Monthly Archives: July 2016

CFP: The Idea of Luxury and the Role of the Object, ICMS, Kalamazoo, May 2017

Call for Papers: The Idea of Luxury and the Role of the Object

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017

Organizers: Andrew Sears, University of California, Berkeley; Laura Tillery, University of Pennsylvania

As Christopher Berry has shown in The Idea of Luxury, the concept of luxury is determined by countless factors: it is situated by socio-economic forces, enacted politically, and both justified and critiqued by philosophy and theology. Luxury is also a difficult scholarly concept to contend with, requiring close engagement with these aforementioned fields as well as distance from our own modern judgments and conceptualizations.

Our panel seeks to integrate physical objects within such epistemological studies and consider anew the vital role of Art History. We hope to use artworks to reevaluate some fundamental questions: what is luxury, how is it manifested in physical terms, and what are its functions for patrons, makers, and beholders? We also hope to bring to the fore new questions about the role of luxury objects in shaping scholarly questions and Art History as a discipline, dealing with the nature of the canon, the extant corpus of objects, and the role of collecting practices through time. Indeed, in today’s economic climate, it seems time to consider luxury’s history, our relationship to it, and what art historical lines of inquiry can bring to bear on cultural commentary.

We welcome papers in various stages of research, and across geographic, temporal, and material contexts. Potential topics include: the aesthetics of luxury; material treatises and the physical makeup of luxury; unexpected luxuries; church treasuries; notions of excess, and objects that warn against, or perhaps embody, luxuria and avaritia; commissioning, owning, and displaying luxuries; history and historiography of luxury; luxury and domesticity; luxury and gender; collecting luxuries.

To propose a paper, please send an abstract, C.V., and completed Congress Participant Information Form (available on the Congress website) to Andrew Sears (asears@berkeley.edu) and Laura Tillery (tillery@sas.upenn.edu) no later than 15 September 2016.

 

 

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CFP: Digital Reconstructions: Italian Buildings and their Decorations, ICMS, Kalamazoo, May 2017

Call for Papers: Digital Reconstructions: Italian Buildings and their Decorations

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017

Organizers: Amy Gillette (Temple University) and Kaelin Jewell (Temple University)

Sponsored by the Italian Art Society

Historians of medieval architecture have productively used digital technologies to reimagine lost monuments or furnishings, reveal aspects of correspondence in pictorial and architectural iconography, decipher construction techniques, determine the nature and scope of collaboration between architects and decorators, and grapple with the ways in which medieval people experienced their three-dimensional, functional spaces. Digital reconstruction is also useful for bridging monuments and their modern publics—for instance, the Scuola San Marco in Venice has installed virtual “copies” of dispersed paintings in the Albergo, so that visitors can readily apprehend its original presentation. This panel seeks a program of digital reconstructions of medieval Italian architectural spaces, ranging from the 4th to the early 15th centuries CE, including chapels, refectories, churches, palace rooms, libraries, and/or villas. We welcome projects that digitally reconstruct vanished monuments, interiors of standing churches with reconstituted medieval screening systems, liturgical furnishings, and/or picture programs. We are particularly interested in projects that take a critical approach to these virtual spaces and address the choice of historical moment(s) and types of monuments, in addition to the reconstruction’s purpose and technological considerations. Speakers are encouraged to comment on the impact on the scholarly process, collaboration (including with non-art historians), teaching, museum practice, and conservation or preservation.

The deadline for 15-minute paper proposals is: September 15, 2016

Please send the abstract of your proposed paper (300 words maximum), CV with current contact information, and completed Participant Information Form, available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions to the organizers: Amy Gillette (amy.gillette@temple.edu) and Kaelin Jewell (kaelin.jewell@temple.edu)

 

CFP: Global Byzantium: 50th Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies (University of Birmingham, 25–27 March 2017)

Call for Communications: Global Byzantium: 50th Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies

Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies
University of Birmingham

25-27 March 2017

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For its 50th anniversary, the Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies returns to the University of Birmingham, where it began in 1967. On this anniversary of the discipline we ask what the language of globalism has to offer to Byzantine studies, and Byzantine studies to global narratives. How global was Byzantium? Our understanding of the links which Byzantium had to far-flung parts of the world, and of its connections with near neighbours, continues to develop but the significance of these connections to Byzantium and its interlocutors remains keenly debated. Comparisons from or to Byzantium may also help in thinking about globalism, modern and historical. How, for example, might Byzantine legal structures, visual culture or military practice contribute to debates about the role of the medieval state or the relationship between modern cultural and national identities? Finally, Byzantine studies has always been an international discipline, marked by the interaction of its different national, regional and linguistic traditions of scholarship, as well as its highly interdisciplinary nature. How has this manifested in the interpretation of Byzantine history and how might practices of global scholarship be pursued in the future? The 50th Spring Symposium invites contributions for communications on any of these themes and warmly invites abstracts from scholars outside the UK and in fields linked to Byzantine studies.

