Category Archives: Conference

Conference: New Dialogues in Art History, The Warburg Institute, London, September 26, 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f472296712f2640004419952f12foriginalThis one day conference brings together the next generation of art history scholars to present and discuss their ongoing research. Papers will predominately focus on Italian and Northern Renaissance Art (c. 1400–1600) and will encompass diverse media including tapestry, painting, engraving and stained glass. The conference will comprise five sessions. In the first four, two PhD students (or recent graduates) will present on topics that are united by common themes such as patronage, attribution and materiality. The final session, entitled ‘Opening New Dialogues’, will feature a paper by Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director and former PhD student at The Warburg). In order to foster the intellectual exchange central to ‘New Dialogues in Art History’ , the key paper(s) of each session will be followed by 20 minutes discussion.

Organised by Genevieve Verdigel & Lydia Goodson. Please direct any enquiries to the organisers at: NewArtDialogues@gmail.com

Programme

10:00–10:15: Registration

10:15–10:30: Introduction: Lydia Goodson and Genevieve Verdigel

10:30–11:30: Session 1: Making and Materiality
Chair: Alexander Röstel (Courtauld Institute / The National Gallery)
– Ang Li (University of Oxford): ‘The Revival of Gold Ground in Late Fifteenth-Century Italian Paintings.’
– Benedetta Pacini (University of Warwick/ The National Gallery): ‘Making and Moving Venetian Renaissance Paintings: my interviews with chief restorers in Venice and London, and archival records about Tintoretto’s transport strategy.’

11:30–11:45: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

11:45–12:45: Session 2: Attribution and Authorship
Chair: Dr Olenka Horbatsch (British Museum; PhD 2017, University of Toronto)
– James Wehn (Case Western Reserve University/ The Cleveland Museum of Art): ‘The Maker’s Image: Israhel van Meckenem, His Name, and His Copies.’
– Catherine Spirit (University of York): ‘Weaving Light: Untangling Authorship in the Windows of All Saints Church, Earsham.’

12:45–13:45: Lunch (Provided for Speakers and Chairs)

13:45–14:45: Session 3: Prestige and Patronage
Chair: Adriana Concin (Courtauld Institute)
– Dr Ilaria Taddeo (PhD 2017, IMT School for Advanced Studies, Lucca): ‘Artistic Patronage, Family Prestige and Religious Politics. The case of the Guidiccioni between Lucca and Rome (c. 1530-1550).’
– Anne-Sophie Laruelle (University of Liège): ‘Reconsidering Tapestry Patronage and Trade in the Renaissance.’

14:45–15:00: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

15:00–16:00: Session 4: Itinerancy and Interchange
Chair: Lois Haines (Warburg Institute / The National Gallery)
– Giulio Dalvit (Courtauld Institute): ‘Circulation of Drawings in Castiglione Olona: Masolino, Paolo Schiavo, Vecchietta, Domenico Veneziano and Cyriacus of Ancona.’
– Matthew Whyte (University College, Cork): ‘Stylistic Exchange and Civic Identity in Michelangelo’s work on the Arca di San Domenico in Bologna.’

16:05–16:55: Session 5: Opening New Dialogues
– Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director, Warburg Institute): ‘The Specifics of Authorship: Attributing Production.’

16:55–17:00: Concluding Remarks
17:00–18:00: Reception

Free and Open to all. Advanced booking required via Eventbrite.

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Conference: Heritage Revisited. Rediscovering Objects from Islamic Lands in Enlightenment Europe, Kunsthistorisches Institut, University of Vienna, September 20–21, 2018

0For centuries, objects from Islamic lands were unquestioned parts of the material and visual culture of pre-modern Latinate Europe. A textile from Fatimid Egypt, for instance, the so-called “Veil of Sainte Anne”, was kept in the cathedral treasury of Apt and venerated as a Christian relic.

The workshop “Heritage Revisited. Rediscovering Objects from Islamic Lands in Enlightenment Europe” is dedicated to the long eighteenth century, a period in which, so we believe, an important shift in the perception of such objects took place. Islamic provenances were rediscovered, objects were studied, drawn and discussed. Finally, they were subjected to the classificatory scheme of European modernity, which leaves little space for conceptions of a historically entangled heritage.

Object case-studies shed light on the networks of scholars and institutions involved in the rediscoveries and will be framed in the discussions within broader discourses on (European) cultural heritage. Ultimately, we wish to offer new perspectives on the history of scholarship, notably Islamic art history, but also on perceptions of cultural belonging, of “Europeanness” and “Otherness”, which deeply resonate with current societal concerns.

