Category Archives: Conference

Conference: ‘Church, Saints and Seals, 1150-1300’, Canterbury Christ Church University, 8 May 2020

As part of Becket 2020, this one-day conference combines presentations by experts on seals with a visit to the Cathedral Archives and Conservation Studio. Speakers will discuss the iconography of seals, including representations of sacred buildings and Becket’s murder, as well as the materiality of seals and sealing practices.

Timetable:

10.00-10.30            Registration and Refreshments

10.30-11.15            Welcome and Session One: Professor Markus Späth

11.15-12.00            Session Two: Dr Lloyd de Beer and Professor Sandy Heslop

12.00-13.00            Lunch

13.00-13.45           Session Three: Dr Philippa Hoskin

13.45-14.30           Session Four: Dr Paul Dryburgh

14.30-15.00            Refreshments

15.00-15.45            Session Five: short presentations and concluding remarks

16.00-17.00            Visit to Cathedral Archives and Conservation Studio

Tickets: Full price (including lunch) £50; CCCU and Kent University students (including lunch) £25

Tickets and more information here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-and-humanities/events/arts-and-humanities/ckhh/saints-and-seals.aspx

Conference: ‘The Intercultural Roots of Early Scholasticism’, 23-24 January 2020

The Intercultural Roots Early Scholasticism: Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Latin

23-24 January 2020, Goodenough College, Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB

 

 Please register here:  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-intercultural-roots-early-scholasticism-greek-hebrew-arabic-latin-tickets-80013698125

Please book lunch separately here: https://estore.kcl.ac.uk/product-catalogue/academic-faculties/faculty-of-arts-humanities/theology-religious-studies/lunch-for-the-intercultural-roots-of-early-scholasticism-conference

 

The late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries represent a dynamic period in Western intellectual history. These were years, before Aristotle’s works were fully digested, during which philosophical works written in Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic were becoming available in Latin for the first time, skewing understanding of Aristotle considerably and introducing themes into Latin thought in their own right. The proposed workshop seeks to better understand the phenomenon of the confluence of Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic sources that influenced early scholastic interpretations of Aristotle as well as Latin authorities like Augustine by investigating more closely those sources and the phenomenon of their transmission into Latin. In this connection, papers will be offered on various aspects of the Greek/Arabic/Hebrew tradition that had an influence on early scholastic thought particularly in the late twelfth and first half of the thirteenth century.

 

Speakers

  • Amos Bertolacci (Lucca)
  • Charles Burnett (The Warburg Institute)
  • Alexander Fidora (ICREA—Barcelona)/ Nicola Polloni (Berlin)
  • Dag Hasse (Würzburg)
  • John Marenbon (Trinity College, Cambridge)
  • Lydia Schumacher (King’s College London)
  • Lesley Smith (Oxford)
  • Anna-Katharina Strohschneider (King’s College London)
  • Faith Wallis (McGill)

 

Provisional Schedule

Thursday 23 January

10:00-10:15     Welcome and Introduction

10:15-11:15     Paper 1: Charles Burnett (The Warburg Institute), ‘Arabic and Latin Summae’

11:15-11:45     Tea break

11:45-12:45     Paper 2: Dag Hasse (Würzburg), Translating Double Intentionality from Arabic into Latin

1:00-2:00         Lunch

2:00-3:00         Paper 3: Lesley Smith (Oxford), The Summa Halensis, William of Auvergne, Maimonides, and Avicenna

3:15-4:15         Paper 4: Faith Wallis (McGill), A Twelfth Century Physician Reflects on the Soul, the Spirits, and the Problems of Free Will

4:15-4:45         Tea break

4:45-5:45         Paper 5: José Meirinhos (Porto), Intellectus agens est triplex: Jean of la Rochelle and Petrus Hispanus Portugalensis

6:00-7:00         Opening Reception

Friday 24 January

10:00-10:15     Welcome and Introduction

10:15-11:15     Paper 6: Amos Bertolacci (Lucca), Averroist or Anti-Averroist? On Albert the Great’s Attitude towards Averroes in the Commentary on the Metaphysics

