Monthly Archives: March 2016

University of York MA in Stained Glass Conservation and Heritage Management

hoa-glassgreen

The University of York’s MA in Stained Glass Conservation and Heritage Management is pleased to announce the numerous scholarship and funding opportunities available for students starting in September 2016.

This MA is the only course in Britain for the study of stained glass conservation and remains the only programme in the English-speaking world.  York has unmatched resources in the Minster and city churches, its leading conservation studios and the Department’s lively Stained Glass Research School. This innovative programme offers an integrated study of stained glass and its conservation. Taught in partnership with the Department of Archaeology, the programme provides training for a variety of employment in stained glass conservation workshops, cultural heritage management, arts administration, administration of historic buildings and museums, and for higher research degrees.

We are happy to announce that The York Glaziers Trust will be celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2017, and as part of its celebrations will be awarding one MA in Stained Glass student entering in 2016 a £10,000 scholarship for the two year programme (open to UK/EU/Overseas applicants).  There will also be funding available from the Worshipful Company of Glaziers, NADFAS (National Association of Decorative and Fine Art Societies) and we will be announcing some further scholarships soon.

Stained Glass students are also eligible to apply for the following History of Art scholarships: WRoCAH Research Preparation Masters scholarships and the Ede & Ravenscroft Bridge Scholarship in History of Art (Please note that these scholarships will only apply to Year 1 of the SG MA). Details of these two scholarships can be found here. 2016 also sees the introduction of the New Postgraduate Loans Scheme. There is also a York Graduate Loyalty Discount for continuing York students. A full list of overseas funding opportunities can be found here.

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Call for Papers: Mapping urban changes (Dubrovnik, 20-22 Sep 2017)

dubrovnik-conrad-von-grunenberg1468Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 20 – 22, 2017
Deadline: Sep 5, 2016

The aim of this scientific workshop is to compare and discuss
methodologies of visualisation of the results achieved within the urban
history research. The intention is to gather researchers from different disciplines, like art and architectural history, urban development studies, geographical history, economic, social and political history
and archaeology, who would present their work. We are looking for papers dealing with the physical changes of urban tissue, its buildings or open spaces as well as those investigating the changes of the ways they were used, perceived or governed. The research could be based on
archival data, literary sources, old maps and city views or examination of the physical realm. The visualisations of these results realised through analytic maps, especially those made with the use of GIS programs or improved with 3D models are most welcomed, as well as any other methodology applied. The discussion will be focused on possibilities, obstacles, limits and achievements of these methodologies in the improvement of understanding and dissemination of the research results.

The scientific workshop is organized within the project Dubrovnik: Civitas et Acta Consiliorum. Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric founded by Croatian Science Foundation; see more at ducac.ipu.hr . The papers will be published as e-book at the project web pages by the beginning of the workshop.

Keywords: mapping, visualisation, urban history
Period: Medieval, Early Modern, Modern

Organizers: Ana Plosnić Škarić and Danko Zelić, ducac project, Croatian
Science Foundation
Scientific Committee: Donatella Calabi, Alessandra Ferrighi, Nada
Grujić, Ana Marinković, Ana Plosnić Škarić, Danko Zelić

Location: Croatia, Dubrovnik, CAAS
Working Language: English

Abstracts Due to: 5 September 2016: in English, up to 300 words with
title; with name, affiliation, address and a CV up to 150 words
Notification of paper acceptance: 25 September 2016

Full Texts Paper Submissions Due to: 31 March 2017: c. 5000 words, in
English, Italian, French, German or Croatian

Call for Session Proposal: Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture

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As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 11–14, 2017. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.
Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (http://www.maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/52nd-international-congress-on-medieval-studies). The deadline for submission is April 25, 2016. Proposals should include:
*Title
*Session abstract (300 words)
*Intellectual justification for the proposed session (300 words)
*Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session presider)
*CV
The session organizer may act as the presider or present a paper.
Successful applicants will be notified by May 6, 2016, if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress.
If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and presider) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.
Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Call for Papers and Panels: Medieval & Early Modern Festival (17-18 June, University of Kent, Canterbury)

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About the Festival

The Medieval and Early Modern Studies Summer Festival, to be held at the University of Kent at Canterbury, is a two-day celebration of all research in the Medieval and Early Modern periods, including the study of religion, politics, history, art, drama, literature, and everyday culture of different nations.

