Category Archives: Uncategorized

Conference: Pilgrimage and the Senses, University of Oxford, 7 June 2019

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CFP: “Rethinking the Canon: Models, Categories and Prestige in Spanish Medieval Art”, 23–25 October 2019, Universidad Complutense, Madrid

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INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL, London

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow, 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

Jessica Barker, ‘Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal’, 26 March 2019, QMUL

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The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place on 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

Conference: Innovation in Stone: Medieval Stone Sculpture from the Van Horne Collection, Sam Fogg, London, April 26th, 2019

19155_detail.jpgA symposium to be held in conjunction with the exhibition ‘Innovation in Stone: Medieval Stone Sculpture from the Van Horne Collection’ at Sam Fogg (April 26th, 2019; 4:00 – 6:00 pm).

The exhibition presents stone sculpture, gathered together over several decades by the New York collectors Alexandra and Charles van Horne. Formerly occupying prominent places in other well-known collections, the works reflect van Horne’s fascination with objects that bear a resemblance to modern art of the early 20th century. There are the Romanesque ‘Picassos’, Celtic ‘Modiglianis’ and ancient ‘Henry Moores,’ and a wealth of research material that visualises the links between modernism and medieval art, which modernist artists themselves emphasised.

This emphasis is also reflected in the symposium, which examines stone sculpture from the 12th-century, a time when innovation and curiosity dominated the architectural and sculptural world. There was a tension with and an awareness of the classical past and an anticipation of change, which would be realised in the Gothic period, and it is within this dichotomy that the Van Horne collection is situated. The changes to architecture and sculpture in the 12th century allowed the art of the Middle Ages to let go of its grip on the ancient past and confidently look forward to its own distinctive style. The sculpted heads and architectural fragments, presented together publicly for the first time in the accompanying exhibition, originate in some of the most innovative and influential sites of 12th- and 13th-century Europe: Cluny, Toulouse, Paris, Parthenay. Having been separated from their context, they invite us to imagine the extraordinary sites in which they were invented, and the innovative sculptors who created them.

The lectures and discussions will be followed by a drinks reception and the opening of the exhibition in the gallery on Clifford Street.

PROGRAMME:

4:00 Introduction

4:10 Medieval Sculpture in Multiples: Illuminating Riddles for the Perplexed

(Charles Little, Metropolitan Museum of Art)

4:35 Focillon’s Jongleur or How to Define Creativity in Twelfth-Century Sculpture

(Alexandra Gajewski, Burlington Magazine)

5:00 Discussion

5:10 In-conversation with Charles van Horne

5:40 Discussion

5:50 Concluding Remarks and Introduction to the Show

6:00 Drinks Reception and Exhibition Opening in Clifford Street

Please register on EVENTBRITE. Contact jana@samfogg.com for any further questions.

Job: Teaching Fellow in Architectural History and Heritage, University of Edinburgh

1200px-university_of_edinburgh_ceremonial_roundel.svg_Teaching Fellow in Architectural History and Heritage
Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (ESALA)
Edinburgh College of Art

Closing Date: 5pm (GMT) on 15 March 2019

Click here for full details of this post and for the application form

Applications are invited for a fixed-term 0.7 FTE (24.5 hours per week) Teaching Fellowship in Architectural History and Heritage. The successful applicant will work within a long-established, leading programme in the history and theory of architecture, and will have expertise and experience in teaching architectural history in the contexts of architecture, history of art, and heritage studies to a high quality. You will have the skills to conceive effective and creative pedagogies and deliver these to support courses in the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in architectural history, theory, and heritage in the Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture [ESALA].

You will have good communication skills, augmented by a wide and deep knowledge of architectural history and its scholarly traditions. Applications that demonstrate established skillsets in the practical aspects of architectural history and heritage, including historic building analysis and assessment, surveying, digital capture, and CAD, are especially welcome. These will be evidenced by appropriate expertise and academic achievement, and through teaching and assessment experience. You will also be able to demonstrate the ability to develop innovative teaching in classroom (lecture and seminar/tutorial) and field-research environments, including the preparation of online teaching support resources for students.