11:15-11:45     Tea break

11:45-12:45     Paper 7: Alexander Fidora (ICREA—Barcelona)/Nicola Polloni (Berlin), Dominicus Gundissalinus and the Reception of Arabic Philosophy in the 13th Century

1:00-2:00         Lunch

2:00-3:00         Paper 8: John Marenbon (Cambridge), The Intercultural Roots of Early Scholasticism: Towards a New Historiography

3:15-4:15         Paper 9: Anna-Katharina Strohschneider (King’s College London)

4:15-4:45         Tea break

4:45-5:45         Paper 10: Lydia Schumacher (King’s College London), Early Franciscan Psychology: A Milestone in the Reception of Islamic and Jewish Philosophy

Conference: ”Our Aelred’: Friendship, Leadership and Sainthood at Rievaulx Abbey’, 3-4th July 2020

Join English Heritage at this major conference focused on Aelred, abbot of Rievaulx between 1147 and 1167.

Called ‘our Aelred’ by his monks, the abbot was one of the most important monastic leaders of the Middle Ages and remains an inspirational figure to this day.

Bringing together leading academics and heritage professionals, this conference provides a unique opportunity to examine Aelred’s impact on the architectural development of Rievaulx, his role in the Cistercian settlement of northern England and his activities as an author. Speakers will address the abbot’s impact in the wider monastic world and Aelred’s legacy, including his veneration as a saint and how his extraordinary life and achievements can be interpreted for 21st-century visitors to Rievaulx.

The event also features a round-table discussion focused on debates about Aelred’s sexuality.

The international panel of speakers includes Professor Janet Burton, Dr Michael Carter, Professor Marsha Dutton, Professor Peter Fergusson, Dr Elizabeth Freeman, Dr Alexandra Gajewski, Professor Brian Golding, Dr Katherine Harvey and Professor Emilia Jamroziak.

The registration fee includes entry to all the conference sessions, an evening drinks reception on 3 July and refreshments and lunch on 4 July.

The conference is timed to coincide with the Leeds International Medieval Conference (6-9 July), registration for which is separate.

A full programme will be available in early spring 2020.

Tickets and more information here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/our-aelred-friendship-leadership-and-sainthood-at-rievaulx-abbey-tickets-90598335059

Scholarship: BAA travel scholarship to April 2020 Romanesque Conference, Hildesheim

The British Archaeological Association has a limited number of scholarships for their 2020 Romanesque Conference in Hildesheim. These scholarships are aimed towards students studying Early Medieval Art History/Archaeology or Architecture, especially those studying Romanesque.

Send a short CV & referee details to jsmcneill@btinternet.com or rplant62@hotmail.com by 15th November 2019.

 

More information about the conference:

The Year 1000 in Romanesque Art and Architecture

Date(s): 14 – 16 Apr 2020

Venue: Hildesheim, Germany

The British Archaeological Association will hold the sixth in its biennial International Romanesque conference series in conjunction with the Dommuseum in Hildesheim on 14-16 April, 2020. The theme is Romanesque and the Year 1000, and the aim is to examine transformations in the art and architecture of the Latin Church around
the turn of the millennium. The Conference will take place at the Cathedral Museum in Hildesheim, with the opportunity to stay on for two days of visits to Romanesque monuments on 17-18 April. The 30 years to either side of the year 1000 witnessed remarkable developments in iconography and stylistic expression. It saw portable devotional statues come into being, the revival of bronze-casting, the reemergence of architectural relief sculpture, and the application of novel, or at least re-understood, architectural forms. In addition to the above, individual papers are concerned with the impact of objects from the Carolingian past and Byzantine present, royal patronage, monastic reform, the organization of scriptoria, ‘authorship’, changes in representational strategies, and regional affiliation.