The festival is designed to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines, academic schools and institutions in order to foster conversations, build a greater sense of community, and develop a research network for all masters and PhD postgraduate students and academic staff within the South-East of England.

As a discipline, medieval and early modern studies is inherently interdisciplinary. It encompasses such a length of time and breadth of subjects that scholars and students often find themselves dispersed, situated in different departments and lacking a cohesive identity or space in which to interact. The festival therefore allows many students and staff that may never otherwise encounter one another to share their research and ideas. This event is essential to the building of a strong and supportive postgraduate environment for current and prospective students across the universities.

This event is jointly sponsored by the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Kent, the Consortium for the Humanities of the Arts South-East England, and the Eastern Arc Research Consortium.

British Museum Handling Session: Micro-architecture

In February 2015 Lloyd de Beer and Naomi Speakman kindly permitted Courtauld staff and students to examine micro-architectural objects in the British Museum.

We saw two wonderful ivories with fairly generic Gothic baldachins, along with this extraordinary 10c (?) ivory cylinder with Passion narratives. This 12c censer cover is an especially wonderful example of dozens of similar objects, and later metalwork objects included this 15c Swiss shrine and this early 14c casket with French and English heraldry. Then there was a whole group of seals, including this from Langdon Priory, this remarkable 1322 seal impression from Cottingham Abbey, and this 13c double-sided seal matrix from Scotland. Finally we looked at this very curious lead object showing the Annunciation in an  elaborate architectural setting:

badge

Amongst others, we asked the following questions in relation to these objects:

1) does the object relate to ‘real’ buildings (if so, are these necessarily contemporary, and has this assumption been used to date the object?)
2) Does the architecture carry any specific symbolic/iconographic/representational meaning?
3) Is there evidence for setting out of the architecture (compass points, lines etc), which might reveal the setting out process (and, potentially, the role of drawing)
4) Is scale especially relevant to the object?
5) Might the object feasibly transmit architectural designs (and was it produced in quantity?)?
6) Does the object shed light on relations between masons/metalworkers etc?

In preparation for the session we held a Reading Group focused on the following texts:

  • Achim Timmerman, ‘Multum in parvo: Microarchitecture in the Medieval West, c. 800-1550’, In: Richard Etlin, ed, The Cambridge History of Religious Architecture of the World (forthcoming)
  • Paul Binski, Gothic Wonder. Art, Artifice and the Decorated Style, 1290-1350 (Yale UP, 2014), 121-60.
  • Sarah M. Guérin, ‘Meaningful Spectacles: Gothic Ivories Staging the Divine’, The Art Bulletin, 95: 1, 53-77.
  • François Bucher, ‘Micro-Architecture As the ‘Idea’ of Gothic Theory and Style’, Gesta, 15: 1-2, 71-89.

British Museum Handling Session: Agnus Dei

In November 2015 Lloyd de Beer and Naomi Speakman of the British Museum treated Courtauld staff and students to another handling session, this time of a diverse range of objects with the iconography of the Agnus Dei. The session was kindly led by Irene Galandra Cooper, who is studying the Agnus Dei as part of her PhD, which forms part of the Domestic Devotions project at Cambridge: Domestic Devotions: The Place of Piety in the Italian Renaissance Home, 1400-1600.

