Lecture: The Other Christians of the Late Medieval Mediterranean: Ethiopian Settlement and Exchange with Latin Europe, c. 1200-1550, 1st October 5:00pm (EST)

The Marco Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies (University of Tennessee, Knoxville) invites you to virtually attend the 17th annual Riggsby Lecture on Thursday, October 1 at 5:00pm EST. Samantha Kelly of Rutgers University will present, The Other Christians of the Late Medieval Mediterranean: Ethiopian Settlement and Exchange with Latin Europe, c. 1200-1550. Ethiopian ChristianContinue reading “Lecture: The Other Christians of the Late Medieval Mediterranean: Ethiopian Settlement and Exchange with Latin Europe, c. 1200-1550, 1st October 5:00pm (EST)”

Online Lecture: ‘The Impostor Sea: Fraud in the Medieval Mediterranean’ by Dr. Hussein Fancy, 29 September 2020, 5:30pm (EST)

The Center for Medieval Studies at Fordham University, New York City, sponsors many events throughout the year to encourage increased interest, knowledge, and study of the Middle Ages. In light of covid-19, their Fall 2020 lecture series is now virtual. Join the Center for its first virtual lecture of the semester on Tuesday, September 29Continue reading “Online Lecture: ‘The Impostor Sea: Fraud in the Medieval Mediterranean’ by Dr. Hussein Fancy, 29 September 2020, 5:30pm (EST)”

Online Lecture: ‘Byzantine Pieces of an Umayyad Puzzle: A Basalt Platform in the Azraq Oasis’, Dr Alexander Brey, 1 October 2020, 4:00–5:00pm (ET)

In this lecture, Dr. Alexander Brey, Wellesley College, will discuss an Umayyad-era basalt reservoir platform built within the Azraq oasis in eastern Jordan and places its carved interlocking stones in conservation with early Byzantine zodiac and celestial diagrams.

Recorded Webinar: Race, Racism, and Teaching the Middle Ages

On 20 July 2020, The Medieval Academy of America hosted the webinar Race, Racism, and Teaching in the Middle Ages. In the wake of recent events and ongoing racially motivated violence, there have been many institutional responses to raise awareness of race and racism in the U.S. and beyond. This webinar focused on pedagogy andContinue reading “Recorded Webinar: Race, Racism, and Teaching the Middle Ages”

Online Lecture: The Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue (Wednesday, 9 September, 2020, 12:30pm EST)

Tune in on Wednesday, 9 September at 12:30pm EST for a new lecture is the series Islam in Africa: Material Histories, sponsored by Silsila at New York University. Marina Rustow (Princeton University) will present The Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue. The lost archive of the Fatimid caliphate (909–1171) survived inContinue reading “Online Lecture: The Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue (Wednesday, 9 September, 2020, 12:30pm EST)”

Online Lecture: Hagia Sophia: The History of the Building and the Building in History, Dumbarton Oaks Webinar, 1 September 1 2020, 11–12:30 (EDT)

This webinar brings together scholars who have actively promoted research on the Hagia Sophia and will cover historical facts, Dumbarton Oaks’ involvement, and the issues related to the recent reconversion of the monument.

Online Lectures: British Archaeological Association sponsored panels for the IMC 2020

As the IMC 2020 could not take place this year, the British Archaeological Association has recorded their sponsored panels which you can now watch online. All papers are chaired by Dr Harriet Mahood.

Online Lectures: Church Conservation Trust, August-September 2020

All of the Church Conservation Trust lectures are all free to get involved with and are Livestreamed them via their Facebook page, this allows you to really engage with the talk and to submit your questions live. These lectures are recorded and will be available to watch afterward.

Online Lecture: ‘Cluny and Vézelay: The Paradox of the Romanesque Capital in Burgundy’, Professor Neil Stratford, CRSBI Annual Lecture 2020

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI)’s Annual Lecture 2020, given by Professor Neil Stratford, is now available to watch online. This an opportunity to hear his analysis of Romanesque capitals, using well-known Romanesque buildings as examples, developed over decades of careful study of the subject.