Category Archives: Conference

Conference: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 28th June 2017 – 30th June 2017

238d-5c94-4eb4-bd92-3202Conference: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517, St Anne’s College, Oxford, 28th June 2017 – 30th June 2017
Fees: Standard Registration Fee – £160.00; graduate Registration Fee – £120.00; dinner – £60.00
Register by June 21

After Chichele adopts an investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period.

 

CFP: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait, 14th – 18th Cent. (1-2 Dec 17)

08c_boldCFP: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait, 14th – 18th
Cent. (1-2 Dec 17), Munich / München, Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, 01. – 02.12.2017
Deadline: Apr 30, 2017
Applications for a lecture with an abstract of max. 3,000 characters
can be sent until April 30 2017 to the following address
Email: mattmuel@uni-mainz.de

Head and Body: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait Between the 14th
and 18th Centuries

Kopf und Körper: Evidenzen der Macht im Herrscherporträt des 14.-18
Jahrhunderts

What meanings do head and body convey in the medieval and early modern
ruler portrait? How do its mimetic schemes and visual projections of
power relate to each other? How are conceptually abstract norms and
values of rulership transposed to categories of looking, how do images
of bodies concretize these norms and values, and what modes of
representation do they cultivate? Research on the history of portraits
has relegated these questions to the margins; we presently lack a
systematic analysis. Nevertheless, head and body forged central
attributes and categories for physical manifestations of rulership in
the Middle Ages and early modern period. The specific conditions of
their visual portrayal is therefore of particular interest. Unlike in
republican or democratic political systems, where the presence and
legitimation of ruling power is supported by an elected government or a
constitution, in principalities and monarchies the prince or king
himself guaranteed the legitimacy of his own rule. He did this above
all else through his physical body, whose visually and haptically
experienced presence first lent the necessary evidence for his
sovereignty.
The conference should comprehensively thematize the different
normative, material, medial, functional, and aesthetic aspects of the
corporeal and material presence of rulership in painted and printed
ruler portraits from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

Scientific Management:
Prof. Dr. Matthias Müller (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Pfisterer (Ludwig Maximilians-Universität München),
Dr. Elke Anna Werner (Freie Universität Berlin)

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Aguilar de Campoo, Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017 (VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis)

fsmlrph_capitelmonasterio_rom_cvalle

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo (SPAIN), Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017.

CFP for 20-minute ‘free papers’ open until 30 June 2017
How to apply:
send an email with name, Academic institution, 1 page abstract and main bibliography to plhuerta@santamarialareal.org

How to enrol in the conference: email: plhuerta@santamarialareal.org
Price:
Regular 125 € Reduced 90 € Special (students) 60 €

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic –at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case.

In one of the best-known texts related to medieval art, Bernard of Clairvaux railed against the imaginative variety of profane art displayed in twelfth-century Cluniac monasteries, which he considered to be a subversion of the moral order of monastic life. Bernard’s diatribe not only confirms the fact that linking the two realms was common but also raises the question of audience and hence also spatiality. As the anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard postulated, sacredness (and therefore the profane) might be considered as situational, in a chronological as well as in a spatial sense. An object considered sacred in a given period may be considered profane or magical in a different time and/or space; decontextualization and reuse are thus also important issues related to the topic. Profane does not always imply anti-sacred. Indeed, given the fact that profanus means “in front of the consecrated enclosure,” the inclusion of secular elements within sacred domains suggests a dynamic interweaving that extends beyond the mere incorporation of motifs and objects. Sometimes the contacts between the two domains was regulated by rites that provided the conditions within which the relationship was made possible (i.e. consecration); other times, as when natural science was assimilated into the choice and manufacture of materials, the overlapping of sacred and profane underlies the processes of art.

