Category Archives: seminar

Lecture: Murray Seminar at Birkbeck, London (27 June 18)

Gold Against the Body: Gold Surfaces and Their Limits, Medieval to Early Modern

Alison Wright, UCL

5:00pm, 43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD

For the last Murray Seminar of the year, Alison Wright of UCL presents a paper entitled Gold against the Body:  gold surfaces and their limits, medieval to early modern. 

unnamedThe myth, famously invoked in Goldfinger, of the human body suffocated by being coated in gold exemplifies the fascination and danger attached to the idea of an ‘excess’ of gold, especially in respect to human skin. In this lecture the slippery boundaries of when, where and for whom gold surfaces might be deemed excessive will be explored in relation to European art, especially Italian, of the 14th to early 16th centuries. The discussion of gold in representation is generally dominated for this period by Alberti’s overturning of the value of gilding on the painted surface. This talk will argue rather for the multiple economies of gold in art with reference to broader visual and material traditions, and focus especially on gold’s complex relation to the human body.

Seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.

The Murray Seminar series will continue next autumn term.

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Murray Seminars at Birkbeck University, London (Summer Term 2018)

1 May, Cristina Guarnieri, University of Padua

The Stories of St. Lucy by Jacobello del Fiore, and Venetian folding reliquary altarpieces

The Stories of St. Lucy by Jacobello del Fiore are one of the masterpieces of Italian Late Gothic painting, but their function has been little understood. Re-evaluating prevailing theories about the panels’ purpose and display, this paper proposes that they formed a folding reliquary altarpiece, and considers other examples of this type which was once common in the Veneto.

 

5 June, Michelle O’Malley, the Warburg Institute

Botticelli: A conundrum of production

Two versions of Botticelli’s Virgin and Child with an Adoring Angel suggest raise fundamental questions about the specifics of authorship in the workshop and how we, as art historians, understand Renaissance artistic practice and construct attribution. This paper looks again at the technical evidence and the value of connoisseurship in tracking the development of the use of reproductive technique in late fifteenth-century Florence.

 

27 June, Alison Wright, UCL

Gold against the Body:  gold surfaces and their limits, medieval to early modern

The myth, famously invoked in Goldfinger, of the human body suffocated by being coated in gold exemplifies the fascination and danger attached to the idea of an ‘excess’ of gold, especially in respect to human skin. This paper explores the slippery boundaries of when, where and for whom gold surfaces might be deemed excessive in relation to European art, especially Italian, of the fourteenth to early sixteenth centuries.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

Lecture Emmanuele Lugli “Chasing Absence: The Body of Christ and the Measures to Enter in Touch with it” 17:00 13/02/2018 Birkbeck

Mensura Christi Talk
This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the ‘mensura Christi,’ or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its marginalization in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the ‘mensura Christi’ relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationships of measuring practices, visual belief, and religious orders, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.
 
All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

Summer Seminars in Paleography and Archival Studies

mediciJune 4 – July 7, 2018
Deadline: May 27, 2018

Summer Seminars in Paleography and Archival Studies

Session I: 4 – 9 June 2018 / Deadline: 27 May 2018
Session II: 25 – 30 June 2018 / Deadline: 18 June 2018
Session III: 2 – 7 July 2018 / Deadline:  25 June 2018

The Medici Archive Project is pleased to announce the dates for the upcoming 2018 Summer seminars in paleography and archival studies: Session I (4-9 June), Session II (25-30 June) and Session III (2-7 July).
The principal aim of this seminar is to provide an introduction to Italian archives (with particular emphasis on Florentine archival collections); to examine in-depth various documentary typologies; to read diverse early modern scripts; and to learn how to plan research in Italian archives and libraries. Especially relevant for graduate students, university faculty, and museum curators working on Renaissance and early modern topics, this seminar is taught by a team of current and former MAP scholars, as well as university professors and other MAP-affiliated researchers. Participating students will be taught at the MAP headquarters at Palazzo Alberti in Via de’ Benci 10.
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Seminar: Light made and light received: Architectural polychromy in northern France in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries

Timbert20photo-600x600Wednesday 14 February 2018
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Research Forum Seminar Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

Light in the Gothic period (twelfth and thirteenth centuries) has been the subject of numerous studies. These have drawn heavily on the writings of abbot Suger and focus particularly on stained glasses or liturgical objects. Aniconic polychromy is very rarely considered. This lecture will therefore explore the relationship between light and architectural polychromy. It will also consider the atmosphere and luminous identities generated by the use of local pigments.

 

Arnaud Timbert is Professor of Art History of the Middle Ages (University of Picardy Jules-Verne). He is a member of the Scientific Council of the International Stained Glass Center (CVMA). With the support of this institution, he sponsored a collective and interdisciplinary work on Chartres Cathedral (2014). He has also directed several works on materials and construction techniques (abbey church of Vézelay and Noyon cathedral) and restoration (castles of Pierrefonds and Pupetières). Whilst a fellow at the INHA (2015-2017) he also inaugurated a study of the historiography of architecture with a critical edition of the correspondence of Louis Grodecki (2018).

Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body

chirurgia.jpgThe Birkbeck Medieval Seminar is an annual event. It is free and open to all scholars of the Middle Ages. It is designed to foster conversation and debate on a particular topic within medieval studies by providing the opportunity to hear new research from experts in the field. We are a welcoming and inclusive environment. This venue is fully accessible. Please contact Isabel Davis (i.davis@bbk.ac.uk) for futher information or if you need help using the registration site.

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