Monthly Archives: January 2015

Call for Papers: Power of the Bishop in Western Europe 1000-1300: Episcopal Personalities

Bishop Hugh Northwold of Ely, d.1254

Bishop Hugh Northwold of Ely, d.1254

Cardiff University is pleased to announce the up-coming symposium on the episcopal office in the Middle Ages, to be held 10-12 June 2015.

There is tendency in modern historiography to approach the episcopal office, its associated duties, and episcopal power and authority abstractedly, detaching the office from the personalities which brought it to life.  The conference aims to cast light on the extent to which the personalities of the men appointed to bishoprics shaped the episcopal office as it developed in Europe between c.1000 and c.1300.  How was personality expressed through the episcopal office and its associated duties?  Bishops were not divorced from the social context and political milieu in which they lived and operated.  How did the personal relationships of an individual bishop with kings, princes, archbishops or popes, or the position of a bishop in an extended kin network, affect not only the development of the office, its functions and its societal status, but also the practice of episcopal duties?  Can a personality be reconstructed in the first place – if so, then how accurately, and where might we begin? To answer such questions, we must draw on expertise from across the disciplines, and we are confident that many more issues will be raised as the conference progresses.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

Episcopal personalities and the restoration of the secular church;

The impact of monastic personalities on the episcopal office;

Episcopal personalities and the development of monasticism or communities of secular canons;

The relationship between the topography of a city and an episcopal personality;

Ecclesiastical architecture as reflections of episcopal personalities;

Episcopal personalities and friendship networks;

The influence of episcopal personalities over secular rulers;

Episcopal personalities as causes of conflict or tools of peace-making.

Papers set in the context of the Eastern Church are particularly welcome for comparative purposes. Deadline March 8th 2015

Contact: powerofthebishop@gmail.com

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Call for Papers: Darkness and Illumination: the Pursuit of Knowledge in the Medieval and Early Modern World (Durham, 15-17 July 2015)

Folio 283 Verso of the 'Eadwine Psalter,' ca. 1160 - 1170

Folio 283 Verso of the ‘Eadwine Psalter,’ ca. 1160 – 1170

Medieval and Early Modern Student Association, Durham University

Ninth Annual Postgraduate Conference

15-17th July 2015

“Darkness and Illumination: the Pursuit of Knowledge in the Medieval and Early Modern World”

The pursuit of knowledge has had an essential and constant influence upon the shaping of society. The means of its acquisition, interpretation, and dissemination informs the way in which people interact with the world around them, forming religious and cultural identities, scientific knowledge and gender roles among other things. This was as much true in the past as it is today.

This year’s Medieval and Early Modern Student Association conference will focus upon aspects of knowledge, learning, and control over information in the medieval and early modern periods and in doing so broaden perspectives not just about how people perceived their world, but also how they interpreted the past and the idea of progress.

We welcome abstract from postgraduates and early career researchers on all aspects of this topic in medieval and early modern archaeology, history, literature, theology, art, music, and culture. Presentation topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The ‘myths’ of the Dark Ages and the Renaissance
  • The limits of archaeological, literary, and historical evidence
  • The creation of the ‘primitive’ past
  • Ideas of spiritual progression and improvement
  • The growth of networks of learning
  • Historical characterisations of race
  • Scientific knowledge and discovery
  • The expansion of the known and unknown world
  • Gendered control of knowledge
  • Urban and rural centres of learning
  • Heretics, mystics, and conflicts over belief
  • Publication, translation, and the availability of texts
  • Artistic, musical, and cultural innovation

Postgraduate and postdoctoral students are welcome to apply for presentations. In addition to the panels, the conference will offer two keynote addresses (TBA). Tours of Durham Cathedral and Castle as well as a visit to Durham Museum and Heritage Centre are scheduled for any interested delegates.

Please send abstracts of 200-300 words to memsaconference2015@gmail.com for papers no longer than 20 minutes by Friday 17th April 2015.

