Category Archives: Memberships and societies

Announcement: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

S.-Maria-gloriosa-dei-Frari-Title-page-1500-500.jpgWhat is the study of the church interior?

The church was a highly meaningful site for pre-Modern European society. As architectural sites accessible to all strata of society, church buildings provided contexts for interaction between social classes and genders, and settings for a wide variety of religious and non-religious activities. From an art-historical perspective, the vast majority of artworks produced in the medieval and Renaissance periods was intended for the many chapels, altars and screens in the church interior.

Yet, despite the obvious importance of these sites, the spatial dispositions of church interiors – and how they evolved over time – are still little-understood. Centuries of restorations and adaptations have radically transformed the appearance and usage of church interiors: screens have been removed; altars shifted position; new liturgical furnishings installed; fresco decoration whitewashed; and seating added or taken away.

Scholars studying the church interior seek to reconstruct the meaning, functions and visual appeal of these sacred spaces. The Society for the Study of the Church Interior seeks to promote this holistic and interdisciplinary approach to researching historic church buildings.

Who are we?

We are a group of scholars who are interested in the material culture, spatial dynamics and multifarious functions of the church interior in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We are mainly based in the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, but welcome members from around the world.

Primarily focused on pre-Modern Italy, we are interested in reconstructing aspects of individual churches, but also in broader issues associated with large-scale changes to architectural layouts generally associated with religious reform. In addition to purely art-historical inquiry, we investigate the religious, political or practical motivations behind transformation campaigns and the effects such changes had on the use of church buildings.

What do we do?

Studying the church interior presents complex challenges for the historian, given that documentary, archaeological and material sources can be fragmentary or even contradictory. Our research involves the analysis of several types of primary and secondary source material, which may include:

  • Original archival documentation such as payments, contracts, testaments, etc
  • Liturgical texts
  • Official records of Visitations conducted by bishops and other clergy
  • Historic ground plans
  • Antiquarian guidebooks
  • Modern restoration records
  • Material evidence of surviving architecture
  • Archaeological reports
  • Provenance of objects such as altarpieces and liturgical furnishings

What are the activities of the Society?

The Society promotes broader engagement with the study of the church interior, disseminates research findings and fosters an academic community of like-minded scholars.

In the future, we hope to organize sessions and meetings at major conferences such as the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting.

We are also in the process of establishing an online, collaborative database to collect data on the church interior. Initially concentrating on Italy, where the impact of the Counter Reformation was particularly strong, the database will reveal the broad patterns and chronologies which are currently beyond the grasp of the individual researcher. Members of the Society who wish to contribute to the database will receive a login to access it: please email Joanne or Michael if you are interested.

Sign up for the mailing list here.

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CFP: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017

logomaneyCall for Papers: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017
Deadline: Friday 23 rd September

After a successful outing to the Leeds IMC this summer where the BAA hosted two sessions, the BAA welcomes proposals for further BAA organised sessions next year (July 3 rd -6 th 2017). The IMC’s research theme for 2017 is “Otherness” which I think could be interpreted very successfully by the BAA’s members and relate well to research incorporating material culture.
“Other” could refer to those who are deemed to be other in society (strangers, foreigners, monsters); objects that are unusual, or out of the norm, and could therefore be considered as ‘other’; case studies that do not conform to type; and even topics concerning what is culturally “other” (such as artistic, architectural, and literature styles).
Approaches to this topic could include how “other” is encountered and responded to, or how ‘other’ can be defined and identified.

Suggested topics from the IMC include:
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
Full details of the IMC and their interpretation of ‘other’ and other topic suggestions can be found here:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125137/international_medieval_congress

It is hoped that the BAA can organise several sessions once again, with similar papers grouped together (either methodologically or by subject). Therefore if you do have any ideas about colleagues whose research would complement your own paper, please do include such comments along with your paper’s proposal.

How to Submit: Proposals should consist of a title, and short abstract (50-150 words). Please send paper proposals to hpmahood@gmail.com by Friday 23 rd September. If you have any questions, please do get in touch.

Application to join the ICMA Student Committee

Click here to apply to the ICMA Student Committee. The deadline for applications is April 1, 2016.

About the Student Committee

The Student Committee of the International Center for Medieval Art advocates for all members with student status and facilitates communication between both between ICMA student members and between student members and the ICMA. Our group annually sponsors at least two sessions at academic conferences, most frequently at the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, MI, and at the International Medieval Congress in Leeds, UK. As a committee that addresses the concerns of students, we see our sponsored sessions as forums for discussion and informal mentorship within our field. The Student Committee also contributes to the ICMA newsletter, which has recently been expanded to include submissions from all ICMA student members. Additionally, the Student Committee maintains various online presences in order to establish digital forums for student communication and to disseminate information regarding student conferences, sessions, and the ICMA Student Essay Prize.

