Category Archives: Call for conference session papers

CFP: Italian Art Society at ICMS (Kalamazoo, 10-13 May 2018)

IAS-logoKalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: Apr 21, 2017

Call for Session Proposals: International Congress on Medieval Studies
2018 (Kalamazoo, 10-13 May 2018)

The Italian Art Society seeks session proposals for the annual meeting of the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS). The Congress is an annual gathering of more than 3,000 scholars interested in Medieval Studies, broadly defined. It features more than 550 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops, and performances. The IAS is seeking session proposals that cover Italian art from the fourth through the fifteenth centuries. Members interested in putting together a panel or linked panels should send a brief abstract (250 words max), session title, a short list of potential or desired speakers (they need not be confirmed), the name of the chair(s) with email addresses and affiliation, and a one-page CV. Submit by 21 April 2017 to programs@italianartsociety.org.

CFP: Horses in Art: The Familiar and the Alien Session at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 4 July 2017: 11.15-12.45

Gentile da Fabriano, 15c, detail

Gentile da Fabriano, 15c, detail

IMC 2017: Last minute call for papers

Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 603

Horses in Art: The Familiar and the Alien

Tuesday 4 July 2017: 11.15-12.45

Organiser: Edgar Rops, Faculty of Law, University of Latvia, Riga

Moderator: Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, LASE, Riga (Anastasija.Ropa@lspa.lv)

Horses, omnipresent in the medieval life, make a frequent appearance in medieval art in a variety of forms and guises, referring the viewer to the familiar realities or carrying him or her to the realms of fantasy and alterity. Likewise, the connotations of equines and equestrians differs: from the metaphoric and symbolic to the purely practical, the interaction between horses and humans in visual media channels a variety of meanings. The papers presented in this thematic session on horses in medieval art study the representation of equines in various physical contexts: on tapestries and frescoes, as well as manuscripts.

 

For other sessions still seeking papers at IMC Leeds 2017, see the conference website.

CFP: “‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages,” International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 3rd-6th July 2017

death-medievalCall for Papers: “‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages,” International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 3rd-6th July 2017
Deadline: 23rd September 2016.

**Should this session attract enough interest it will become a three-part series, with each session focussing more deeply on the individual themes of death, disability and disease.

Within late-medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying), disabilities and chronic diseases?

This session will consider the feminisation of death, disability and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying, diseased or disabled). It will hope to consider the contradictory nature of female disease and disability which both engendered an elevated sense of holiness and, conversely, a sense of physical monstrosity; the female response to death, disability and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death, disease and disability dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity?

We welcome multi-disciplinary papers from all geographical locations, c.1300-c.1500, which engage with themes such as (but not limited to): Representations of death, disease and/or (dis)ability; literature either for or by women dealing with the themes of death, disease and/or disability; the tradition of Memento Mori and/or the Danse Macabre; the gendering of ‘Death’; the Black Death’s impact on traditional gender roles; obstetric death; female piety and holy anorexia; the effect of chronic disease and/or disability on late-medieval constructions of masculinity; women and disease (as the developers of cures, writers of recipes, carers or patients, etc.); female use of disability aids and/or prosthetics; and self-inflicted disfigurement.

How to submit: Please send a paper title and an abstract of 100-200 words to Rachael Gillibrand at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds (hy11rg@leeds.ac.uk) by 23rd September 2016.

CFP: Various Sessions @Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, May 11 – 14, 2017

Call for Papers: Various Sessions @Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, May 11 – 14, 2017
Deadline: Sep 15, 2016

Reminder:
The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture
Light and Darkness in Medieval Art, 1200-1450. ICMA sponsored

session

Other Sessions:

Obscured by the Alps: Medieval Italian Architecture and the
European Canon
800px-cathedrale_de_sienne_28duomo_di_siena29Organizer: Erik Gustafson (edg218@nyu.edu)

The traditional canon of European architecture has been well established through both formal-stylistic aesthetics and periodized criteria, rooted ultimately in Hegelian notions of the underlying spirit of an age and Modern nationalist identities. Viewed from northern Europe, the canon’s trajectory moves fluidly from the halcyon
days of Greece and Rome to the stunted but ambitious Early Christian and Byzantine era, developing into the solidly reliable Romanesque
until the revolution of the transcendent Gothic is decapitated by the Renaissance counter-revolution and its florescent Baroque iteration, to
be overshadowed by the enlightened and reasoned Neoclassical age,
leading to the search for identity of the 19th century Historicist
styles and the return to the classically pure clarity of Modernism.
The contributions of the Italian peninsula are periodic, and are
generally defined within the canon by returns to classicism.  In recent
decades, architectural historians have begun to challenge the Italian
canon, expanding its geographic scope from the old Rome-Florence-Venice
vector while also undermining chronological waypoints such as the
Medieval-Renaissance divide.  The canon, however, remains infrangible,
still underwritten by the formalist priorities established at its
inception.