For more information, please visit our blog, website, or sponsor’s pages:

durhammemsa.wordpress.com * dur.ac.uk/imems/memsa * dur.ac.uk/imems

Arranged with the support of Durham University’s Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Call for Papers: Religious identities in conflict? Coexistence, Exchanges and Confrontations in the Mediterranean in the 12th-18th centuries (University of Valencia, 7-8 May 2015)

Detail from Francisco Ribalta - Saint James the Moor-Slayer in the Battle of Clavijo (1603)

Detail from Francisco Ribalta – Saint James the Moor-Slayer in the Battle of Clavijo (1603)

The question of “identity”, as well as the integration of minorities under a specific legal, political and religious framework is one of the most relevant topics in international research. This conference will focus on the multidisciplinary analysis of the evolution of this trans-cultural reality, specifically on the mechanisms for integration and exclusion existing during the 12th to the 18th centuries in the Mediterranean, due to the presence of diverse religions.

Objectives
The topics for analysis and discussion will be: 
• Analysis of the formation of religious identity in the Mediterranean.
• Spaces for living together. 
• Inquisition, violence and repression.
• The image of the “other”.
• Inter-religious solidarity networks.

Guest speakers
Dr. Luis Bernabé Pons (Universidad de Alicante-Cátedra Unesco Islam, cultura y sociedad)
Dra. Giovanna Fiume (Università degli Studi di Palermo)
Dra. Beate Fricke (University of California, Berkeley) 
Dr. Fernando Marías (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Dr. Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (Universidad Complutense de Madrid) 
Dr. Maurizio Sangalli (Univesità per Stranieri di Siena)
Dr. Amadeo Serra Desfilis (Universitat de València)
Dr. Antonio Urquízar Herrera (Universidad Nacional a Distancia).

Scientific committee 
Dr. Joan Aliaga Morell (Universitat Politécnica de València)
Dr. Luis Arciniega García (Universitat de València)
Dr. Ximo Company Climent (Universitat de Lleida)
Dr. Simon Ditchfield (University of York)
Dra. Mercedes García Arenal (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)
Dr. Vincenzo Lavenia (Università degli Studi di Macerata)
Dr. Felipe Pereda (Johns Hopkins University)
Dr. Enrique Soria Mesa (Universidad de Córdoba)
Dr. John Tolan (Universitè de Nantes)

Organizing committee
Organized by the Research Group Identidades en conflicto: la expresión artística e identitaria de las minorías religiosas en el Reino de Valencia medieval y moderno (ICEMM) GV/2014/048. – Identities in conflict. The artistic and identity expressions of the religious minorities in the Medieval and Modern Kingdom of Valencia.

Members
Dr. Borja Franco (Universitat de València)
Dr. Felipe Jerez (Universitat de València)
Dr. Manuel Lomas (Universitat de València)
D. Bruno Pomara Saverino (Universitat de València)
Dra. Nuria Ramón (Universitat Politécnica de València)
Dña. Bárbara Ruiz-Bejarano (Universidad de Alicante)
Technical secretariat
Rubén Gregori
Karen Gregorio 
Miguel Ángel Herrero

Call for communications
If you wish to present a communication, please, send an abstract of maximum 400 words, in Spanish, English, Italian or French, together with a brief academic summary, including main research milestones and publications. Deadline for abstracts is March 31st 2015. Confirmation of participation will be on April 7th 2015. Abstracts and résumés should be sent to the e-mail: identidadesenconflicto@gmail.com.

Communications will be 15-minute long. The scientific paper will be published in the Conference Book, following a double-blind peer review process.

Updates on the Conference can be followed in the FaceBook page:https://www.facebook.com/identidadesenconflicto
Registration fees

University students – attendance only: 10 € (Eur). 
Professors of professionals – attendance only: 20 € (Eur)..
In both cases, a certificate of attendance will be issued provided the person has participated in at least 75% of the sessions.
Participants with communication: 50 € (Eur). This inscription includes the Conference Book, which will be published by December 2015.

Fees must be paid by bank transfer BEFORE MAY 2ND 2015 to the following bank account (Bankia):
IBAN ES80 2038 9938 4260 0026 7500
BIC: CAHMESMMXXX

To register, send the proof of payment and your personal and contact information to: identidadesenconflicto@gmail.com

Sister Act: Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca. 1250 – 1550

sano_detail_1London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, March 13 – 14, 2015
Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

13.45 – 18.30, Friday 13 March 2015 (with registration from 13.15)
09.30 – 16.30, Saturday 14 March 2015 (with registration from 09.00)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

From important research undertaken over the last three decades, it has become evident that the institutionalisation of late Medieval and Renaissance religious women developed under very different conditions from that of their male counterparts. Furthermore, monastic foundations for women rarely adhere to a set of norms. Architecturally, female religious settlements range from large complexes erected in the most fashionable styles of their time, to basic dwellings within converted secular buildings. Diversity can also be observed in the commissioning and use of works of art, from second-hand or inherited artworks to specially-commissioned, lavish monuments and vast cycles of wall paintings. In short, artworks in the female religious context escape generalisation.