Current Members (with end of term)

Jennifer Grayburn ’16 (Chair; University of Virginia)

Sanne Frequin ’17 (Vice-Chair, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands)

Lehti Keelman ’16 (Newsletter Chair & Conference Chair; University of Michigan)

Kyle Sweeney ’16 (Digital Presence Chair; Rice University)

Ashley Paolozzi ’18 (Membership Chair, Queen’s University, Canada)

Ashley Laverock ’16 (Emory University)

Pablo Ordás ’16 (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain)

Diana Olivares Martinez ’16 (University Complutense of Madrid, Spain)

Meg Bernstein ’18 (University of California, Los Angeles)

Join the ICMA Student Committee

Student Committee (hereafter SC) members are generally appointed for three-year terms, but actual appointments often range from 2-4 years based on the student status of the SC member. Prospective SC members apply by submitting a brief questionnaire explaining their interests and past experiences.  Official appointments are extended by the ICMA President and conclude in spring after the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS) in Kalamazoo.

At the annual SC Spring Meeting in Kalamazoo the Chair will go over the varied tasks for the upcoming year and will find agreement within the SC as to who will be responsible for each task. The responsibilities can be divided up however the group thinks best in order to best distribute the workload. Traditionally the tasks are divided as follows:

1) Chair

2) Public Relations (P.R.)

4) Newsletter

5) Digital Presence (D.P)

6) Events/Programs

History of the ICMA Student Committee

In spring 2005, a group of graduate students were recognized as a pilot committee – the Graduate Student Committee – aimed at advocating for and involving graduate student members within ICMA. In May 2008, Colum Hourihane (ICMA President 2008-2011) and Larry Nees (ICMA President 2011-2014) met with the ICMA Graduate Student Committee to announce that the GSC would be made an official ad hoc committee under its new designation, the Student Committee. The Student Committee mission widened from supporting graduate students to keeping all ICMA members informed about student statuses: graduates, undergraduates, interns, conservation trainees, etc. Along with its new designation, the Student Committee was asked to continue sponsoring annual sessions at Kalamazoo; to regularly submit an article to the ICMA newsletter; to participate in the development of the ICMA website; and to establish a listserv specifically geared to discussions regarding student opportunities, issues, and questions.

Contact Information

Jennifer Grayburn

ICMA Student Committee Chair

Ph.D. Candidate

History of Art and Architecture

McIntire Department of Art

University of Virginia

Email: studentcommittee@medievalart.org

Follow the ICMA Student Committee on Facebook.

BAA Study Day: Lincoln Cathedral Study Day ‘making and remaking’ (Lincoln, 6 October 2014)

Study Day:
BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 
Lincoln Cathedral Study Day ‘making and remaking’
Monday 6th October 2014, 10.15 – 16.30
Registration open until 19th September 2014 (limited spaces)

LINCOLN CATHEDRAL has for forty years had a full team of craftsmen, and has contributed to the training of workers at other cathedrals around the country. The ongoing programme of ‘making and remaking’ at Lincoln serves to inform our understanding not only of this particular building but also medieval architecture more widely.
Lincoln_Cathedral_(7435757570)Organised and led by cathedral archaeologist Professor Philip Dixon, this day school is an opportunity to visit the works department and talk to the masons, glaziers and carpenters of the works team, and see their daily work on the cathedral. In the afternoon Professor Dixon will lead a tour of the cathedral to look in detail at areas where the craftsmen’s work can be seen in situ alongside historic material.

The BAA is most grateful to Carol Heidschuster, manager of the works department, for generously hosting this study day. The cost of the day will be £20 for members. The event is free for students.

The cathedral is approx. 3/4 mile walk from Lincoln rail station; alternatively there is a taxi rank at the station. Coffee and biscuits will be provided on arrival at the cathedral works department, but participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch. The cathedral refectory will be open and serving hot and cold refreshments.

Please note: the afternoon session may involve stairs, heights, confined spaces and other potential hazards. Participants must take responsibility for their own safety at all times.

Places are limited to 20, of which 10 are reserved for students. To apply please e-mail Helen Lunnon – h.lunnon@uea.ac.uk by Friday 19th September, stating if you are a student. In the case of a greater number of applications being received than places available a ballot will be used. Successful candidates will be contacted by email on Monday 22nd September, with a request for payment.

Upcoming Events: British Archaeological Association Annual Lecture Series (London, Autumn 2014)

Upcoming events:
British Archaeological Association
Annual Lecture Series
London, Autumn 2014

lecture-hall-980x370

London meetings are held in the rooms of the Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE unless otherwise stated. Council meetings will precede the meetings on dates marked with an asterisk (*). Tea is served from 4.30pm and the Chair is taken at 5pm. Non-members are welcome to attend occasional lectures, please sign the visitors’ book on arrival. By reciprocal arrangement members of the Royal Archaeological Institute are invited to attend the lectures.

1 October 2014*
Friary biographies, urban fabric and the excavation legacy in England and Wales
Deirdre O’Sullivan, School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester

The lecture will be preceded by the Association’s Annual General Meeting. It will be followed by a reception to launch the latest publication in the BAA Conference Transactions series – Medieval Art, Architecture and Archaeology in Cracow and Lesser Poland.