Agnus Dei 1

Throughout the Middle Ages and Early Modern period the Agnus Dei iconography was closely associated with the wax discs made from the remains of the Paschal candles at St Peter’s, stamped with the Lamb of God, and distributed by the Papacy as gifts. This 16c print gives a sense of the near-industrial scale of this operation, while a number of Agnus Dei medallions and pendants testify to the apotropaic associations these objects soon acquired. We also looked at this niello plate medallion inscribed with the YHS, a late medieval pilgrim badge, an Agnus Dei seal impression, a reliquary case and 14c signet ring. As ever, it was the moulds that provoked particular discussion:

Agnus Dei 2

The lower of these two, apparently cast in bronze, appears to have a number of low relief moulds in which soft lead could be pressed, presumably to make brooches and badges to be pinned to clothes and hats. This record of the kinds of ephemeral objects that rarely survive raised lots of questions: who would use a mould like this, and what market does it attest to? Did these badges signal political and social affiliations, religious beliefs, or something more superficial? The wonderful fragment of a Wheel of Fortune was thought particularly intriguing.

In preparation for this session we read the following texts:

Lightbown, Chapter 22, ‘Pendants: II’, Medieval European Jewellery, Victoria & Albert Museum, 1992

Cherry, ‘Containers for Agnus Dei’, Through a Glass Brightly: Studies in Byzantine and Medieval Art and Archaeology Presented to David Buckton, ed. C. Entwistle, Oxford, 2003, 171-84

S. Bertelli, Chapter 1, The King’s body : the sacred rituals of power in medieval and early modern Europe; translated by R. Burr Litchfield, Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001.

 

British Museum Handling Session: Becket and Pilgrimage

In January 2016 Courtauld staff and students enjoyed another chance to see some of the BM’s hidden treasures thanks to the kind help of Lloyd de Beer and Naomi Speakman of the BM. This time the theme was the cult of Thomas Becket and other objects associated with pilgrimage

Becket 2 (1)

The BM has dozens of Becket pilgrims’ badges, produced in astonishing variety and throughout the Middle Ages. Most of these examples were dredged up from the river Thames:

13c badge showing Becket’s shrine

14c badge with a bell, inscribed with Thomas’ name

Best of all, the collection includes a number of moulds that are closely linked to badges, such as this one:

Late medieval badge showing Thomas on horseback

Mould for a badge

Or this one:

Becket gloves

Mould for gloves badge

Becket 2 (2)

We also looked at representations of Becket’s murder, from this early 13c Limoges reliquary chasse to this late medieval alabaster, as well as this 15c seal matrix showing Thomas in a in ship and this magnificent 13c seal from Langdon Priory. To finish off the session we also looked at a couple of late medieval prints promoting the shrine of the Beautiful Virgin at Regensburg: one showing the original church, the other the church planned (but never built) for the site.

This was partly an exploratory session for a series of workshops and conferences planned by Lloyd de Beer (UEA/British Museum), Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art) and Emily Guerry (University of Kent) in the lead up to the anniversary of Becket’s death and translation in 2020.

In preparation for the handling session we read the following texts for a reading group the night before:

Sarah Blick, ‘Votives, Images, Interaction and Pilgrimage to the Tomb and Shrine of St. Thomas Becket, Canterbury Cathedral’, In: Sarah Blick and Laura Deborah Gelfand, eds, Push me, pull you. Imaginative, emotional, physical, and spatial interaction in late medieval and Renaissance art, Leiden, 2011, 21-58
Martina Bagnoli, Holger A. Klein, C. Griffith Mann and James Robinson, eds, Treasures of heaven: saints, relics, and devotion in medieval Europe, Cleveland, Ohio, 2010, pp. 148-61 and catalogue nos 97-102
William D. Wixom, ‘In quinto scrinio de Cupro. A Copper Reliquary Chest Attributed to Canterbury: Style, Iconography, and Patronage’, In: Elizabeth C. Parker and Mary B. Shepard, eds, The Cloisters: studies in honor of the fiftieth anniversary, New York, 1992, 195-228
Jennifer Lee, ‘Searching for Signs: Pilgrims’ Identity and Experience made visible in the Miracula Sancti Thomae Cantuariensis’, In: Sarah Blick and Laura Deborah Gelfand, eds, Push me, pull you. Imaginative, emotional, physical, and spatial interaction in late medieval and Renaissance art, Leiden, 2011, 473-491.

 

The Constitutions of Clarendon blog also has a useful collection of images of Becket chasse reliquaries and manuscripts