Monthly Archives: March 2019

INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL, London

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow, 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

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CFP: BAA, International Romanesque Conference (14-16 April 2020) Deadline: 15 May, 2019

The British Archaeological Association will hold the sixth in its series of biennial International Romanesque conferences in association with the Dommuseum in Hildesheim on 14-16 April, 2020. The theme is Romanesque and the Year 1000, and the aim is to examine transformation in art and architecture in the years to either side of the millennium.

Despite the complex political situation in late-10th-century Europe, a period marked by chaos in some areas and effective authority in others, the last quarter of the century saw an apparent upsurge in artistic production in the Empire, southern Britain, Lombardy and the Mediterranean. The decades after the millennium have left a larger residue of work, notably in France, but were the 1020s artistically more dynamic than the 980s? How might we describe the cultural climate of the Latin West between c.970 and c.1030? Proposals for papers concerned with the above are welcome, as are those that review individual patrons, particularly in establishing workshops and developing expertise. The period sees remarkable developments in iconography and stylistic expression. It sees portable monumental and devotional statues come into being, along with the application of novel, or at least re-understood, architectural forms. Does the interest in architectural ‘articulation’ initiate a new understanding of the expressive potential of architecture? How good is the evidence for monumental wall painting, what is the state of knowledge on scriptoria as centres of artistic production c.1000, what conditions gave rise to the proliferation of ‘First Romanesque’ architecture, how important was Rome, what was the impact of objects from the Carolingian past or Byzantine present, and what are we to make of the apparent disparities between artistically ‘active’ areas and artistically ‘inactive’ areas? The period also sees a boom in the production of three-dimensional objects, with the revival of bronze-casting, the re-emergence of architectural relief sculpture and he production of monumental sculpture. The conference is geographically international, though the date brackets of c.970-c.1030 will be strictly applied.

The Conference will take place at the Dommuseum in Hildesheim from 14-16 April. There will also be an opportunity to stay on for two days of visits to buildings in the surrounding area on the 17 and 18 April.

Proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes in length should be sent to the convenors, John McNeill and Gerhard Lutz, on romanesque2020@thebaa.org by 15 May, 2019.

Papers should be in English.

Decisions on acceptance will be made by 31 May.

Society for Court Studies research and publication bursaries, deadline 15 March

Munich crownThe Society for Court Studies is launching biannual research and publication bursaries worth £250 each. The bursaries are available to all postgraduate and early career (within six years of PhD award) researchers working in the field of court studies. The deadline for applying is Friday 15 March. To apply for an award please send a statement of up to 250 words outlining your research, and the use to which you would put the award, to Joanna Tinworth (jtinworth@soane.org.uk). For more information, please click here.

Scholarship: British Archeological Association Shrewsbury Conference 2019

Student Scholarships available for the British Archeological Association’s Shrewsbury Conference, 15-19 July, 2019

BAAThe 2019 BAA Conference will explore the art, architecture and archaeology of medieval Shrewsbury and north Shropshire. Lectures will include papers on subjects as varied as late Roman Shropshire, Shrewsbury’s medieval topography, the patronage, art, architecture and archaeology of medieval churches in and around Shrewsbury, stone sculpture, alabasters, roof bosses, seals, and nineteenth-century antiquarianism.

Site visits will include St Mary’s, St Alkmund, Bear Steps, the Town Walls and Shrewsbury Abbey, while there will be two coach excursions (one full & one half-day) outside Shrewsbury. These will encompass Acton Burnell (church and castle), Wenlock Priory, Buildwas Abbey, Haughmond Abbey, Atcham, Shifnal, and Tong.

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CFP: St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference (6-8 June, 2019)

St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference

6 – 8 June, 2019

Deadline: 31 March, 2019

K104208

The British Library, Egerton 2899, Psalter of the Gallican Version, Scotland, 15th century, f. 30, detail.

We are announcing a call for papers for the second St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) Graduate Conference. This three-day conference is aimed at graduate students and early career researchers in any area of Medieval Studies. The second day of the conference will be devoted to the theme Politics and Political Thought and we would particularly welcome abstracts related to this topic from scholars working in any of the fields mentioned below. We aim to encompass a range of historical perspectives, from art to archeology, law to literature.

The keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Carole Hillenbrand (Edinburg & St Andrews) and Dr Charles West (Sheffield).

Proposals relating to the following fields of research are especially welcome:

  • Eastern Mediterranean studies
  • Art and architecture
  • The church and religious life
  • Crusading
  • Late Antiquity
  • Latin poetry
  • Law
  • Middle Eastern studies
  • Philosophy
  • Rulership and lordship
  • Scottish history
  • Texts and manuscripts

It is anticipated that there shall be no registration free and that some travel bursaries will be available. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length.

Please email 250-word abstracts to saimsgraduateconference@gmail.com by 31st March 2019.

CONF: Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics

Conference & Poetry Reading: Remembering the Middle Ages?

April 5-6, 2019

2 Locations:

Bush House, Aldwych, King’s College London
The London Global Gateway, 1-4 Suffolk Street, University of Notre Dame

A partnership between the University of Notre Dame (London Global Gateway) and King’s College London, ‘Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics’ asks speakers and attendees to consider how the concept of a ‘cultural memory’ of the Middle Ages can be useful (or not) in understanding how and why scholars, artists, readers, and others have resourced or imagined the Middle Ages, in any post-medieval period. We ask participants to interrogate the linguistic, material, and social networks that have been created by medieval things over time. Haruko Momma (University of Toronto) and Sarah Salih (King’s College London) will give a keynote panel, and the event also includes a reading featuring poets Vahni Capildeo and Ian Duhig and chaired by Professor Clare Lees (Director of the Institute for English Studies). Further details are forthcoming at our website: http://sites.nd.edu/remembering-the-middle-ages.

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Workshop: Manipulating the Sun (Wuppertal, 21-23 Aug 19)

Manipulating the Sun: Picturing Astronomical Miracles from the Bible in the Early Modern Era

Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies

August 21 – 23, 2019

Deadline: Mar 17, 2019

Royal 20 B.XX, f.3

The British Library, Royal 20 B XX, f. 3,  c. 1420, “Astronomy and Geometry”

The workshop is being organized by the research project Iconography of the Imagery on Early Modern Scientific Instruments (funded by the German Research Foundation, DFG).

One of the aspects being analysed in the project is biblical imagery that could be related to astronomy. Of particular interest is imagery that was used to argue against the Copernican system from the mid-16th century such as the miracles of the Sun reversing its course in II Kings 20:8-11/Isaiah 38:8 (Horologium Ahas) and the Sun standing still in Joshua 10:12.

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