Category Archives: Conference

Last conference places: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650

quadfromgateConference: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650, residential conference at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 6-9 September 2017
Register by 3 September

Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded on humanistic principles in 1517.  Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the long sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker; it played a prominent part in the production of the King James Bible.  In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we are holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a two hundred-year period of Renaissance and Reformation.

The programme includes papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alexandra Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Lucy Kaufman, Nicholas Hardy, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte.  A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

Details are available here: Conference Programme.

Booking is now open: please click here Renaissance College Conference.

If you have any questions about your booking, please feel free to contact kerry.atkinson@ccc.ox.ac.uk.  For any queries about the content of the conference, please contact john.watts@ccc.ox.ac.uk.

 

Looking back: Medieval & Early Modern Festival, University of Kent, June 2017

The 16th-17th June 2017 was the third annual MEMS Festival, a two-day celebration of all things Medieval and Early Modern at the University of Kent. Papers covered all kinds of topics, from art and literature to politics, identity, and everyday life from the entire period. The range of material meant that lots of different areas of expertise were brought together, leading to interesting discussions and comparisons. There were also lots of exciting practical workshops, such as a “mystery trail” in the Special Collections and Archives and workshopping a scene from the York Corpus Christi play with Claire Wright (University of Kent).

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Kent undergraduate students present their final year dissertations

The two dedicated medieval art sessions covered objects from far and wide. The first panel looked at style and symbolism over the artistic networks in England and France. Cassandra Harrington (University of Kent) gave probably a paper on foliate head keystones, looking at a particular example from the chapter house at Cluny, and distinguishing them from the usual interpretation of such heads as “Green Men”. Angela Websdale’s (University of Kent) paper on the “lost” wall paintings at Faversham Cathedral investigated a potential Westminster workshop moving between London and Kent, while Alice Ball’s (University of Kent) considered images of the Prodigal Son, in particular how the iconography of the windows at Chartres cathedral may have influenced the Bibles Moralisees.

The second medieval art panel was made up of three students who had just finished their undergraduate degrees at the University of Kent, who all presented on their recently-completed dissertations. Michael Gittins gave a fresh look at a well-known object, considering the heraldry and weapons pictured in the Morgan Picture Bible to make a convincing argument that Walter of Brienne may have been the original patron. In contrast, Lucy Splarn’s paper turned towards a tiny and much less well-known pilgrimage badge of St Thomas Becket, looking at the unusual iconography of the saint riding a peacock (see embedded 3D model). This could have been a representation of Thomas’s personality, and the idea that he was arrogant in his outward appearance but humble inside, which tied in well with Paul Binski’s paper at the Thomas Becket study day on the concept of personality in the Middle Ages. Catherine Heydon gave the third paper, on the idea of Purgatory in the thought of St Augustine, thinking about the way in which the imagery of Classical thought influenced the theology of the early Church.

Medieval and Early Modern art made an appearance in other sessions as well. Hannah Straw (University of Kent) gave a paper on the imagery of Charles II’s escape in the Boswell Oak tree and how it was used to shape the king’s public identity. Emily Guerry (University of Kent) also looked at public identity and the use of history, by examining the significance of James Comey’s (mis)quotation of Henry II in his testimony, and the way in which the past can be used in the public imagination.

Each afternoon of the conference was taken up with activities and workshops, which was a great opportunity to get some hands-on work with objects and new technologies. This included a set of workshops and a tour of Eastbridge Pilgrim’s Hospital, which would have been a stopping point for hundreds of visitors to St Thomas’s shrine. Despite the ancient surroundings, two of these were on new technologies for approaching medieval objects and buildings, using GIS mapping and 3D modelling to see medieval art in a new way. Amy Jeffs (Digital Pilgrim Project) led a workshop on digitising pilgrim souvenirs and using software to enable better study and public appreciation of objects which are usually difficult to access, leading to a discussion on the benefits and potential issues of digitalisation. Tim Beach also used technologies to explore medieval art, but on a much larger scale, demonstrating how 3D laser scanning can be used to make a perfect 3D digital representation of medieval buildings, performing a live demonstration on the undercroft of Eastbridge Hospital itself.

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Attendees take part  in a workshop in the Eastbridge Hospital Chapel

The whole conference was an exciting look at new research and approaches to medieval and early modern history, and the diverse mix of papers meant that lots of interesting discussions were happening all through the weekend, finishing up in the beautiful space of Eastbridge Hospital. The festival showcased the new research in the History of Art emerging from the University of Kent, both in relation to the wealth of local art around Canterbury itself, and the international nature of work being done, with a particular focus on the art of France and networks between France and England.    

