Category Archives: Call for Journal Submissions

Call for submissions for Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Microsoft Word - 00CoverFront.docCOMITATUS: A JOURNAL OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES,
published annually under the auspices of the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, invites the submission of articles by graduate students and recent PhDs in any field of medieval and Renaissance studies.

Submissions should be sent as e-mail attachments in Word format.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR VOLUME 48 (2017): 1 FEBRUARY 2017.

The Comitatus editorial board will make its final selections by early May 2017.

Please send submissions to Dr. Blair Sullivan, sullivan@humnet.ucla.edu.

Call for Submissions: ‘Art(ifice),’ North Street Review, Spring 2017

ingolstadt_liebfrauenmc3bcnster_weinschenkenkapelle_astwerkCall for Submissions: ‘Art(ifice),’ North Street Review, University of St. Andrews
Deadline: December 1, 2016

Artifice, n. (Oxford English Dictionary ):

1. Human skill or workmanship as opposed to nature or a natural phenomenon.

2. Skill in devising and using expedients; artfulness, cunning, trickery.

These definitions of artifice contrasts human workmanship with the natural, leaving us with the dichotomy of nature versus humanity. But is art really the opposite of nature, or is there a way to bridge these two disparate domains? How do artists, curators, or collectors navigate the divide? How did viewers and creators of art approach this issue in the past, and is it even relevant question today?

How to submit: The editors of the North Street Review welcome submissions on this topic from postgraduates in Art History courses. Works between 3,000-5,000 words must be submitted to northstreetreview@gmail.com by 1 December, 2016 to be considered for publication in Spring 2017. Please format the document as a docx., adhere to Chicago style citations, and include a brief biography, with your name and affiliated institute. The North Street Review is a peer-reviewed post-graduate journal published by the School of Art History and Museum and Galleries Studies at the University of St. Andrews. Now in its twenty-first year, it has gone through many incarnations and is now a fully digital publication. For more information, please see our website.

Call for Submissions: Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACall for Submissions: Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval

The open-access peer-reviewed Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval seeks articles for publication in one of the journal’s two sections:

  • Monographic studies of iconography: from a general point of view, it will be analyzed a topic or symbol of medieval repertory, either of biblical precedence or apocryphal, mythological, scientific, etc.
  • Transversal studies of iconography: from a specific point of view, it will be analyzed one or several works of art with an iconographical relationship.

Articles for should be sent by email to irgonzal@ghis.ucm.es. The text must be written in Spanish, English or French, in a Word file.
Images, only accepted in JPG, GIF, TIFF, of BMP file, should be attached together with a list of contents including all the information concerning the work of art depicted and the origin of the reproduction.
The work must be original and conform to the rules of publication of the journal, both in extent and in the organization of the content and formal requirements.

For more information and for the journal’s editorial guidelines, click here.

CFP: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8Call for Papers: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)
Deadline: November 30, 2016

Issue 2018: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture,
1400-1700’

In his letter to Philippe de Lannoy, from 1578 (De ratione cum fructu
perigrinandi et preaesertim in Italia), Justus Lipsius summarized the
aims of traveling as: ‘utilitas’ and ‘voluptas’. Traveling, according
to Lipsius, would lead to spiritual enrichment, as it would bring one
into contact with different people, different lifestyles, and different
customs and morals. At the same time, it would increase knowledge about
other countries and places, and about history. More or less at the same
time appeared a growing number of guides and treatises on traveling
(artes apodemicae), meant to prepare travelers for their trip, giving
advice on how to deal with the various mores in different countries and
supplying ‘cultural’ information on topography, history, important
monuments and other attractions.

In this volume, we want to study the production of knowledge shaped by
the traveling guides and artes apodemicae, especially in their
interaction with the actual practices of traveling and acquiring
knowledge. What was the formative importance of (printed) guides and
travel literature for the practice of traveling? How decisive was the
information they supplied in directing the travelers’ interest and
attention, and in shaping their views and knowledge? Or, the other way
round, was the information offered in guides and art literature
specified and/or expanded, or did it acquire a different scope as a
result of increasing knowledge or ‘new’ fields of interest developed by
travelers? And in which ways did the literature on traveling affect
other areas of knowledge production, either established academic
disciplines or new fields of knowledge?

Topics to be addressed may include:
– The use of travel literature and (national or local) guides. As books
were often too heavy or expensive to carry around during a visit ‘on
the spot’, to what extent and in which way were they consulted
beforehand or afterwards? How did this use beforehand or afterwards
affect the visitors’ experience?
Travel literature and (national or local) guides in relation to travel
accounts. As travel reports were often written after the voyage had
been made, much of the information in them was based on consultation of
guides afterwards. What does that mean for the reliability of travel
accounts?
– What was the impact of the  target audience of (national or local)
guides? What differences can be discerned between guides written in
Latin (obviously for a learned public) and vernacular ones (or
vernacular versions)? To what extent was the kind of information
adapted (expanded, or cut down) to target a wider audience?
– What was the nature and scope of travel reports? Were they in the
first place  a listing of things done and visited or do they reflect
the ‘spiritual enrichment’ that travel theorists such as Lipsius were
writing about? What kind of travel accounts were published and what
kind remained in manuscript, and what does that say about their aim,
function and intended audience?
– How much of the information offered in (national or local) guides was
actually ‘new’? To a large extent, the various guides of a specific
city or region repeated each other. Were they regularly updated with
the inclusion of new monuments (recently finished buildings, modern
works of art, etc.) or with newly acquired information (dates and names
etc.)?
– To what extent have their listings of monuments shaped our present
canon of important art works and ‘not to be missed’ attractions? Are
monuments that were not included (e.g. because they were not (easily)
accessible) still being disregarded, even though they were/are of high
cultural or historical importance?
– The importance of other sources of information besides guides and
travel literature, such as (historical) writings by antique, medieval
and (near) contemporary authors, collections of inscriptions, prints
and book illustrations.

