Monthly Archives: October 2017

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

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CFP: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018

smrs_logo_emailCall for Papers: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018
Deadline: December 31

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation on all topics and in all disciplines of the medieval and early modern worlds.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned dormitory rooms and a luxurious boutique hotel.

The plenary speakers for this year will be Geoffrey Parker, of The Ohio State University, and Carole Hillenbrand, of the University of St Andrews.

For more information, click here.

CFP: NUME, Research Group on the Latin Middle Ages, 4th Cycle, Florence, 3-7th June 2018

logoconscritta_1537385121_2306Call for Papers: NUME, Research Group on the Latin Middle Ages, 4th Cycle, June 2018

NUME, Research Group on the Latin Middle Ages, organizes the IV Cycle of Medieval Studies, June 2018.

The goal is to offer a broad overview of the current situation of Italian and international medievalist studies. Issues which are related to many different aspects of the medieval period (V-XV century) can be addressed: history, philosophy, politics, literature, art, archeology, material culture, new technologies applied to medieval studies and so on;
Contributions with two or more speakers are accepted;
Contributions will be structured in specific panels.

The conference will be held from 3rd to 7th June 2018 at the Auditorium Ente Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, via Folco Portinari, 5 (Florence, Italy).

How to apply” Participation proposals must have abstract format, in Italian or English, not exceeding 300 words. They will have to be sent, along with a CV, by January 15, 2018 at the following e-mail address:
info@nuovomedioevo.it

Proposals will be evaluated by the Review Board on the basis of quality, interest and originality. The judgment of the Commission will be unquestionable.

The Commission will notify the convocation for the speakers considered suitable by February 1, 2018.

The selected speakers will be asked to prepare an oral intervention, accompanied by any images or videos, not exceeding 15 minutes (+5’ discussion time). Contextually, they will be asked to send a paper of their contribution for the Conference Proceedings by April 1, 2018.

Speakers will be required a participation fee of 100€, which, in addition to supporting the activities of the NUME Research Group, will entitle to 2 free copies of the Conference Proceedings.

The Conference program will be published by April 30, 2018.

The deadlines set out in this notice must be strictly observed, otherwise the contribution will be excluded from the call.

Further info at: www.nuovomedioevo.it

CFP: The Byzantine tradition of Church embroidery in the Mediterranean and the Slavic World (1200-1800), thematic issue of Cahiers Balkaniques (INALCO)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACall for Submissions: The Byzantine tradition of Church embroidery in the Mediterranean and the Slavic World (1200-1800)
Deadline: 28 February 2018

This thematic issue of Cahiers Balkaniques (INALCO), which appears in 2019, celebrates the Byzantine tradition of Church embroidery and its various afterlives. It aims at investigating its evolution within the sphere of Byzantium’s cultural influence and beyond, with a chronological scope which begins from the Late Middle Ages and stretches until the 19thcentury, when artisanal productions begin to decline.

We welcome proposals on the following subjects:

– The different aspects of Byzantine ecclesiastical embroidery and its artistic and technical evolutions.
– Embroidery techniques and iconographies transmitted from West and/or East.
– The relationship between Byzantine/post-Byzantine productions and the Christian Orient (ex. Armenia, Georgia).
– The management of Byzantine heritage in the Slavic World.
– Italian-Greek borderland productions (ex. the Ionian Islands).
– The circulation of Byzantine embroideries overseas (Italy, Eastern Europe and beyond).
– Christian embroidery in Egypt and the Levant.

Proposals by junior and senior researchers will be equally considered with priority being given to original research, whether based on technical analysis, iconographical interpretation or textual evidence. Subjects which favor interdisciplinarity are particularly welcome. The volume will be bilingual (French and English) and will appear in print in 2019.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to epapastavrou@yahoo.gr; mariellereber@bluewin.ch

Guest editors:
Elena Papastavrou
Marielle Martiniani-Reber

CFP: Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art, Graduate Conference, Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, November 15 – 16, 2018

longform-original-10978-1418143091-9Call for Papers: Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art, Graduate Conference, Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, November 15 – 16, 2018
Deadline: January 31, 2018.

Advanced students currently enrolled in a Doctoral (Ph.D.) program are invited to submit a proposal for a paper to be presented at “Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art;” this international workshop will be held on 15-16 November 2018 at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. The event is organized by Diletta Gamberini (Italian Literature, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), Jonathan Nelson (Art History, Syracuse University in Florence), and Alessandro Nova (Art History, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut).

For the first time, “Bad Reception” sets out to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplinary fields to discuss the phenomenon of the negative reception of Italian art and architecture, as expressed across a broad spectrum of responses written during the long Cinquecento (late 15th to early 17th century). Scholarly literature has generally focused on individual case studies, or else on the specific inflections of negative criticism in codified literary writings, such as vituperative poems on art. The present workshop seeks to advance the current state of scholarship by exploring the intersections of different genres of texts that were used to criticize paintings, sculptures, and architectures (e.g. artistic literature, epistolography, poetry, memorialistic, and archival documents), and by seeing the impact these discourses had on the afterlife of the art under discussion.

We ask participants to consider one or more of the following points, ideally in reference to several different examples:

– What were the conventions used for criticizing works of art? What were their literary and art-historical sources and models? And how did such conventions evolve over the period under examination?
– How did the criticism articulated by one type of textual discourse (e.g. vituperative poetry) interfere with the form, contents and scope of negative comments to artworks made in different genres?
– On what aspects of the works of art did the critic mostly focus (e.g. lack of decorum, verisimilitude, iconography, technical skill, beauty)?
– What were the consequences of the negative evaluations for the artistic product itself and/or for its author (e.g. revision, rejection, removal, or destruction of the artwork; reduced status of the artist; different forms of reply to the comments)?