Review by Han Tame

Postgraduate, University of Kent

Conf: The Book as Medium: Medieval Manuscripts & their Functions, VIENNA (1st – 2nd Sep 2017)

01. – 02.09.2017
Registration deadline: Aug 15, 2017

Das Buch als Medium – Mittelalterliche Handschriften und ihre Funktionen
Interdisziplinäre Graduiertentagung

Universität Wien
Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Altes AKH
Spitalgasse 2, Hof 9
1090 Wien

While participation is free we ask that delegates register via this link by 15. August 2017:
tagung.buchfunktion.kunstgeschichte@univie.ac.at

PROGRAMM

Freitag, 01. September 2017

08:30 – 09:00 Uhr: Registrierung, Kennenlernen, Kaffee
09:00 – 09:15 Uhr: Grußworte

09:15 – 10:15 Uhr: Keynote
09:15 – 10:15 Uhr Kathryn Rudy (St. Andrews)

10:15 – 10:30 Uhr: Pause

10:30 – 12:00 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Gerd Micheluzzi)
10:30 Uhr
Kristina Kogler (Wien): Vidal Mayor – Die Bebilderung einer
aragonesischen Rechtshandschrift
10:50 Uhr     Diskussion
11:00 Uhr
Bernhard Kjölbye (Graz): Über den Bildschmuck der ‚Zwettler Bärenhaut‘
aus genealogischer Sicht
11:20 Uhr Diskussion
11:30 Uhr
Philippa Sissis (Berlin): Zwischen Lesen und Schreiben – Humanistische
Inszenierung in Relation zum Text
11:50 Uhr Diskussion

12:00 – 14:00 Uhr: Mittagspause

14:00 – 18:30 Uhr: Ausflug zum Augustiner-Chorherrenstift
Klosterneuburg (für Mitwirkende)

19:00 Uhr: Abendessen

Samstag, 02. September

08:45 – 09:00 Uhr: Kaffee

09:00 – 10:30 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Christina Jackel)
09:00 Uhr
Sophie Zimmermann (Wien): Büchergenealogien. Über imaginierten und
tatsächlichen Verlust deutschsprachiger Texte und Handschriften
09:20 Uhr Diskussion
09:30 Uhr
Timo Bülters (Oxford): Auf Spurensuche im Kloster – Ein niederdeutsches
Kräuterbuch in Nonnenhand
09:50 Uhr Diskussion
10:00 Uhr
Giulia Rossetto (Wien): Using and Re-Using Parchment Manuscripts: The
Case of the Byzantine Prayer-Books
10:20 Uhr Diskussion

10:30 – 10:50 Uhr: Pause

10:50 – 12:20 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Lena Sommer)
10:50 Uhr
Alexander Hödlmoser (Wien):    Die Österreichische Chronik der Jahre
1454 bis 1467. Editorische Anmerkungen zur Arbeit am Text – damals und
heute
11:10 Uhr Diskussion
11:20 Uhr
Eszter Nagy (Budapest): The Function of Mythological Images in Books of
Hours from Rouen
11:40 Uhr     Diskussion
11:50 Uhr
Irina von Morzé (Wien): Eine Weltgeschichte für den Kaiser: Rom, BAV,
Vat. lat. 5697 (vor 1437)
12:10 Uhr Diskussion

12:20 – 13:45 Uhr: Mittagspause

13:45 – 14:45 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Sophie Dieberger)
13:45 Uhr
Lisa Horstmann (Heidelberg): Der »Welsche Gast« von Thomasin von
Zerclaere. Veränderung der Bild-Text-Relation in 300 Jahren
Überlieferungsgeschichte
14:05 Uhr Diskussion
14:15 Uhr
Maximilian Wick (München): Die Leidener Wigalois-Handschrift – Ausdruck
einer subversiven Theologie?
14:35 Uhr Diskussion

14:50 – 15:10 Uhr: Pause

15:10 – 16:10 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Silvia Hufnagel)
15:10 Uhr
Stefanie Krinninger (Göttingen): „Het ich nu kunsten spyse / in mir,
daz ich […] / in ditz buch […] / Ein rede kunde getichten …“. Zum
Kunstbegriff des späten Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit
15:30 Uhr Diskussion
15:40 Uhr
Dennis Wegener (Wien): Das handschriftlich nachgetragene 117. Kapitel
des Theuerdank-Drucks Rar. 325a der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek München
16:00 Uhr Diskussion

