Category Archives: Current Events

TODAY: Leeds IMC, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland, Session 703

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland will be running its first conference session this year at the Leeds International Medieval Congress.

Session 703 – Tuesday 4 July 2017 – 14.15 to 15.45

The following papers will be delivered:

Ron Baxter (Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture and the Medieval Workshop (paper 703-a);

James King (The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Romanesque Sculpture of Dunfermline Abbey and Its Influence: Evidence and Some Questions (paper 703-b);

Agata Gomółka (Department of Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia) – Carving Romanesque Bodies (paper 703-a).

Abtstract

Romanesque art and architecture was transnational in a European context.
The architectural sculpture produced in the British Isles and Ireland during the late
11th and 12th centuries demonstrates the visceral connection between these off-
shore islands and mainland Europe at that time. In its inaugural session at the IMC,
the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI) is seen to reveal
some of the ways in which its searchable and fully illustrated database enables art
historians to build an understanding of Romanesque stone carving by identifying
authorship, tracing the diffusion of carved ornament, recreating workshop practice,
and reimagining aesthetic criteria. Launched in 1987 by Professor George Zarnecki
with British Academy support and now affiliated also to King’s College London, the
CRSBI is an Open Access website comprising illustrated records of the Romanesque
sculpture at some five thousand sites in Britain and Ireland.
Advertisements

6th June 2017, Public Lecture with Prof Paul Binski: Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality

All are welcome to this free event at the Clagett Auditorium, Canterbury Cathedral Lodge. It will be held on Tuesday the 6th of June from 18.30-19.30.

Professor Paul Binski, from the University of Cambridge, will be exploring Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality.

Further details can be found in the accompanying poster:

image1

New Exhibition and Events: Opus Anglicanum, Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery, V&A Museum, 1 October 2016 – 5 February 2017

opus anglicanum to deleteNew Exhibition: Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1 October 2016 – 5 February 2017

From the 12th to the 15th centuries, England enjoyed an international reputation for the quality of its luxury embroideries, and were frequently referred to as ‘Opus Anglicanum’ (English work). Often featuring complex imagery, and ambitious in their scale and intricacy, they were sought after by kings, queens, popes and cardinals across Europe. This exhibition is the first opportunity in over half a century to see an outstanding range of surviving examples in one place. Paintings, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork and stained glass will be shown alongside, to explore the world within which these exquisite works were created.

Luxury embroideries were made by professional craftsmen and women living in the City of London, some of whom we can still identify by name. London was a hub for commerce, and the embroiderers formed part of an international mercantile network. The rare survivals of this extraordinary period of English art are today scattered across Europe and North America. Some of the embroideries have not been seen in Britain since they were produced.

Book now: vam.ac.uk/opus


 

lossy-page1-1024px-web2c_grevens_sc3a4ngkammare-_detalj2c_grevens_sc3a4ng_-_skoklosters_slott_-_88043-tifEnglish Medieval Embroidery Unpicked, day course, The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Lecture Theatre @V&A Museum, Saturday 12 November 2016

STUDY DAY: This study day explores the world of England’s Medieval luxury embroideries, known as Opus Anglicanum. We will examine their materials, techniques and design; the patrons and artists involved; and the extraordinary images depicted on them.

During the later Middle Ages, England enjoyed an international reputation for its luxury embroideries, produced for Europe’s greatest patrons including kings, queens, cardinals and popes. This study day will put embroideries in the exhibition Opus Anglicanum: Masters of Medieval Embroidery under the microscope, examining their materials, techniques and design; the patrons and artists involved; and exploring the extraordinary images depicted on them. Leading experts in the field will discuss these questions in what promises to be a fascinating afternoon.

With exhibition curators Glyn Davies and Sally Dormer.

14.00 – 16.30, Saturday 12 November 2016

£35 full, £30 concessions, £15 students


 20160719161621_170Opus Anglicanum: An Introduction to Silk & Gold Embroidery, Workshop, Art Studio @V&A Museum, Saturday 12 November, 10.30 – 16.30

WORKSHOP: Learn the secrets behind the beautiful embroidery techniques of Opus Anglicanum as seen in this exhibition. Sarah will guide you step by step through split stitch fillings, surface couching and underside couching with gold threads on an Opus Anglicanum inspired piece of your own, in this one day introduction to medieval embroidery. All materials included.

Saturday 12 November, 10.30 – 16.30

£92.00, £73.60 concessions

(Lead Image: The Steeple Aston Cope 1330-40 (detail). The Rector and Churchwardens of St Peter and St Paul, Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire. On long term loan to the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.)

Lecture: The Arts & Science in Early Islamic Spain (15 June, Courtauld Institute of Art)

image001-600x600

Wednesday 15 June 20163:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Research Forum Seminar Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

There is a symbiotic relationship between design, art and visual culture, and the exact sciences, which is attested in early scientific objects from al-Andalus and in medieval Arabic texts. In this talk I explore the objects, spaces, and figures that illuminate this relationship, focusing on ‘Abbas Ibn Firnas (d. ca. 887), the celebrated polymath of the Cordoban Umayyad court, and on al-Andalus and its contemporaries between the 9th-11th centuries.