 

Speakers include Marcello Angheben, Claude Andrault-Schmitt, Michael Brandt, Jordi Camps, Hugh Doherty, Eric Fernie, Shirin Fozi, Barbara Franzé, Richard Gem, Agata Gomolka, Lindy Grant, Cecily Hennessy, Wilfried Keil, Sophie Kelly, Bruno Klein, Florian Meunier, Jesús Rodríguez Viejo, Tobias Schoo, Markus Späth, Béla Zsolt Szakács, Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo, Eliane Vergnolle, Michele Vescovi, Rose Walker, and Tomasz Weclawowicz

Found out more here: https://thebaa.org/event/hildesheim/

Conference Programme: “Women and Violence in the Late Medieval Mediterranean, ca. 1100-1500, 27 September 2019

The last decades have witnessed an increased interest in research on the relationship between women and violence in the Middle Ages, with new works both on female criminality and on women as victims of violence. The contributions of gender theory and feminist criminology have renewed the approached used in this type of research. Nevertheless, many facets of the complex relationship between women and violence in medieval times still await to be explored in depth. This conference aims to understand how far the roots of modern assumptions concerning women and violence may be found in the late medieval Mediterranean, a context of intense cultural elaboration and exchange which many scholars have indicated as the cradle of modern judicial culture. While dialogue across the Mediterranean was constant in the late Middle Ages, occasions for comparative discussion remain rare for modern-day scholars, to the detriment of a deeper understanding of the complexity of many issues. Thus, we encourage specialists of different areas across the Mediterranean (Western Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic world) to contribute to the discussion. What were the main differences and similarities? How did these change through time? What were the causes for change? Were coexisting assumptions linking femininity and violence conflicting or collaborating?

The conference will take place over two days thanks to the generous contributions of The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, the Maison Française d’Oxford, and the UMR Orient- Mediterranée Monde Byzantin.

Keynote speakers
Professor Carol Lansing (UC Santa Barbara)
Professor Élisabeth Malamut (Université de Provence)
Conclusion by Professor Annick Peters-Custot (Université de Nantes)

This event is free. To secure your place, please register here.

Conference: Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, St Andrews Uni, 13-14 September 2019

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place at the University of St Andrews on 13-14 September 2019, and is jointly held by the School of Art History, SAIMS and the University’s Special Collections Division. Please send all queries to medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Friday 13 September  [Venue: Napier Reading Room, Martyrs Kirk, North Street]

14:00 Emily Savage: word of welcome

14:15 Rachel Hart (University of St Andrews Library, Special Collections): “The surviving evidence of medieval collecting, curating and assembling to be found in the Library of the University of St Andrews”

15:00-16:00: Handling session in Special Collections with Rachel Hart

17:15: Keynote lecture: Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) [Venue: School 3 on the Quad]:

“History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in Church Collections, c. 800-1300”

18:30: Conference dinner [Venue TBA]

 

Saturday 14 Sept [Venue for all sessions: Parliament Hall, South Street]

8:30-9: Coffee

9:00-10:45 Morning session  1: Relics and reliquaries – Chair: Kate Rudy

Juliette Calvarin (Harvard University): “Afterlives of Funeral Palls in the Sacristy (St. Thomas’, Prague, c. 1410)”

Ashley West (Temple University): “Heiltumsbücher and Artistic Authority in an Early Visual Archive”

Sarina Kursteiner (Columbia University): “Notarial Acts as Sacred Matter: Bolognese Notaries and their Images in the Archive, 1290-1303”

10:45-11: Coffee and comfort break

11:00-12:45 Morning session  2: Treasuries – Chair: Emily Savage

Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto): “Reflecting a Golden Age: The Material Composition of History in the Treasuries of the Late Medieval Maasland”

Marta Simões & Joana Antunes (CEAACP-GEMA, University of Coimbra): “Reading the Space, Listing the Riches: The Old Cathedral of Coimbra and its Medieval Inventories”

Zachary Stewart (Texas A&M University): “The St Peter Mancroft Inventory: Register, Record, Teaching Resource”

12:45- 2:00 Lunch

14:00-15:45: Afternoon session 1: Manuscripts as Archives – Chair: Julian Luxford

Kathleen Wilson Ruffo (Royal Ontario Museum): “Curating Cultural Capital: A little-known Dutch Psalter as Diplomatic Archive”

Shannon Wearing (UCLA): “The ‘Eternal Memory of Great Things’: Illustrated Secular Cartularies of the Twelfth Century,from Bavaria to Barcelona”