Registration deadline: Sep 15, 2018. Register by emailing mattia.guidetti@univie.ac.uk

Programme 
Thursday, 20th September 2018
Dom Museum Wien
Stephansplatz 6, 1010 Wien

10:00-11:30
Visit to the Dom Museum Wien
With Gregor Pirgie, Universität Wien; Pia Razenberger, Tabadul Project; Markus Ritter, Universität Wien.

Places for the visit are limited. Please register until 15th September 2018 – mattia.guidetti@univie.ac.uk

Universität Wien – Institut für Kunstgeschichte,
Universitätscampus Hof 9, Seminar Room 1
Garnisongasse 13, 1090 Wien

13:30-14:00
Welcome and Introduction
Isabelle Dolezalek, Technische Universität Berlin/SFB “Episteme in Bewegung” Freie Universität Berlin and Mattia Guidetti, Universität Wien.

“Collections”
Chair: Ebba Koch, Universität Wien

14:00-14:40
Elisabeth Rodini, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore: The Redaldi Inventory: a Prologue to Enlightenment Collecting

14:40-15:20
Federica Gigante, Ashmolean Museum Oxford: Objects of a “Certain Antiquity” and the Quest for their Cultural Context

Coffee

“Rediscovering Objects from Islamic Lands”
Chair: Barbara Karl, Textilmuseum St. Gallen

15:50-16:30
Claire Dillon, Columbia University New York: The Many Dimensions of a Work of Art: the Mantle of Roger II as a Case Study in Imperial Representation, Origin Stories, and the Formation of Specific Others

16:30-17:10
Michelina di Cesare, Sapienza Università di Roma: Four Eleventh and Twelfth-century Islamic Tombstones Discovered in Pozzuoli in the Seventeenth Century
Coffee (20 min.)

17:30-18:10
Carine Juvin, Musée du Louvre Paris: The “Baptistère de Saint-Louis” through the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: the Making of a “Historical Monument”

18:10-18:50
Anna Contadini, School of African and Oriental Studies London: Changing Perceptions of the Pisa Griffin and Other Objects

Dinner

Friday, 21st September 2018
Universität Wien – Institut für Kunstgeschichte,
Universitätscampus Hof 9, Seminar Room 1
Garnisongasse 13, 1090 Wien

“Protagonists of the Rediscoveries”
Chair: Johannes Wieninger, MAK Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst Wien

9:30-10:10
Mattia Guidetti, Universität Wien: Reading Ottoman Flags in the Marches Region, 1684-1838

10:10-10:50
Markus Ritter, Universität Wien: A Documentary Encounter with Medieval (Islamic) Art in Eighteenth-century Vienna

10:50-11:30
Tobias Mörike, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg: Knowledge-brokers and Object-interpreters: Maronite Christians and the Redefinition of “Islamicate Objects” by the 1800s

Coffee

Discussion Tables
Chair: Isabelle Dolezalek, TU / FU, Berlin

12:00-12:40
Table I (Seminar Room 1)
Isabelle Dolezalek, TU / FU, Berlin: On the Concept of Cultural Heritage: what is European and what is not?

Table II (Seminar Room 2)
Tobias Mörike, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg: Art Market Networks and their Role in Constituting “Islamic Art” Objects

Table III (Seminar Room 3)
Barbara Karl, Textilmuseum St. Gallen: Object Biographies and Dynamics of Collecting

12:45-13:30 (Seminar Room 1)
Plenum discussion

Lunch

“Classifiying, Framing, Exhibiting”
Chair: Markus Ritter, Universität Wien

14:30-15:10
Sabine Du Crest, Université de Bordeaux: Islamic Border Objects in Seventeenth-century Europe

15:10-15:50
Gül Kale, Mc Gill University Montreal: Image as Text. Fischer von Erlach’s Take on Guillaume Grelot’s Drawings of Islamic Monuments in the Eighteenth Century

15:50-16:30
Ebba Koch, Universität Wien: Mughal Miniatures at Habsburg Vienna

Final Discussion

—-

Workshop conceived by Dr. Isabelle Dolezalek (Technische Universität Berlin, SFB “Episteme in Bewegung” Freie Universität Berlin) and Dr. Mattia Guidetti (Universität Wien)

Conference: The Right Moment. A Symposium on Kairotic Energies, Brussels, 18-19 October 2018

church-of-the-holy-nativity-631The Greek term kairós expresses an idea of ‘grasping the right moment’, which travelled through art, literature, and philosophy. And even today, it is central to debates over, for example, time management. Combining perspectives from classical reception studies and iconology, this ongoing project at KU Leuven (2017-2021) is about the reception of kairós in the visual medium from antiquity to the Renaissance. How was the notion of kairós visualized in images throughout time, from antiquity to the early modern era? And more specifically, how did text and image work together to transform the notion of kairós in various contexts?