You will have a PhD-level degree in architectural history or related discipline, and have the ability to collaborate with a collegiate group committed to delivering innovative pedagogy and critical thinking through our School’s position in the University’s Edinburgh College of Art.

The post is part-time (0.7 FTE), fixed-term for 3 years.

This position is tenable from 1 August 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter.

Salary Scale: Grade UE07, £33,199 – £39,609 per annum pro rata

 

Conference: Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art, The Courtauld Institute, London, 8 February 2019

image-1024x745The Courtauld Institute of Art 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium 

Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and scale in medieval art 

10:00–18:00 Friday 8 February 2019 (with registration from 9:30) 

Lecture Theatre 1, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, London WC1X 9EW 

Size mattered in medieval art. Whether building a grand gothic cathedral or carving a minute boxwood prayer bead, precisely how big to make it was a principal concern for medieval artists, their patrons, and audiences. 

Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. 

Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences. 

Left: North elevation (detail), Sainte Chapelle, Paris (1239-1248). Right: Reliquary of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien (Paris, 1261-1262) Musée nationale du Moyen Âge, Paris. 

In our age of viewing through digital surrogates, the Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium invites its speakers to consider new approaches to issues of size and relative scale in relation to the making, meanings, and study of medieval art. 

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research. 

Organised by Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art) and Oliver Mitchell (The Courtauld Institute of Art) with the generous support of Michael Carter and the Consortium for Arts and Humanities in South-East England.

Programme: Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and scale in medieval art 

9:30-10:00 Registration – Front hall 

10:00-10:10 Welcome – Teresa Lane & Oliver Mitchell (The Courtauld Institute of Art) 

SESSION 1: ARCHITECTURAL MINIATURES Chaired by Giosue Fabiano (The Courtauld Institute of Art) 

10:10-10:30 Sylvia Alvares-Correa (University of Oxford): The use of architecture in a 15th century panorama of the Passion of Christ in Jerusalem: structuring composition or ideology? 

10:30-10:50 Niko Munz (University of York): Architectural ventriloquism in pre-Eyckian panel painting 

10:50-11:10 Antonella Ventura (Independent scholar) Playing with scales: Relationships between monumental architectures and reliquary structures in Umbria and Apulia in the fourteenth century 

11:10-11:30 Discussion 

11:30-12:00 Tea & coffee break (Research Forum Seminar Room, Floor 2) 

SESSION 2: SCALE MODELS Chaired by Bella Radenovic (The Courtauld Institute of Art) 

12:00-12:20 Angela Websdale (University of Kent): Replication and Reproduction: Evoking the Cult of St Edward the Confessor and the Visual Culture of Westminster Abbey and Palace at St Mary’s Church, Faversham 

12:20-12:40 Francesco Capitummino (Independent scholar): The ambo of the Capella Palatina in Palermo, a reduced scale of the Cefalù prototype 

12:40-13:00 Discussion 

13:00-14:00 Lunch (provided for speakers and chairs – Seminar Room 9, Floor 2) 

SESSION 3: THE SCALE OF DEVOTION Chaired by Chloe Kellow (The Courtauld Institute of Art) 

14:00-14:20 Sheridan Zabel Rawlings (University of Manchester): Scale matters: The intentional use of size to depict Christ in John Rylands Library’s Latin MS 344 

14:20-14:40 Matko Marušić (University of Zagreb): Medieval crosses: Scale, typology, materials 

14:40-15:00 Harry Prance (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Miniature materials/ concrete connections: The spaces of Byzantine liturgical objects 

15:00-15:20 Discussion 

15:20-15:50 Tea & coffee break 

SESSION 4: AMPLIFICATION & DISSEMINATION Chaired by Laura Melin (The Courtauld Institute of Art) 

15:50-16:10 Charlotte Wytema (The Courtauld Institute of Art), From abstract idea to scaled-up image: The case of the Virgin with fifteen symbols 

16:10-16:30 Nicolas Flory (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Scaling Patronage in the Duchy of Burgundy: Isabella of Portugal and her Carthusian donations 

16:30-16:50 Discussion 

16:50-17:00 Closing remarks by Professor Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art) 

17:00 Reception With special thanks to Michael Carter for his generous support