In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of subversive elements in sacred art –from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Programme:

Friday, 29th September
Aguilar de Campoo

09.45h : Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis Opening
Chair: Francesca Español UB

10.00h Michele Bacci, Université de Fribourg – Intrusos en los iconos: perspectivas comparativas sobre los retratos individuales en la iconografia sagrada
10.45h Discussion

11.45h Philippe Cordez, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Le repentir d’un magicien ? Les camées de la statuette de David à la cathédrale de Bâle (vers 1320)
12.30h Free paper
12.50h Discussion

16.00h Fernado Villansenor, Universidad de Cantabria – Lo profano y sus espacios: discursos marginales en la Castilla tardogótica
16.45h Javier Docampo, Biblioteca Nacional de España – Las representaciones de los trabajos de los meses en libros de horas: la construcción de un imaginario social
17.15 Discussion

17.45 Round table. “Profano: perímetros espaciales, iconicos y semanticos en el arte medieval / Profane: spatial, iconic, and semantic edges in medieval art” Gerardo Boto.

18.45 Public presentation of the new editorial series “Ars Mediaevalis. Estudios de arte medieval”

Saturday, 30th September
Palencia

(Chair: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños UVA)

10.00h Kathrin Müller, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main Subversive – Devices: Cosmological Diagrams and the Problem of the Sacred
10.45h Free paper
11.05h Discussion

12.00h Beate Fricke, Universität Bern – Representing the Cosmos’ Origins, illuminating cosmological thoughts
12.45h Free paper
13.05h Discussion
16.00h Academic visit: Burgos: Santa María de las Huelgas Reales; Cartuja de Miraflores

Sunday, October 1st
Agilar de Campoo

(Chair: Javier Martínez Aguirre UCM)

09.15h Milagros Guardia, Universitat de Barcelona – Las pinturas murales de Sant Joan de Boi: de como contextualizar la iconografia profana
10.00h Free paper
10.20h Discussion
11.20h Free paper

11.40h Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University / Masaryk University – From Vanitas to Veritas: the Profane as a Fifth Mode of Seeing
12.20h Discussion

13.00h Conclusions and perspectives
13.15h Closing ceremony

 

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference – 23 March 2017

collectingCollecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed. Speakers include: Maeve O’Donnell-Morales, Zoe Opacic, Emily Guerry, Amy Smith, Peter Toth, Amy Jeffs, Anna Kelley, Michael Carter, Naomi Speakman, and Claudio Corsi.

For full programme and tickets, see here.

At Close Quarters: Experiencing the Domestic, 1400-1600

unnamedThis interdisciplinary conference examines late medieval and early modern experiences ‘at close quarters’. Building on recent research into the architecture and objects that shaped the pre-modern household, we examine the nooks and crannies, challenges and constructions of the domestic environment, and its interaction with art, literature and thought.

Register here.

Friday, 3rd March. York. Bowland Auditorum, Berrick Saul Building.

Registration 9.00-9.20
Welcome 9.20

Conference Keynote 9.30-10.30

Tara Hamling (University of Birmingham) and Catherine Richardson (University of Kent) A Day at Home in Early Modern England: The Materiality of Domestic Life.

Coffee 10.30-11.00

Session One 11.00-12.30: Challenging Domesticities

Doron Bauer and Elena Paulino (Florida State University and Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence) The Textual Construction of Domestic Spaces in Late Medieval and Early Modern Majorca.
Angela Nicholls (University of Warwick) Hearth and Home: Living in An Almshouse in Early Modern England.
María Molina (Independent Scholar) Homes in Troubled times: Domesticity and Emotions in Granada during the Sixteenth Century.

Lunch 12.30-13.30

Session Two 13.30-15.00: Constructing the Domestic

Christina Farley (University of Cambridge) When Walls Talk: Liveliness in the Tudor Domestic Interior.
Samantha Chang (University of Toronto) Enter Stage Left: Stepping into the Seventeenth-Century Painter’s Studio.
Iman Sheeha (University of Warwick) Look in the place where he was wont to sit/ His Blood! It is too manifest:’ The House as Extension of Identity in The Tragedy of Master Arden of Faversham.

Tea Break 15.00-15.30

Session Three & Closing Remarks 15.30-16.30: Looking Forward: Historic Interiors in the Present Day

Gillian Draper (University of Kent) Show-rooms? The Nature and Impact of the Public Presentation of Historic Domestic Interiors Today.

Conference: The Courtauld’s 22nd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium: Medieval Collaborations

cfp-imageSaturday 4 February 2017
10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Kenneth Clark Lecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN,

The traditional art-historical concern of attribution of works of art to specific masters has given way to more nuanced approaches to the artistic production of the Middle Ages that focus on collaborative working practices. Collaborations like that of Simone Martini and Lippo Memmi, the illuminators of the Winchester Bible, or the creators of Opus Anglicanum reveal a complex picture of artistic co-operation. Notions of the single commanding master have been replaced with collaborative artisan activity across disparate media, from the early-medieval cloister to the increasing specialisation of the late-medieval shop.

The Courtauld Institute’s 22nd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider new approaches to artistic collaborations of the Middle Ages, and how conceptions of collaboration have impacted on the study of these works.

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research.

Organised by Meg Bernstein (The Courtauld Institute of Art Kress Fellow 2015-7 / University of California, Los Angeles) and Imogen Tedbury (The Courtauld Institute of Art / National Gallery) with the generous support of The Sackler Research Forum.

Programme
09.30 – 10.00 Registration

10.00 – 10.10 Welcome

Session 1: Networks in collaboration. Chaired by Sophie Kelly (University of Kent)

10.10 – 10.30
Maeve O’Donnell-Morales, The Courtauld Institute of Art
It Took a Village: Collaborations at the Medieval Altar between Donors, Artists and Clerics

10.30 – 10.50
Aude Chevalier, Paris Nanterre Université
Collaborations in medieval copperware craftsmanship: the case study of French copper alloy censers (11th-17th centuries)

10.50 – 11.10
Maggie S. Crosland, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Commission as Collaboration: Untangling Agency in the Book of Hours of Philip the Bold

11.10 – 11.30
Discussion

11.30 – 12.00
TEA / COFFEE BREAK

Session 2: Artists in collaboration. Chaired by Lydia Hansell

12.00 – 12.20
Eowyn Kerr-Di Carlo, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Santa Maria degli Angeli or not? Considering Florentine artistic networks and the painter-illuminators of Fitzwilliam MS 30

12.20 – 12.40
Eleonora Cagol, Technische Universität Dresden
The workshop of Jörg Arzt and Jörg Feiss: winged altarpieces as evidence of artistic collaboration in South Tyrol at the end of the Middle Ages

12.40 – 13.00
Bryan C. Keene, The J. Paul Getty Museum / The Courtauld Institute of Art
Pacino / Pacinesque: Collaborative Choir Book Commissions in Early Trecento Florence

13.00 – 13.20

Discussion

13.20 – 14.30

LUNCH (speakers only)

Session 3: Collaborating across media. Chaired by Teresa Lane

14.30 – 14.50
Ella Beaucamp, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich
A joint venture from Venice: Medieval rock-crystal miniatures

14.50 – 15.10
Marie Quillent, University of Picardy Jules Verne
Artistic Collaboration in Medieval Funeral Sculpture in the North of France: the Tomb of Adrien de Hénencourt in the Cathedral of Amiens

15.10 – 15.30
Amanda Hilliam, National Gallery / Oxford Brookes University
Carlo Crivelli and the Goldsmith’s Art: shared aesthetics and technologies

15.30 – 15.50

Discussion

15.50 – 16.20

BREAK

Session 4: Collaborating across time. Chaired by Miguel Ayres DeCampos

16.20 – 16.40
Esther Dorado-Ladera, Independent Scholar
Reuse of Hispanic Muslim architecture during the Middle Ages: Christian interventions in the Aljaferia Palace

16.40 – 17.00
Oliver Mitchell, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Collaboration and conflict in Hugo de Folieto’s Liber de rotae religionis et simulationis

17.00 – 17.20
Costanza Beltrami, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Building and rebuilding the cloister of Segovia Cathedral (1436-1530): collaborations across space and time

17.20 – 17.50

Discussion

17.50 – 18.00
Closing remarks: Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

18.00
RECEPTION

View conference programme here.