The workshop will consist of a series of 25-minutes papers, either in English or Italian, given by senior and junior scholars. Publication of the contributions to the “Bad Reception” workshop will be decided after the event. The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz will provide funding toward the cost of travelling and accommodation for accepted speakers.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in a Doctoral program; dissertation topics need to have been formally accepted. Proposals, written in English or Italian, must include the following information:
1. Academic Summary (university level only): a) name and address of current institution, b) short description of PhD dissertation (200-300 words), c) expected date of completion, d) name and email address of advisor(s).
2. Professional Summary: a list of relevant work experience and/or publications.
3. Proposal: title, and short description (200-300 words).

Interested applicants should send their proposal, in a single file (PDF),
to sekr_nova@khi.fi.it by January 31, 2018.

Conference: The Body Politics of Mary Magdalen, November 23 – 24, 2017, The Warburg Institute, London

carlo_crivelli_-_maria_magdalena_001Conference: The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London, WC1H 0AB, November 23 – 24, 2017

The Warburg Institute is holding a two-day conference on Mary Magdalen, a figure of great historical importance and cultural resonance. Coming together for this free event, the multidisciplinary speakers will present new research on the representation of her body and its discourses across time and space.
Registration: bit.ly/Mary-Mag

PROGRAMME
Thursday 23 November 2017
5.30pm Welcome and Introduction

Conference keynote:
Penny Jolly (Skidmore College)
“Addressing and Undressing the Female Body in the Magdalene Chapel at San Francesco, Assisi”
Supported by the Coffin Trust, University of London

Reception

Friday 24 November 2017
10am Registration and Coffee
10.30am Welcome and Introduction

Session 1: Chair – Zoe Opacic (Birkbeck)
10.45am
Paper 1: Joan Taylor (KCL)
What did Mary Magdalen look like?
11.30am
Paper 2: Joanne Anderson (WI)
Materialising the Body of the Saint: Pilgrimage Politics and Art

12.15-1.30pm Lunch (for speakers and chairs only)

Session 2: Chair – Rose Marie San Juan (UCL)

1.30pm
Paper 3: Diane Apostolos-Cappadona (Georgetown)
“An ‘athlete of God’ or simply naked?: The Magdalene in the Wilderness from Isenbrandt to Etty”

2.15pm
Paper 4: Francesco Ventrella (Sussex)
Morelli’s Magdalen and the Sexual Politics of Reading

Tea/Coffee – all delegates

Session 3: Chair – Rose Marie San Juan (UCL)

3.30pm
Paper 5: Lucy Bolton (QMUL)
Beautiful repentant whore: Mary Magdalen, Movie Star

4.15pm
Paper 6: Henrietta Simpson (Slade School of Art, UCL)
The Implications of Absence: Mary Magdalen and the Wilderness Landscape

5pm Roundtable chaired by Michelle O’Malley (WI)

6.15-7.30pm
Magdalena. A Portrait in Song of One of Christianity’s Most Beloved Sinners
Joglaresa. Director: Belinda Sykes
Supported by the Coffin Trust, University of London
The Warburg Institute Lecture Room. Refreshments provided

Job: Assistant Professor of Art and Material Culture of the Islamic World, University of California, Riverside,

ucr-sealJob: Assistant Professor of Art and Material Culture of the Islamic World, University of California, Riverside
Deadline: Dec 1, 2017
Starting Date: July 1, 2018

Salary: Commensurate with education and experience
Application Procedure: The Department of the History of Art at the University of California, Riverside invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor in Art and Material Culture of the Islamic World. The department is searching for an energetic candidate whose teaching and research interests focus on Islamic Art, Architecture, and Material Cultures in the wider Mediterranean World, the Middle East, and Central and South East Asia, from the medieval period to the 20th century. The candidate will be versed in the most advanced theoretical and methodological concerns of the field, have competency in the languages the specialization requires, and will develop and offer courses that serve the Department of Art History. Collaborations with UCR’s program for Middle Eastern and Islam Studies are encouraged.
Potential for teaching excellence and teaching experience and a promising record of research and publication are required. Ph.D. required at time of appointment. Salary will be commensurate with education and experience. Position begins July 1, 2018.
Review of completed applications will begin December 1, 2017, and continue until the position is filled.

Submit materials electronically via url: https://aprecruit.ucr.edu/apply/JPF00808
Candidates must submit a letter of application, a research statement, curriculum vitae, writing sample (30 pages maximum), evidence of teaching, a statement of contributions to diversity, and three letters of recommendation.

Applicants who use Interfolio may utilize a feature provided by the Interfolio Service to allow Interfolio to upload their letters directly into AP Recruit. Applicants can input an Interfolio-generated email address in place of their letter writer’s email address. Interfolio refers to this as Online Application Deliveries. The following link on the Interfolio website shows how to set this up. http://help.interfolio.com/entries/24062742-Uploading-Letters-to-an-Online-Application-System.
For further information, please contact the Islamic Art and Material Culture Search Committee at arthistory@ucr.edu.
Advancement through the faculty ranks at the University of California is through a series of structured, merit-based evaluations, occurring every 2-3 years, each of which includes substantial peer input.
UCR is a world-class research university with an exceptionally diverse undergraduate student body. Its mission is explicitly linked to providing routes to educational success for underrepresented and first-generation college students. A commitment to this mission is a preferred qualification.
The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.