This conference will compare, contrast and juxtapose recent scholarly approaches to the art of religious women from approximately 1250 to 1550. Its primary aim is to foster exchange between scholars working on different European regions, ranging from the German-speaking areas of Europe, across the Italian peninsula to the still heavily understudied material in England, Spain, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe. The speakers will examine female monastic art and architecture in terms of devotion and ritual, patronage, space, communal identity and artistic practice. This rich programme, chronologically bridging the gap between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, seeks to initiate a broader scholarly conversation, which is long overdue.

Organised by Laura Llewellyn and Michaela Zöschg (The Courtauld Institute of Art).

Ticket/entry details: £26 (£16 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions)

BOOK ONLINE: http://ci.tesseras.com/internet/shop Or send a cheque made payable to ‘The Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, stating ‘Sister Act’. For further information, email ResearchForum@courtauld.ac.uk.

PROGRAMME

FRIDAY, 13 MARCH 2015 (DAY 1)

13.15 – 13.45
REGISTRATION

13.45 – 14.10
Introduction: Laura Llewellyn and Michaela Zöschg (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

14.10 – 15.30
SESSION I: In the Choir: Images, Prayer and Devotion (Chair TBC)

Jennifer Atwood (Museum of the Bible, Oklahoma City): ‘How Can I Find Words to Tell About the Burning Love With Which You Sought Him’: Understanding Female Devotion and Priorial Use in the Littlemore Anselm

Giuseppe Capriotti (University of Macerata): The Choir as machina memorialis. The Mystical Experience and the Artistic Patronage of Sister Battista da Varano

Daniela Rywiková (University of Ostrava): ‘Veni sponsa Christi…’. Female Monastic Spirituality and Art in Late Medieval Bohemia

Discussion

15.30 – 16.00
TEA/COFFEE BREAK (provided – Seminar room 1)

16.00 – 17.20
SESSION II: Beyond the Choir: Negotiating Gendered Space (Chair: Joanna Cannon)

Jonathan Kline (Temple University, Philadelphia): For the Clares, and for their Salvation: The Duecento Frescoes of Santa Maria inter Angelos in their Clarissan Context

Sue Sharp (Birkbeck College, University of London):The Lacock Abbey Crucifixion: Thirteenth-century Devotion and Patronage in an Augustinian Nunnery

Eva Lindquist Sandgren (Uppsala University): A Birgittine Nuns’ View. Books, Images and Space in the Monastery of Vadstena, Sweden, around 1500

Discussion

17.20 – 17.30
Break

17.30 – 18.30
KEYNOTE LECTURE

Carola Jäggi (University of Zurich): Acting as Sisters: Medieval Nunneries as Cultural Networks

18.30 – 19.30
RECEPTION

SATURDAY, 14 MARCH 2015 (DAY 2)

09.00 – 09.30
REGISTRATION

09.30 – 10.50
SESSION III: Visualising Community: Agency and Self-Representation (Chair: Susie Nash)

Christian Nikolaus Opitz (Independent Scholar): Enclosed on the Altar: Two Clarissan Altarpieces from Fifteenth-century Franconia

Angelica Federici (University of Cambridge): The Monastery of Sant’Agnese fuori le mura: Female Patronage and Political Prestige in late Medieval Rome

Alexandra Gajewski (CCHS/CSIC Madrid): Perceived Limitations, Visualized Possibilities: Activities and Agencies through Art in the Late Medieval Convent

Discussion

10.50 – 11.20
TEA/COFFEE BREAK (provided – Seminar room 1)

11.20 – 12.15
SESSION IV: Painting and Stitching: Artists in the Convent (Chair: Laura Llewellyn)

Fausta Navarro (Galleria Palatina & Museum of San Salvi, Florence): ‘Orate pro Pictora’ (Pray for the paintress). Suor Plautilla Nelli as a professional nun painter in Florence mid XVI century

Ingela Wahlberg (Uppsala University): In the Nun’s Style: A Discussion of Ornamentation and Technique in Birgittine Embroidery from Sweden and Finland in the Late Fifteenth Century.