16:10 – 16:30 Uhr: Pause

16:30 – 17:30 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Andrea Riedl)
16:30 Uhr
Justyna Kuczyńska (Krakau): The Franciscan Breviary (Ms. Czart. 1211)
in the Library of Princes Czartoryski in Kraków as a Masterpiece of the
Neapolitan Illumination Art under the Aragonese Dynasty
16:50 Uhr Diskussion
17:00 Uhr
Christina Weiler (Wien): Die Meditationes vitae Christi –
Franziskanische Devotionshandschriften des Trecento
17:20 Uhr Diskussion

17:20 – 18:00 Uhr: Abschlussdiskussion

TODAY: Leeds IMC, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland, Session 703

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland will be running its first conference session this year at the Leeds International Medieval Congress.

Session 703 – Tuesday 4 July 2017 – 14.15 to 15.45

The following papers will be delivered:

Ron Baxter (Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture and the Medieval Workshop (paper 703-a);

James King (The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Romanesque Sculpture of Dunfermline Abbey and Its Influence: Evidence and Some Questions (paper 703-b);

Agata Gomółka (Department of Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia) – Carving Romanesque Bodies (paper 703-a).

Abtstract

Romanesque art and architecture was transnational in a European context.
The architectural sculpture produced in the British Isles and Ireland during the late
11th and 12th centuries demonstrates the visceral connection between these off-
shore islands and mainland Europe at that time. In its inaugural session at the IMC,
the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI) is seen to reveal
some of the ways in which its searchable and fully illustrated database enables art
historians to build an understanding of Romanesque stone carving by identifying
authorship, tracing the diffusion of carved ornament, recreating workshop practice,
and reimagining aesthetic criteria. Launched in 1987 by Professor George Zarnecki
with British Academy support and now affiliated also to King’s College London, the
CRSBI is an Open Access website comprising illustrated records of the Romanesque
sculpture at some five thousand sites in Britain and Ireland.

Conf: IV Forum for the Art of the Middle Ages, Berlin & Brandenburg, 20-23rd Sep 2017

Berlin, Brandenburg an der Havel, 20. – 23.09.2017

IV. FORUM KUNST DES MITTELALTERS
BERLIN UND BRANDENBURG
360° – VERORTUNG, ENTGRENZUNG, GLOBALISIERUNG
20.–23. SEPTEMBER 2017

veranstaltet vom
Deutschen Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V.
mit der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, der Freien Universität Berlin
und dem Leibniz-Institut für Geschichte und Kultur des östlichen Europa

Das vierte Forum Kunst des Mittelalters widmet sich schwerpunktmäßig
Themenbereichen, die an den geographischen und methodischen Grenzen
klassischer Mittelalterforschung angesiedelt sind. Ausgangspunkt sind
die Veranstaltungsorte Berlin und Brandenburg an der Havel, wo
einerseits lokale mediävistische Themen zu verhandeln, andererseits
reiche Sammlungsbestände zu byzantinischer und vorderasiatischer Kunst
vorhanden sind. Entsprechend geht es um die Interaktion
zentraleuropäischer Kunst des Mittelalters mit künstlerischer
Produktion in anderen Regionen: von Osteuropa über den byzantinischen
Bereich, den Vorderen Orient, die Kaukasusregion und den Mittelmeerraum
bis hin zu den britischen Inseln und dem Ostseeraum einschließlich
Skandinaviens. Damit werden auch Forschungsbereiche wie die
Byzantinistik oder die Islamische Kunstgeschichte in den Fokus des
mediävistischen Bewusstseins gerückt, gerade vor dem Hintergrund der
massiven Gefährdungen künstlerischer und architektonischer Denkmäler im
Vorderen Orient. Thematisiert sind etwa Phänomene wie Migration,
Medientransformation und kulturelle Paradigmenwechsel. Indem wir nach
kulturell prägenden Regionen an den Grenzen „Europas“ und nach
transkulturellen Kontaktzonen fragen, werden auch Definitionen von
Mittelalter zur Debatte gestellt. – Als Pendant zu diesem Rundblick
präsentiert sich auch die Forschung zur Region Brandenburg/Berlin. Dazu
gehören ebenfalls Themen der museologischen und kunstwissenschaftlichen
Geschichte Berlins, wo die Erschließung von Zonen kulturellen
Austauschs eine lange Tradition hat.