The attending speakers from Belgium, Germany, France, Israel, Croatia, The Netherlands, Romania, The United Kingdom, The United States, and Switzerland have not only been selected on the basis of their interdisciplinary skills in the field; but equally because of their distinctive contribution to the method of iconology and visual anthropology.

Many among them are key influencers on, among other things, the importance of the Humanities in terms of peace process work, ecology, and the relationship between Eastern and Western civilizations.

Barbara Baert – Kunstwetenschappen KU Leuven – www.illuminare.be

PROGRAM

Thursday, 18 October

08.30-09.00 Registration

09.00-09.15 Welcome speech by Pierre Van Moerbeke,
Executive director of Francqui Foundation

09.15-09.30 Welcome speech by Luc Sels, Rector of KU
Leuven

09.30-10.00 Introduction by Barbara Baert

10.00-10.30 Coffee break

Part I
10.30-11.30 Giotto, the Eye and the Gaze – Victor Stoichita
Respondent: Herman Parret

11.30-12.30 Time in the Context of Ecclesia/Synagoga – Miri Rubin
Respondent: Inigo Bocken

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part II
14.00-15.00 Epochal Madness: Notes on the Present Moment – W. J. T. Mitchell
Respondent: Stéphane Symons

15.00-16.00 The Manic Moment – Davide Stimilli
Respondent: Hedwig Schwall

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 The Silence of Lifta – Avinoam Shalem
Respondent: Amr Ryad

17.30-18.15 Presentation of the new series Recollection: Experimental Reflections on Texts, Images and Ideas – Veerle De Laet (Leuven University Press) & Ellen Harlizius-Klück

Friday 19 October

08.30-09.00 Welcome & coffee

Part III
09.00-10.00 The Nativity Church in Bethlehem as Kairotic
Space – Bianca Kühnel
Respondent: Marina Vicelja-Matijašic

10.00-11.00 L’occasion de la grâce dans le martyre – Pierre Antoine Fabre
Respondent: Ralph Dekoninck

11.00-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.30 A Dialogue of Early Buddhism, Hinduism and
Jainism on the Varieties of Auspicious Moments – Eugen Ciurtin
Respondent: Reimund Bieringer

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part IV
14.00-15.00 Generating Synchronicity: Bodily and Affective
Techniques – Elisabeth Hsu
Respondent: Philippe Van Cauteren

15.00-16.00 The Moment of the Dangerous Women – Catherine Harper
Respondent: Ann-Sophie Lehmann

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 Concluding remarks – Han Lamers & Bart Verschaffel

17.30-18.00 Book presentations: Paul Peeters (Peeters Publishers) & Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art

18.00-19.30 Farewell drinks

Contact and registration: stephanie.heremans@kuleuven.be
Registration deadline: 30 September 2018

CFP: “A Global Trecento: Objects, Artist, and Ideas Across Europe, the Mediterranean, and Beyond,” IMC Leeds, 2019 (Deadline 15 September 2018)

Looking at the Trecento through the lens of current global paradigms and concerns inmarco polo historical and art historical studies might seem hazardous, or even paradoxical and provocative at best. Very few other labels have the power to evoke both the glories, achievements and limitations of traditional ‘Western’, and namely Eurocentric, art history. As a matter of fact, using the Italian word Trecento to mean the ‘Fourteenth Century’ in the visual arts, music and potentially any area of human endeavour adumbrates a clear hierarchy–with Italy at its top. It is meaningful, and perhaps no coincidence, that the term Trecento came into use in English in the same years that mark the tumultuous expansion of the new discipline of art history in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and its usage has grown exponentially ever since. While much has been done in recent decades to broaden our understanding of the period both geographically and philosophically, the Trecento remains primarily the century of Giotto and of the great Tuscan painters and sculptors. At this time of building national ‘walls’, it seems particularly appropriate to think that the seminal and transformative character of the Trecento owes much to artistic and cultural exchanges, movement of artists and patrons, circulation of models and ideas across Italy, Europe, the Mediterranean and beyond. Our aim is to bring into conversation recent research on these issues.

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Conf.: The Palace Unveiled The Royal Palace in Palermo and other centres of power in the medieval Mediterranean

Assamblea regionale siciliana and Fondazione Federico II announce
International Conference
The Palace Unveiled
The Royal Palace in Palermo and other centres of power in the medieval Mediterranean

 
 and the
Arabo-Norman Cultural Week
 Palermo, Palazzo Reale
 
26 June – 1 July 2018
 
 Maria Andaloro Jeremy Johns Ruggero Longo William Tronzo

C15th Century Conference Programme and Registration Details

The 39th Fifteenth Century Conference will be held at the University of Reading
Thursday 6th September to Saturday 8th September
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This year’s conference will be held at the University of Reading’s ICMA Centre from Thursday 6th September to Saturday 8th September. We have a very exciting programme including sessions covering a wide range of late medieval themes, from political to art-historical; and plenary lectures from Chris Briggs, Anne Curry, Chris Given-Wilson and Elizabeth New. We will also be celebrating the fifteenth volume of The Fifteenth Century at a reception jointly hosted by Boydell & Brewer and the ICMA Centre.