Discussion

12.15 – 13.30
LUNCH (provided for the speakers only – Seminar room 1)

13.30 – 14.50
SESSION V: Family and Memoria: Royal and Aristocratic Patrons (Chair: Tom Nickson)

James D’Emilio (University of South Florida, Tampa): Aristocratic Women and Cistercian Nunneries in León: Family Politics and Religious Reform

Stefanie Seeberg (CCHS/CSIC, Madrid): Commemorative Function of Art in the Female Monastery of Altenberg under Gertrud of Thüringen (1227-1297)

Diana Lucía Gómez Chacón (University Complutense of Madrid): Servire a Dio è regnare. Queenship and Dominican Spirituality in Beatrice of Portugal’s Sepulchre

Discussion

14.50 – 15.20
TEA/COFFEE BREAK (provided – Seminar room 1)

15.20 – 16.15
SESSION VI: Nuns and the City: Female Monastic Communities in the Urban Fabric (Chair: Michaela Zöschg)

Veronique Bücken (Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Brussels): The Canonesses of Nivelles and the Processional Chariot of Saint Gertrude: Artistic Patronage and Propaganda

Saundra Weddle (Drury University, Springfield): Venetian Convent Architecture in Its Topographical Contexts

Discussion

16.15 – 16.30
Closing Remarks: Scott Nethersole (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Myths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Courtauld Institute, 11 March

Detail of the Portico de la Gloria, Santiago de Compostela, late twelfth century

LAST MINUTE SPACES NOW AVAILABLE!

Myths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, 2-6.30, Weds 11 March 2015.

Four papers offer new ideas on a group of well-known sculptures and manuscripts from twelfth- and thirteenth-century Spain, exploring tensions between local and international concerns.

2: Introductory remarks, Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

2.10: Rose Walker (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Beatus manuscripts during the reign of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England: a response to the fall of Jerusalem?

2.40: Rosa Rodríguez Porto (University of York)

Tvrpinus Domini gratia archiepiscopus: Notes on the Codex Calixtinus

3.10: James D’Emilio (University of South Florida)

The West Portals at Compostela and the Book of St. James: Artistic Eclecticism at a Cosmopolitan Shrine

3.40: discussion

4.15-5.15: tea

5.30-6.30:

Javier Martínez de Aguirre (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

The voices and the echoes: Saint James, Gregory the Great and Diego Gelmírez in Santiago de Compostela’s Puerta de Platerías

6.30: drinks reception

ARTES

Detail of the Portico de la Gloria, Santiago de Compostela, late twelfth centuryMyths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, 2-6.30, Weds 11 March 2015.

Attendance is free, but spaces are limited so you must register

Four papers offer new ideas on a group of well-known sculptures and manuscripts from twelfth- and thirteenth-century Spain, exploring tensions between local and international concerns.

2: Introductory remarks, Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

2.10: Rose Walker (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Beatus manuscripts during the reign of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England: a response to the fall of Jerusalem?

2.40: Rosa Rodríguez Porto (University of York)

Tvrpinus Domini gratia archiepiscopus: Notes on the Codex Calixtinus

3.10: James D’Emilio (University of South Florida)

The West Portals at Compostela and the Book of St. James: Artistic Eclecticism at a Cosmopolitan Shrine

3.40: discussion

4.15-5.15: tea

5.30-6.30:

Javier Martínez de Aguirre (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

The voices and the echoes:…

View original post 18 more words

Call for Papers: Monastic Sciences: Medicina, Mechanica, Philosophia (Leeds University, 8-9 May 2015)

Personification of Geometry teaching students (BL Burney 275 f. 293r.)

Personification of Geometry teaching students (BL Burney 275 f. 293r.)