The call for communications is now open. If you would like to offer a 10-minute communication on the theme of the symposium, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words to Daniel Reynolds at d.k.reynolds@bham.ac.uk by 1 September 2016.

Successful submissions will be informed no later than 1 October 2016. Some bursaries will be available to selected speakers, especially to attendees from outside the UK. If you would like to be considered for a bursary please indicate this on your abstract and we will send you further information about the application process if appropriate.

For more information, see: http://www.byzantium.ac.uk/events/spring-symposium-2017.html

CFP: Image & Meaning in Medieval Manuscripts: Sessions in Honor of Adelaide Bennett Hagens (Two Sessions, International Congress on Medieval Studies)

Call for Papers: Image & Meaning in Medieval Manuscripts: Sessions in Honor of Adelaide Bennett Hagens

Session I: Text-Image Dynamics in Medieval Manuscripts

Session II: Signs of Patronage in Medieval Manuscripts

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017

Organized by Judith Golden and Jessica Savage, Index of Christian Art, Princeton University

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Session I: Text-Image Dynamics in Medieval Manuscripts

This session invites papers that examine the interaction between words and images in medieval manuscripts as they shape the reader-viewer’s experience of the book. How do texts and images interact on the page? How did medieval readers respond to the varied discourses between images and texts? This session endeavors to open up new perspectives in describing, analyzing, and contextualizing manuscript illumination. Speakers may address the topic of visual rhetoric and how images communicate meaning with accompanying text, image-text composition, and the recovery of the reader’s experience through text and iconography. Also of interest is the role of images and their intrinsic or peripheral textual elements (including rubrics, captions, mottos, names, initials, labels, titles, instructions, votives, quotations, speech scrolls, pseudo-inscriptions and other types of inscriptions), as well as that of formal text or paratextual elements, in elucidating meaning and engaging the viewer. Speakers may consider case studies of particular manuscripts or present analyses addressing broad iconographic trends.

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Session II: Signs of Patronage in Medieval Manuscripts

This session invites papers that examine the many varied “visual signatures” of manuscript patrons, including the dress, gestures, posture, and attributes of donor figures; heraldry and personalized inscriptions; marginal notes, colophons, dedications, and other signs of ownership and use. Building on scholarship presented in the 2013 Index conference Patronage: Power and Agency in Medieval Art, this session seeks papers that will investigate the dynamic system of patronage centered on the interaction of owners with their books (whether as creator, patron, commissioner, or reader-viewer). Speakers may also investigate the importance of gender and social roles in book production, use, and readership or the role of patron as instigator in the process of book creation, from payment to design.

 

Adelaide Bennett Hagens is retiring from the Index of Christian Art at Princeton University after fifty years of dedicated research and scholarship. She studied under Robert Branner at Columbia University and joined the Index during the directorship of Rosalie Green. Adelaide has studied medieval art in a variety of media, but her passion at the Index and in her personal research has always been manuscript illumination, particularly of the Gothic period. Her publications include “Some Perspectives on the Origins of Books of Hours in France in the Thirteenth Century,” in Books of Hours Reconsidered, edited by Sandra Hindman and James H. Marrow (2013); “Making Literate Lay Women Visible: Text and Image in French and Flemish Books of Hours, 1220–1320,” in Thresholds of Medieval Visual Culture: Liminal Spaces, edited by Elina Gertsman and Jill Stevenson (2012); and “The Windmill Psalter: The Historiated Letter E of Psalm One,” Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 43 (1980). In two sessions, we celebrate Adelaide’s accomplishments and recognize her contributions to the Index of Christian Art and to the wider medieval and academic community.

Inspired by Adelaide’s continued interest in new research, we would particularly welcome submissions from emerging scholars in manuscript studies to share projects that reflect new developments and chart future possible courses for the field.