Orly Amit (Tel Aviv University): “Appropriating the Archive: Promoting Legitimacy and Shaping Historical Memory through the Library of John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford”

15:45-16:00 Coffee and comfort break

16:00-17:45: Afternoon session 2: Storing the Archive  Chair: Rachel Hart

Diego Belmonte-Fernandez (Universidad de Sevilla): “Collecting, curating and remembering in the Cathedral of Seville: a portable written archive from the fifteenth century”

Rafael Ceballos-Roa & María del Carmen Rodríguez-López (Universidad de León): “The B-side of the parchment: two medieval monastic archives from the kingdom of León”

Amélie Marineau-Pelletier (University of Ottawa and École des hautes études en sciences sociales): “The Locus Credibilis and the Making of Urban Authority: Preserving the Written Word in Metz (14th-15th Centuries)”

Ending around 18:00

BAA Post-Graduate Conference – Saturday 23rd November 2019

Join us for the first British Archaeological Association Post-graduate Conference.

We are excited to present a diverse conference which includes postgraduates and early career researchers in the fields of medieval history of art, architecture, and archaeology.

The BAA postgraduate conference offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present their research and exchange ideas with fellow members of the BAA.

 

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

Conference Programme

9:30am – 9:50am – Registration

 

9:50am – 10:00am – Welcome

 

10:00am – 11:20am – Cultural imagination and Identity

Chair: Professor Sandy Heslop, University of East Anglia

Ryan Low (Harvard University)Seeing Identity in Crusader Colonial Ceramics

Netta Clavner (Birkbeck University of London)Defining Social Order: The Civic Scene of Medieval Bristol

Lily Hawker-Yates (Christ Church Canterbury University)Interpretations of Barrows in Later Medieval England

 

11:20am – 11:40am – Refreshment Break

 

11:40 am – 12:40pm – Landscape and Urban Space 

Chair: Dr Alexandra Gajewski, The Burlington Magazine/Institute of Historical Research, London

Dana Katz (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)The Lake Effect: An Environmental Case Study of Landscape Transformation at the Royal Parkland of La Favara in Medieval Sicily

Richard Nevell (University of Exeter)The Archaeology of Destruction in the Middle Ages

 

12:40pm -13:40pm – Lunch (provided)

 

13:45pm – 15:00pm – Iconography and Interpretation

Chair: Dr Emily Guerry, University of Kent

Dustin S. Aaron (Institute of Fine Arts, New York University)Revisiting the Meaning of Mouths on the Austro-Bavarian Frontier

Innocent Smith, op (Universität Regensburg)Representatio Representationis: Depictions of the Mass in 13th-century Missals

Muriel Araujo Lima (University of São Paulo)Sinful Nature: Creation Cycles, Moralizing Content and Figurative Exegesis in Medieval Bestiaries

 

15:00pm – 15:15pm – Refreshment Break

 

15:15pm – 16:15pm – Visualising the Cult of Saints

Chair: Professor Michael Michael, Research Fellow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow

Angela Websdale (University of Kent), The Cult of Saint Edward the Confessor and the Influence of Westminster Palace and Henry III’s Maison Dieu at Ospringe upon the Gothic Wall Paintings in Faversham

Katie Toussaint-Jackson (University of Kent)The Wall Paintings of Horsham St Faith and their Medieval Modifications

 

16:15pm – 16:30pm – Comfort Break

 

16:30pm – 17:45pm – Sculptures and Masons: Artistic agency, patronage and construction

Chair: John McNeill, Hon. Secretary, BAA

Aurora Corio (University of Genova)Lombard Sculptors in Western Tuscany at the heart of the Duecento: The case of St. Martino in Lucca

Teresa Martínez (Instituto de Historia, CCHS-CSIC/ University of Warwick)The petrification of Zamora: A specific answer to general questions about Construction and Society in the Middle Ages.

 

17:45pm – 18:00pm – Closing Remarks

 

NB: We will be providing a light lunch and refreshments to all attending. Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements: postgradconf@thebaa.org

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk