jacqueline Jung’s contribution, a video essay entitled, The Medieval Choir Screen in Sacred Space, considers the sight-lines and sculptural relationships created by the strategically designed perforations and interior figural programmes of medieval screens and their host churches, focusing on two examples from 13th-century Italy and 15th-century Germany.

The oddly fragile, contentious choir screen, in its many historical manifestations, receives a colourful and polyphonic tribute in this One Object study. As a medieval art blog, links to the most relevant essays are given above but are, for best results, to be enjoyed with their Gothic Revival companions.

Digital library of liturgical sources

Ecclesiastical Map of Western Europe in the Middle Ages

Ecclesiastical Map of Western Europe in the Middle Ages

Digital library of liturgical sources is a new research tool developed by the Research Group of Liturgical History. The Calendar-Project is a comprehensive database of almost 200 representative European liturgical Calendars and Sanctorals. Through browsing Saints and Feasts or Dates respectively, one can gain a statistically relevant sample of where, when and which feasts were celebrated within the medieval territory of the Roman Rite. Methodically, our research is based on the same principles as the whole of USUARIUM, namely that diverse sources based on their undoubted origin provide the best way to study the range of variability of liturgical Uses. Proofreading, corrections, new sources and facilities will follow in the coming weeks.

CONTACT FOR PASSWORD: foldvary.miklos[at]btk.elte.hu
 dr. Miklós Földváry, H-1088 Budapest,
Múzeum krt. 4/F. 222.