5 November 2014
Please note: Teas will be served and the meeting will take place at the Linnean Society in Burlington House

Reginald Tayolor essay medal lecture
The Function and Iconography of the Minstrels’ Gallery at Exeter Cathedral
Dr Gabriel Byng, Cathedral and Church Buildings Division, Church of England

3 December 2014*
‘Barbarous rude things.’ Paintings in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries of London: some new observations
Bernard Nurse FSA, Dr Pamela Tudor-Craig FSA and Dr Jill A Franklin FSA

See also http://thebaa.org/meetings-events/lectures/annual-lecture-series/

CFP: Mediterranean Studies Association (Athens, May 27-30, 2015)

Call for Papers:
Eighteenth Annual International Congress of the Mediterranean Studies
University of Athens, 27-30 May 2015)
1 February 2015

parathThe Eighteenth Annual International Congress of the Mediterranean Studies Association will be held on May 27-30, 2015, at the School of Theology, University of Athens, in Athens, Greece. Proposals are now being solicited for individual paper presentations, panel discussions, and complete sessions on all subjects related to the Mediterranean region and Mediterranean cultures around the world from all historical periods. The official languages of the Congress are English and Greek. But complete sessions in any Mediterranean language are welcome.

Following an optional walking tour of Athens, the Congress will open with a plenary session and reception on the evening of Wednesday, May 27. Over the next three days, 150-200 scholarly papers will be delivered before an international audience of scholars, academics, and experts in a wide range of fields. A number of special events are being planned for Congress participants that will highlight the unique cultural aspects of Athens.

Sponsors of the congress include the Mediterranean Studies Association, the University of Athens, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, University of Kansas, Utah State University, and the Institute for Mediterranean Studies, Busan University of Foreign Studies, Korea.

Guidelines for Submission of Proposals

1. You may submit a proposal for an individual paper presentation, a complete session, or a round table panel on any Mediterranean topic and theme. The typical session will include 3 or 4 papers, each lasting twenty minutes, a chair, and (optionally) a commentator. (For examples of paper, roundtable panels, and session topics, and the range of subjects, see the programs from previous congresses.)

2. Submit a 150-word abstract in English for each paper, and a one-page CV for each participant, including chairs and commentators, as well as each participant’s name, email, regular address, and phone number. Proposals for complete sessions or roundtables need to include the chair’s name. Only ONE paper proposal per person will be accepted.

3. Deadline: The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2015. We will, however, continue to accept late submissions on a case by case basis after this deadline.

4. If you are giving your paper in a language other than English, please let us know and give us the title of your paper in that language as well as in English.

5. The MSA does not allow papers to be read in absentia.

6. Proposals for papers and/or sessions must be submitted through the MSA website: https://www.mediterraneanstudies.org/

Membership and Congress Registration: All accepted participants must be 2015 members of the MSA as well as register for the Congress no later than February 1, 2015. Late registrations will be available until March 31, 2015. Please be advised that those who have not registered by April 1, 2015, will be removed from the program.

Publications: After the congress, you are encouraged to submit your revised, expanded paper for consideration for publication in the Association’s double-blind, peer-reviewed journal, Mediterranean Studies, published by Penn State University Press.

If you have questions, please contact Ben and Louise Taggie at medstudiesassn@umassd.edu, and Geraldo Sousa at Sousa@ku.edu

Postdoctoral Fellowship: The Columbia Society of Fellows in the Humanities (2015-16)

Postdoctoral Fellowship:
The Columbia Society of Fellows in the Humanities
Deadline: 6 October 2014 (postmark)

The Columbia Society of Fellows in the Humanities, with grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the William R. Kenan Trust, will appoint a number of postdoctoral fellows in the humanities for the academic year 2015-2016. We invite applications from qualified candidates who have received their PhD between 1 January 2013 and 1 July 2015. Fellows are appointed as Lecturers in appropriate departments at Columbia University and as Postdoctoral Research Fellows. The fellowship is renewable for a second and third year.
columbiaIn the first year, Fellows teach one course per semester. At least one of these courses will be in the undergraduate general education program: Contemporary Civilization, Literature Humanities, Music Humanities, Art Humanities, Asian Civilizations, Asian Humanities, or Global Cultures, including those of Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. For more information on Columbia’s Core Curriculum please visit www.college.columbia.edu/core/.

The second course may be a departmental course, the design of which will be determined jointly by the Fellow and the Fellow’s academic department. In the second year, Fellows teach one course: either a Core course (if only one of the two first-year courses was in the Core) or a departmental course. This will leave one semester in the second year free of teaching responsibilities. In the third year, Fellows again teach one course, either a Core course or a departmental course (to be decided jointly by the Fellow and the Fellow’s department), leaving one semester again free of teaching responsibilities. Please note that all teaching—whether a Core class or a department one—is to be arranged by the Fellow through the Fellow’s home academic department. Please also note that at least two of the three courses taught in the first two Fellowship years must be in the Core.

In addition to teaching and research, the duties of Fellows include attendance at the Society’s lectures and events as well as active participation in the intellectual life of the Society and of the department with which the Fellow is affiliated. The annual stipend will be $61,000. Each Fellow will also receive a research allowance of $6,000 per annum.

For information on how to apply, please visit the society’s website.