This session seeks to examine the utility of the European canon in
assessing the historical significance of Italian medieval architecture.
Is there more to Italian architectural history than recurrent bouts of
classicism?  How can Italian architecture be understood positively
within the European context, rather than in opposition or subjection to
the canonical narratives?  Possible avenues of inquiry might include
exploring the historiographical lacunae of the canon, considering
alternative criteria for structuring new canonical narratives,
examining socio-cultural phenomena otherwise elided by the canon, or
investigating other historically contingent trends which reflect
different scholarly treatments of Italy and the north.  Medieval
architectural history has been “rethought” several times in the past
decade, bringing “new approaches” to old questions.  Shifting the
discussion, this session seeks papers that ask broad new questions
about medieval architecture’s place in the history of European culture,
grounding such investigations in local Italian contexts. While Italy
has long been obscured by the Alps, this session seeks to begin new
conversations about medieval architecture driven by Italian challenges
to canonical understandings.

How to Submit: Please submit a paper proposal to the organizer, Erik Gustafson
(edg218@nyu.edu)
Deadline: September 15, 2016
Please include the following materials in your application:
1) A one-page abstract
2) Completed Participant Information Form available at the website of
the Medieval Congress:
http://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions
3) A one-page CV

tumblr_m2du3bavab1qkpbfc1The Matter of Ornament
Organizer: Ashley Jones, University of Florida

Ornament has long occupied a troubled position in the history of
western art. Subject to rising and falling fashions, it has been beset
from all sides. Derided as feminine and dismissed as superficial,
ornament has been defined against both classical and modern
austerities. Medieval ornament, like so much of medieval art, has acted
as foil in the grand narratives of the rise and fall of figuration and
abstraction. But broader trends in the history of art and material
culture have, in recent years, highlighted the role medieval objects,
with their simultaneously heightened physicality and spirituality, can
play in illuminating profound questions of the nature of matter and
representation. This panel seeks to add ornament – arguably a
fundamental mode of premodern abstraction – to that equation. It
invites papers drawn from both material and textual traditions that
investigate the intersections of materiality, representationality, and
ornamentality in medieval material culture. Possible topics include but
are not limited to questions of the way in which matter gives rise to
ornament; the way in which matter, such as sacred relics, is made
legible through ornamentation; and the ways in which medieval ornament
evokes both the matter of nature and the matter of the cosmos.

How to Submit:  Paper proposals should consist of the following:
– Abstract of proposed paper (no more than 350 words)
– Completed Participant Information Form – available on the conference
website here:
https://wmich.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/u434/2016/medieval-pif-2017.pdf
– CV with contact information.
ALL PROPOSALS AND INQUIRIES SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO:
Ashley Jones (ajones@arts.ufl.edu)

0cf1189eec15ef93a0058320d627e312The Schematization of time
This session proposes to investigate visual strategies used in
time-reckoning and calendar constructions. Medieval illustrations of
scientific works, computus treatises (including Bede’s De temporum
ratione), historical chronicles, almanacs and moral and theological
tracts, display a vast spectrum of images dealing with the natural and
divine causes of time phenomena, their manifestations, their various
effects on the world and their universal significations. These images
testify to a wide range of subjects and interests, from cosmological
and astronomical explanations, to practical considerations regarding
liturgy, astrology, medicine, divination, prognostication, to history
and geography, to practical and speculative mathematics, and to
symbolic devices working as visual exegesis of the creation. Given the
rich corpus of source material, how might the visualization of time
through schematization and volvelles help us understand the role of
time in medieval life and culture? How did schemata and diagrams
represent specific strategies of knowledge transmission through
geometrical relationships, color systems, and numerical and spatial
representations? Although modern medieval studies witness an increasing
interest in schemata and diagrams, the omnipresence and diversity of
visual reflexions on time in the Middle Ages contrasts with the small
number of case studies dedicated to the subject.

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the
visualization of relationships between time, space and matter; the
schmatization of time in medical theory and practice; the depiction of
liturgical time; the correlation between time-reckoning and celestial
phenomena, either astronomical or astrological; the calculation of past
and future dates through images concerning chronology and eschatology.