How to submit: Please submit a one-page abstract (ca. 300 words) and a short
curriculum vitae (max. two pages) to both editors, before December 1,
2016:

– Karl Enenkel, Medieval and Early Modern Latin Philology, Westfälische
Wilhelms-Universität, Münster: kenen_01@uni-muenster.de
and
– Jan L. de Jong, History of Early Modern Art, Rijksuniversiteit
Groningen: j.l.de.jong@rug.nl

Applicants will be notified before January 1, 2017. Depending funding,
a conference with all authors is planned to take place in Münster, in
November 2017. Final chapters are due by February 1, 2018.

CFP: Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers

hypnerotomachia-poliphili_1Call for Journal Submissions: Kunsttexte – Renaissance 2016: “Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers”
Deadline: Nov 1, 2016

Some major publishers dominated the publishing scene in the
Renaissance, like Aldo Manuzio and his family in Venice, and the Giunti
family in Florence. From early on however there were many minor
publishers, often very engaged, but successful only for a few years.
These were often intellectuals, who followed special interests in their
publishing policy. In Florence there was Anton Francesco Doni, member
of the literary academy, who published his own works, but also those of
his academy fellows, for example the lessons they presented in the
Academy. His engagement did not lead to financial success and after a
few years he had to stop. In Venice Francesco Sansovino was a
likeminded, who published his own works as well and those of his
friends, and some literary editions. There are numerous examples of
private engagement in printing. We invite papers, which present in an
exemplary way minor printers in the Renaissance (in Italy, France,
Spain, Germany), concentrating on their formation, their printing
policy, their outreach and influence.

How to submit: The articles are due on November 1, 2016, but a short note of interest
would be welcome beforehand.  Papers are welcome in German, English,
French, Italian or Spanish. For more information about the open access
online journal Kunsttexte and for the author guidelines please look at
www.kunsttexte.de.
Please send inquiries and proposals to
Angela Dressen (adressen@itatti.harvard.edu)
Susanne Gramatzki (gramatz@uni-wuppertal.de)

CFP: COMITATUS: A JOURNAL OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES (Deadline: 1st Feb 2016)

FINAL REMINDER:

COMITATUS: A JOURNAL OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES, published annually under the auspices of the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, invites the submission of articles by graduate students and recent PhDs in any field of medieval and Renaissance studies.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR VOLUME 47 (2016): 1 FEBRUARY 2016.

The Comitatus editorial board will make its final selections by early May 2016. Please send submissions as email attachments to Dr. Blair Sullivan, sullivan@humnet.ucla.edu.

Essay Competition: SAIMS/The Medieval Journal

SAIMS/TMJ ESSAY PRIZE

SAIMS invites entries for its annual Essay Competition, submitted according to the following rules:

1. The competition is open to all medievalists who are graduate students or have completed a higher degree within the last three years. For PhD students the time period of three years begins from the date of the successful viva, but excludes any career break. Any candidate in doubt of their eligibility should contact the Director of SAIMS at saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk.

2. A candidate may make only one submission to the competition.

3. The submission must be the candidate’s own work, based on original research, and must not have been previously published or accepted for publication.

4. Submissions are welcomed on any topic that falls within the scope of medieval studies.

5. The submission should be in the English language.

6. The word limit is 8,000 words, including notes, bibliography, and any appendices.

7. The text should be double-spaced, and be accompanied by footnotes with short referencing and a full bibliography of works cited, following the guidelines on the webpage: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims/tmj.htm. An abstract of 200 words should preface the main text.

8. The deadline for submissions is 24 March 2016.

9. The essay must be submitted electronically to saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk, in both Word and pdf formats, to arrive by the deadline.

10. The submission must be accompanied by a completed cover sheet and signed declaration; the template for this is available at http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims/tmj.htm. The candidate’s name should not appear on the submission itself, nor be indicated in any form in the notes.

11. Decisions concerning the Competition lie with the Editors and Editorial Board of The Mediaeval Journal, who can, if they consider there to have been appropriate submissions, award an Essay Prize and in addition declare a proxime accessit. In the unlikely event that, in the judges’ opinion, the material submitted is not of a suitable standard, no prize will be awarded.

12. The value of the Prize is £500.

13. A candidate whose entry is declared proxime accessit will be awarded £100.

14. In addition to the Prize, the winning submission will be published within twelve months in

The Mediaeval Journal, subject to the usual editorial procedures of the journal.

Any queries concerning these rules may be directed to the Director of SAIMS who can be contacted at: Department of Mediaeval History, 71 South Street, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9QW

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims saimsmail@st-andrews.ac.uk