Friday will include a tour of the newly re-opened Reading Abbey and its quarter, and the re-designed gallery at Reading Museum with some gems from the University of Reading’s Special Collections. A drinks reception will be held at Reading Museum before the conference dinner, will be held at the Victoria Hall in Reading’s Town Hall on the Friday evening – please remember to select this on the registration form. Registration options are available for the full three days, or for individual day registration. A special reduced fee is offered for students opting for the full three days registration.
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Conference: Illuminating the Dark Ages Manuscript Art and Knowledge in the Early Medieval World

 

Edinburgh conference.jpg

PROGRAMME

Thursday 28th of June

11.00    Reception, talks, and manuscript display at the University Library’s   Centre for Research Collections (CRC). Venue: 5th floor of the Main Library building, George Square.

Welcome by Rachel Hosker, Deputy Head of Special Collections (CRC).

Presentation by Aline Brodin, “From the Scriptorium to the Screen. Exploring medieval manuscripts in the digital age”.

Talks by Giulia Sagliardi, Emma Trivett and Manuel de Zubiria Rueda.

NB. A priori this event is only open to speakers and chairs (additional places will be subject to space availability).

14.00    Lunch break

15.00-15.30    General Registration. Venue: Hunter Building at Edinburgh College of Art (Lauriston Place, Ground floor)

Welcome and initial remarks (Venue: Lecture Theatre, Hunter Building)

15.30-17.00.    Session I. Manuscripts in the Christian East. Chaired by Niels Gaul.

Elijah Hixson (Edinburgh), “The lost miniatures in Codex Sinopensis(Paris, BnF, supplément grec 1286), a sixth-century copy of the Gospel of Matthew”

Ketevan Mamasakhlisi (Tbilisi), “A few theological issues from the teachings of St. Amun”

Courtney Tomaselli (Harvard), “Teach me Good Judgement and Knowledge. King David as Spiritual Father in a Byzantine Book of Psalms”

Irma Mamasakhlisi (Tbilisi), “Healing miracles of Christ from the Gelati Gospels”

 

17.00-18.00    Keynote I. Dr Felicity Harley-McGowan (Yale).

“Models of Suffering: The Passion miniatures of the St Augustine Gospels and their iconographic sources”

20.00    Conference dinner

 

Friday 29th of June

Venue: Lecture Theatre, Hunter Building at ECA (Lauriston Place).

 

10.00-11.15    Session II. The Insular World I. Chaired by Heather Pulliam.

Jane Geddes (Aberdeen), “The earliest portrait of St Columba: his presence at St Gallen”

Christine Kemmerich (Bonn), “The Evangelist symbols in early medieval book illumination: the Book of Durrow in context”

Tina Bawden (Berlin), “Illuminating the elements”

11.30-13.00    Session III. Carolingian Europe and Ottonian Germany. Chaired by Jesús Rodríguez Viejo.

David Ganz (Berlin), “The initials in Berlin Philips 1741”

Ivana Jakovljevic-Lemcool (Belgrade), “Zodiacal imagery in early medieval manuscripts: appropriation and transmission of the Classical motif”

Jean-Louis Walther (Independent, Switzerland), “Les Tituli de la Bible de Moutier-Grandval”

Katharina Theil (Zurich), “Interplay between Figuration and Abstraction, Inside and Outside: The Abstract Goldsmith Cover of the Reichenau Gospels”

13.00    Lunch break

 

15.00-16.00   Keynote II. Prof. Michele Bacci (Fribourg).

“Dynamics of Artistic Interaction in the Mediterranean World After Antiquity: A Typological Approach”

 

16.15-17.10    Session IV. The Insular World II. Chaired by Heather Pulliam.

Colleen Curran (Oxford), “Fair words and fairer forms: the poetic function of the illustrations in Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Junius 11”

Stephanie McGucken (Edinburgh), “Illuminating the woman in Late Anglo-Saxon England: Images of Femininity and the Female body”

17.15-18.30    Session V. The Iberian Peninsula. Chaired by Jesús Rodríguez Viejo.

Roger Collins (Edinburgh), “The Beatus Problem”

Soledad de Silva y Verástegui (Basque Country), “Bibles, the Beatus Commentary and canonic collections: Three great illustrated manuscripts from tenth-century Hispania”

Jessica Sponsler (Pennsylvania College of A&D), “In the Pure Womb of the River: The Baptism of Christ in the Girona Beatus and theological dilemmas of tenth-century Iberia”

18.30    Concluding remarks and acknowledgments.