The religious of medieval Europe were in a privileged position for studying humanity’s interaction with the natural world, whether this was considering the nature of celestial bodies and the cosmos, or deepening their pharmaceutical knowledge to aid patients in the infirmary. This conference asks what unique contributions the religious made to the applied arts and learned disciplines, how their religious vocation coloured their observations, and how this knowledge was applied to their community and wider society. We seek papers on the following areas:

The place within religious life of medicine, technology, philosophy and natural philosophy

Development of medical theory and practical care in religious communities

The definition and legitimisation of learned arts, e.g. magic and alchemy

Material culture and archaeology of artes medicinae/mechanicae within religious life

Representation of activity pertaining to natural philosophy in religious manuscripts and art

Religious conception and expression of humanity’s relationship with the non-human world

Comparison of medieval religious and secular understanding of scientia, medicina, artes mechanicae, philosophia, philosophia naturalis, physica.

Encouragement and promotion to study artes of any kind within religious communities

Reception and diffusion of ars medicina/mechanica/magica/philosopha/physica within religious communities

Historiography of medicine, “sciences” and the natural world within medieval religious life

We are also delighted to announce our keynote speakers: Prof. Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway), who will discuss religious life and medicine, and Dr Sophie Page (UCL) who will explore magic as a learned discipline within monastic life.

This event will be held over two days at the University of Leeds. We welcome contributions from postgraduates and early-career researchers of all disciplinary backgrounds. Interested parties should send a 300 word abstract for a twenty minute paper to leeds.monasticism@gmail.com.

Alternative proposals for one-hour sessions, such as joint papers or panelled debates, are most welcome. Proposals should be submitted no later than 27th February 2015. For more information please see leedsmonasticismconference.wordpress.com.

Call for papers: Graduate Student Conference on Byzantine Studies (Brookline, MA, 18 April 2015)

Panel from a Cover for an Icon of the Virgin (detail). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.644). © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Panel from a Cover for an Icon of the Virgin (detail). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.644). © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture and the Michael G. and Anastasia Cantonis Chair of Byzantine Studies at Hellenic College invite proposals for the 2015 Graduate Student Conference on Byzantine Studies, which will be held at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA on April 18, 2015. Brookline is located just outside Boston and is easily reached from any metropolitan location.

We welcome graduate student proposals for papers in all subjects, disciplines, and methodologies related to Byzantine studies broadly conceived. We invite proposals in two categories: 20-minute conference papers and dissertation reports of 5–7 pages. Conference participants will have a chance to read the reports ahead of time to encourage dialogue.

A lunchtime roundtable, Byzantium in the Public Sphere, will convene leading figures in Byzantine studies who are using traditional and digital means to build a broader audience for the field inside and outside the academy. A list of participants will be available on the conference webpage (http://maryjahariscenter.org/events/2015-graduate-student-conference-on-byzantine-studies/) in early February.

This year’s conference immediately follows Trading Places: Cultural Crossings in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, Byzantium, Islam, and the West, a symposium organized by the Mary Jaharis Center and the Harvard University Committee on Medieval Studies. The symposium will take place on April 16 and 17 at Harvard University. Please check the Mary Jaharis Center website (http://maryjahariscenter.org) in early February for details.

To submit a proposal for either type of paper, complete the short online form and upload a 500-word abstract on the Mary Jaharis Center website (http://maryjahariscenter.org/events/2015-graduate-student-conference-on-byzantine-studies/). The deadline for submissions is February 10, 2015. Notifications will be made by the end of February.

An accepted paper represents a commitment from the contributor to present his or her paper in person at the conference. Given the brevity of the conference, please do not submit a proposal if you cannot attend all conference sessions.

The registration fee for the conference is $25. Shared accommodation at the Courtyard Boston Brookline will be provided the nights of April 17 and 18. Breakfast and lunch will be provided on the day of the conference. Participants are responsible for travel expenses; however, partial financial aid for students outside the Boston area who could not otherwise attend is available.

Contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture (mjcbac@hchc.edu) with any questions about the conference.

Organizing Committee: Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture, Hellenic College Holy Cross, Dr. James C. Skedros, Dean of the Holy Cross Graduate School of Greek Orthodox Theology and Michael G. and Anastasia Cantonis Professor of Byzantine Studies and Professor of Early Christianity, Hellenic College Holy Cross, and the Very Reverend Dr. Joachim Cotsonis, Director, Archbishop Iakovos Library and Learning Resource Center, Hellenic College Holy Cross

Support comes from The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture and the Michael G. and Anastasia Cantonis Chair of Byzantine Studies