How to Apply: The panel features 15-20 minutes papers. Please send an abstract (150
to 350 words), a short CV and completed Participant Information Form to
Arthur Hénaff (arthur.henaff@etu.ephe.fr) and Sarah Griffin
(sarah.griffin@kellogg.ox.ac.uk) by September 15, 2016

CFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature (2 sessions), IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.

edward_iii_of_england_order_of_the_garterCFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature I and II, IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.
Deadline: September 15, 2016

Organizers: Kristin Bourassa and Justin Sturgeon – Centre for Medieval Literature (University of Southern Denmark/University of York) & Canadian Society of Medievalists/Société canadienne des médiévistes

The increased engagement of late-medieval authors in very precise political conversations, and the way these writers justified their interventions in the political sphere by inserting themselves as characters in their own texts and creating authorial personas, have received increased scrutiny from scholars over the last several years. Some of the challenges of studying this literature include 1) the many recognizable genres involved, with individual texts often incorporating characteristics of multiple genres such as mirrors for princes, autobiography, allegory, travel narrative, and letters; and 2) the tendency to group such literature by language and/or modern national borders, making it difficult to consider medieval political literature in the context of the inter-regional conversations in which it often participated.

These three-paper sessions aim to take a broad and interdisciplinary view, using the term “political literature” to denote any form of writing that had the communication of political messages as one of its main goals. This includes visual elements such as images and marginalia, the physical layout of text and image, and the codicological structure of the manuscripts themselves. The sessions aim to open up the field of late medieval political literature and its manuscripts by thinking outside of modern definitions of genre, disciplinary conventions, and so-called “national” borders, with the broad goal of connecting scholars working in this area from different linguistic traditions and from the disciplinary perspectives of history, art history, and literature. Building on an upcoming workshop (March 2017) on late-medieval political literature in France, Burgundy, and England, our aim is to put literature from these regions into conversation with that produced in other areas. By holding two sessions, we hope to attract papers covering a larger variety of languages and geographical locations than could be accomplished with one session alone, and to build a longer-term network of scholars working on this material.

Questions the sessions might address include: How did authors view their own role as contributors to contemporary political conversations? What textual and/or visual tactics did they use to convey their messages? What audiences did they address? To what extent did writers attempt to criticize and/or support individual or institutional power? And how can considering political literature from interdisciplinary, as well as multiple geographical and linguistic traditions help us to better understand the political conversations taking place in a time of significant “international” problems such as the papal schism and the Hundred Years War? We will particularly welcome papers working from interdisciplinary perspectives and that can broaden our geographical scope.

Contact: Kristin Bourassa, kristin@sdu.dk

CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017

20140125-010711CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017
Organiser: Isabella Augart, University of Hamburg, Department of Art History
Deadline: 10th September 2016.

The medieval pilgrimage routes were spaces of cultural and material exchange upon which diverse travellers set off on a common path. The research focus on the link between geography and religion over the last few years has considerably broadened our understanding of medieval art and architecture. The proposed session seeks to provide perspectives on images, church spaces, sacred topographies and material culture of pilgrimage with a regional concentration on the Holy Roman Empire, focusing in particular on the following areas of interest:

  • accounts of pilgrimage journeys in illuminated manuscripts and prints
  • the relation of pilgrimage churches and routes to the surrounding landscape
  • social dimensions of accessibility and mediation in topographies of pilgrimage
  • visual and tactile practices of veneration related to churches and artworks

How to submit: Please send your abstract (max.150-words) for a twenty-minute paper and a short biography to the session organiser (isabella.augart@uni-hamburg.de) before 10th September 2016.

CFP: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017

logomaneyCall for Papers: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017
Deadline: Friday 23 rd September

After a successful outing to the Leeds IMC this summer where the BAA hosted two sessions, the BAA welcomes proposals for further BAA organised sessions next year (July 3 rd -6 th 2017). The IMC’s research theme for 2017 is “Otherness” which I think could be interpreted very successfully by the BAA’s members and relate well to research incorporating material culture.
“Other” could refer to those who are deemed to be other in society (strangers, foreigners, monsters); objects that are unusual, or out of the norm, and could therefore be considered as ‘other’; case studies that do not conform to type; and even topics concerning what is culturally “other” (such as artistic, architectural, and literature styles).
Approaches to this topic could include how “other” is encountered and responded to, or how ‘other’ can be defined and identified.

Suggested topics from the IMC include:
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
Full details of the IMC and their interpretation of ‘other’ and other topic suggestions can be found here:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125137/international_medieval_congress

It is hoped that the BAA can organise several sessions once again, with similar papers grouped together (either methodologically or by subject). Therefore if you do have any ideas about colleagues whose research would complement your own paper, please do include such comments along with your paper’s proposal.

How to Submit: Proposals should consist of a title, and short abstract (50-150 words). Please send paper proposals to hpmahood@gmail.com by Friday 23 rd September. If you have any questions, please do get in touch.