MITTWOCH, 20. SEPTEMBER 2017
HUMBOLDT-UNIVERSITÄT ZU BERLIN (HU)

CfP: New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture, Leeds, 16-17 Mar 2018

Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, March 16 – 17, 2018
Deadline: Sep 30, 2017

New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture

Focusing on the materiality of medieval sculpture has proven crucial to
its study and has expanded our historical understanding of sculpture
itself. Whether monumental relief sculpture in stone, wooden sculptures
in the round, sculpted altarpieces, ivory plaques or enamelled
reliquaries, the possibilities for research on medieval sculpture now
extend far beyond the established canon.

Contemporary medieval sculpture studies have opened the field to
comparative and inclusive research that embraces the social,
performative, gendered and ritual uses of medieval sculpture. These
developments have inspired the organisers of the conference New
Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture to reflect on the field
and ask how do we investigate medieval sculpture today and what might
come ‘after’ materiality?

This two-day conference seeks to assess and critique the state of the
field on medieval sculpture and to investigate new directions,
approaches and technologies for research. A consideration of the state
of the field could be approached through, but is not limited to, the
following topics:

    Processes and techniques of medieval sculpture
    The sensory experience of medieval sculpture
    The ephemeral and intangible aspects of medieval sculpture
    Medieval sculpture, photography and digital reproduction
    Archives, casts and reconstructing medieval sculpture
    Sculpture and medievalism
    Historiography of medieval sculpture studies
    Exhibition histories of medieval sculpture

This conference is hosted by the Henry Moore Institute, a centre for
the study of sculpture, and is convened by Dr Elisa Foster, 2016-18
Henry Moore Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow.

Accommodation and reasonable travel expenses within the UK will be
reimbursed.

Paper proposals should be sent via email to Dr Elisa Foster:
elisa.foster@henry-moore.org by 30 September 2017.

CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500-1800) (London, 18 Nov 17)

The contested concept of “reproduction” stands at a critical nexus of
the conceptualisation of Early Modern artistic thought. The early
modern period has been characterised by the development of novel and
efficient reproduction technologies, as well as the emergence of global
empires, growing interconnectedness through trade, warfare and
conquest, and the rise of new markets and cultures of collecting. This
ethos of innovation and cultural exchange was, however, contextualised
against myriad contemporary ideologies still rooted in the values and
legends of narratives of the past. Reproduction stood at the centre of
this dichotomy. Set against the context of changing cultural tastes and
the increasingly overlapping public and private spheres,
‘reproductions’ were involved within changing viewing practices,
artistic pedagogy, acts of homage and collecting.

The idea of reproduction connotes a number of tensions: between
authenticity and counterfeit; consumption and production; innovation
and imitation; the establishment of archetype and the creation of
replica; the conceptual value of the original and the worth of the
reproduction as a novel work of art; the display of contextualised
knowledge and the de-contextualisation of the prototype. At the same
time, production is shaped historically through practices and
discourses, and has figured as a key site for analysis in the work of,
for example, Walter Benjamin, Richard Wolin, Richard Etlin, Ian Knizek
and Yvonne Sheratt. Participants are invited to explore reproduction
‘beyond Benjamin’, investigating both the technical and philosophical
implications of reproducing a work of art and seeking, where possible,
a local anchoring for the physical and conceptual processes involved.

We welcome proposals for papers that investigate the theme of
reproduction from the early modern period (c.1500-1800), including
painting, print making, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture,
graphic arts and the intersections between them. Papers can explore
artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary
divides and contributions from other disciplines, such as the history
of science and conservation, are welcome. Topics for discussion may
include, but are not limited to:

The conceptualisation and processes of reproduction and reproduction
technologies before and at the advent of ‘the mechanical’;
Reproduction in artistic traditions beyond ‘the West’;
The slippage between innovation and imitation;
Part-reproduction and the changing, manipulation and developments of
certain motifs;
Problematizing the aura of ‘authenticity’ and the ‘value’ of the
original, copies and collecting;
Fakes and the de-contextualisation of a work through its reproduction;
Reproduction within non-object based study e.g. architecture;
Theoretical alternatives and the vocabulary used to describe the
process and results of reproduction in contemporary texts.
Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word
biography by 6th July 2017 to kyle.leyden@courtauld.ac.uk and
natasha.morris@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by Kyle Leyden, Natasha Morris and Angela Benza (The
Courtauld Institute of Art)

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500–1800) (London, 18 Nov 17). In:
H-ArtHist, Jun 6, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/15728>.