Glaire D. Anderson is a historian of Islamic art of the caliphal period, with a focus on the art and court culture of Umayyad Cordoba. She is the author of The Villa in Early Islamic Iberia (Ashgate, 2013), co-editor with Mariam Rosser-Owen of Revisiting al-Andalus (Brill, 2007), and recent articles on the Islamic west in architectural history, women and the arts of Cordoba, and material culture and caliphal sovereignty.

http://courtauld.ac.uk/event/the-arts-science-in-early-islamic-spain

Upcoming Event: London Medieval Society Meeting- Forging Ahead (November 14, 2015)

scan0006The first London Medieval Society Colloquium of the new academic year welcomes Dr Alfred Hiatt as the Society’s new President. To celebrate the program explores themes central to his research: – Medieval Forgeries, Medieval Maps, Places and Spaces

Speakers are:

Catherine Delano-Smith on understanding medieval maps;

Leonie Hicks on medieval voyaging;

Marianne O’Doherty on medieval ideas of the Indian Ocean;

Yossef Rapoport on Islamic cartography;and

Lawrence Warner on medieval forgers and Piers Plowman

Members attend free; non-members are also very welcome to attend. Please see website for membership details – you may pay your temporary or annual membership on the day (£10/5 concessions per colloquia: it is £20/10 for annual membership: there are three events each year).

The event will be held in the beautiful Charterhouse Square (nearest Tube: Barbican)

WHEN
Saturday, 14 November 2015 from 11:00 to 18:00 
WHERE
Lecture Theatre – Joseph Rotblat Building, Charterhouse Square. London EC1M 6BQ GB – View Map

Lecture Series: Robert Branner Forum for Medieval Art, Columbia University

Robert-BrannerRobert Branner (1927-1973) was an art historian specializing in Gothic architecture and manuscript illumination. Active as an excavator, he made important discoveries in the chronology and style of French cathedrals, incorporating cultural historical tools into the method of design analysis that had more traditionally dominated architectural history.

Branner is remembered through the Robert Branner Forum, a student-run symposium sponsoring lectures several times a year that are open to the public. The Forum originated as a series of visiting lectures organized by Branner’s graduate students immediately after his death during the academic year as a way of continuing his courses. It has been supported by his family since that time.

Spring 2016

Professor Ittai Weinryb
“Bronze and Conversion”
Monday, January 25, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Professor Sonja Drimmer
“A City Full of Walls You Can Post Complaints at”
Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Professor Benjamin Anderson
“Monument and Narrative in Medieval Constantinople”
Friday, April 28, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

All events take place in Schermerhorn Hall, room 612.

Learn more about the Branner Forum here.

Wymondham Abbey: Medieval Architectural Design Uncovered

Fellow Roland Harris reported to Salon, the Society of Antiquaries newsletter, about the following discovery from Wymondham Abbey. Current work there, for construction of new buildings at the east end of the church, has been accompanied by excavation and building recording. As anticipated this has revealed more of the plan and detail of the Norman Benedictine priory (founded as a cell of St Albans in 1107), and a few tantalizing details of an earlier church: the origins of Wymondham Abbey probably lie in a Saxon minster on the site. More unexpected has been the sheer quantity of Gothic architectural mouldings recovered from the excavation and from above ground, which is providing new insight into the later development of the medieval priory. The most substantial quantity of worked stone has come from the unblocking of the former opening from the 12th-century nave north aisle into the north transept. More exciting still, this unblocking has revealed a substantial incised architectural design on the newly exposed respond (also forming the rear of the north-western 12th-century crossing pier).

The incised design measures 1.9m x 1.3m and is a scale drawing for a gable and window tracery. The design is largely complete, with gaps in the lines mostly due to surviving patches of later medieval paint, and includes various setting-out lines, circles and points (see the images below).

unnamed (1) unnamed

The significance of the discovery is threefold. First, the completeness of the design is remarkable—indeed, rather more complete than well-known examples such as those in the Galilee Porch at Ely Cathedral, the Roslin chapel crypt, and Christchurch Priory. Second, the design does not relate to surviving Gothic additions to Wymondham Abbey and, therefore, almost certainly relates to the monastic buildings or, much more probably, the eastern arm of the abbey church, demolished at the Dissolution: as such, it provides an important insight into the lost parts of the building. Third, and more tentatively, the combination of elements suggests a date before the end of the 13th century and raises the question as to whether—like its sister cell at Binham Priory with its precocious west front design of c.1240—Wymondham was at the forefront of bar tracery design in England in the mid-13th century.

Please note that the incised design is not accessible at present, as it is in the middle of a construction site, but visitors will be able to see it from the new room on the site of the medieval St Margaret’s chapel when this opens in the autumn of 2015.

Text taken from Salon, the Society of Antiquaries newsletter. Sign up here.