The deadline for paper proposals is: 15 September 2016

Please send the abstract of your proposed paper (300 words maximum), CV with current contact information, and completed Participant Information Form (available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to the organizers: Judith Golden (jkgolden@princeton.edu) and Jessica Savage (jlsavage@princeton.edu)

Job: Research Associate: Impact of the Ancient City ERC Project (Urban Ideals in the Islamic World), University of Cambridge

Job: Research Associate: Impact of the Ancient City ERC Project (Urban Ideals in the Islamic World)

University of Cambridge, Faculty of Classics

Limit of Tenure: 4 years from 01 January 2017 (or as soon as possible thereafter)

Applications are sought for a Research Associate who will be one of four postdoctoral researchers on the ERC funded ‘Impact of the Ancient City’ project led by the Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill. The project will re-examine the impact of the ancient, Greco-Roman city on subsequent urban history in Europe and the Islamic world, investigating both the urban fabric and urban ideals. Bringing together researchers trained in historical, archaeological and literary analysis, the project spans the entire Mediterranean region from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present day. The research team will investigate case histories in the western and the eastern Mediterranean, and pose a set of questions about how urban forms responded to changing social needs. A full description of the project is available.

The role of the Islamic World Research Associate is to re-examine perceptions of the ancient, Greco-Roman city in the Islamic world. The successful candidate will assemble and study examples of literary engagement with the physical traces of the Greco-Roman city, but will also consider the ways in which the inhabitants of the ‘Islamic city’ reconfigured this past. The Research Associate’s task will be to focus on how the Islamic urban imaginary grew in part from the Byzantine, and how awareness of the Greco-Roman city was mediated by its Christian successor, nourished by accumulated re-readings of inherited urban spaces and buildings.

The successful candidate is expected to work as part of a team based in Cambridge, discussing findings and problems with the other members of the project team. The successful candidate will be expected to spend up to three months in each of the first three years of research on fieldwork visits for the case studies, as well as taking part in regular meetings and seminars in Cambridge, and the three annual conferences. They will publish the results of their research within the publication programme of the project.

Closing date: Noon Monday 12th September 2016

Planned interview date: mid October 2016

Vacancy Reference: GE09653

For information on how to apply, see: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10937/

Job: Research Associate: Impact of the Ancient City ERC Project (Eastern Mediterranean), University of Cambridge

Job: Research Associate: Impact of the Ancient City ERC Project (Eastern Mediterranean)

University of Cambridge, Faculty of Classics

Limit of Tenure: 4 years from 01 January 2017 (or as soon as possible thereafter)

Applications are sought for a Research Associate who will be one of four postdoctoral researchers on the ERC funded ‘Impact of the Ancient City’ project led by the Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill. The project will re-examine the impact of the ancient, Greco-Roman city on subsequent urban history in Europe and the Islamic world, investigating both the urban fabric and urban ideals. Bringing together researchers trained in historical, archaeological and literary analysis, the project spans the entire Mediterranean region from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present day. The research team will investigate case histories in the western and the eastern Mediterranean, and pose a set of questions about how urban forms responded to changing social needs. A full description of the project is available at here.

This Research Associate will examine the resilience of the urban fabric in the eastern Mediterranean, tracing the impact of ancient forms on subsequent Byzantine and Islamic configurations, with special attention to the different trajectories of particular cities. The successful candidate will select his or her own case studies that will range across the Eastern Mediterranean, excluding Greece and Constantinople/Istanbul, but including Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Palestine and Egypt.

The successful candidate is expected to work as part of a team based in Cambridge, discussing findings and problems with the other members of the project team. The successful candidate will be expected to spend up to three months in each of the first three years of research on fieldwork visits for the case studies, as well as taking part in regular meetings and seminars in Cambridge, and the three annual conferences. They will publish the results of their research within the publication programme of the project.

Closing date: Noon Monday 12th September 2016

Planned interview date: mid October 2016

Vacancy Reference: GE09649

For information on how to apply, see: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10933/

CFP: Networks of Books and Readers in the Medieval Mediterranean, ICMS, Kalamazoo, May 2017

Call for Papers: Networks of Books and Readers in the Medieval Mediterranean:
“Networks of Books and Readers in the Medieval Mediterranean I: Books” and “Networks of Books and Readers in the Medieval Mediterranean II: Readers”

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017

Organized by Núria Silleras-Fernandez (Spanish and Portuguese, University of Colorado at Boulder) and sponsored by the CU Mediterranean Studies Group and the Mediterranean Seminar.

These sessions address the study of networks of books and readers in the Medieval Mediterranean. How did texts and ideas circulate in a Mediterranean context? What types of motifs, topics, and ideas travelled? What books were translated and why? Were there Mediterranean networks of readers who circulated particular texts? These two panels, one focusing on books and the other on readers, seek papers of a comparative, interdisciplinary and/or methodologically innovative nature that focus on how members of various faith and ethnic communities circulated texts and ideas in the broader Mediterranean.

Contact Núria Silleras-Fernandez  (silleras@colorado.edu) for further information or to submit a proposal (300-word abstract, one-page CV, and media equipment request by 15 September 2016).